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Messages - a10t2

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2401
The Pub / Re: Having fun with sanitation
« on: January 26, 2012, 12:39:42 AM »
That competition is still held at Purdue every year. I went to a couple. Trust me, the Youtube videos don't do them justice.

2402
The Pub / Re: So you are out in the woods and spot this...
« on: January 25, 2012, 06:08:54 PM »
THEN I would properly dispose of the shot up can....

If you can find the can, you haven't shot it enough.

2403
The Pub / Re: So you are out in the woods and spot this...
« on: January 25, 2012, 03:05:44 PM »
Keystone Light: Not Even Once.

2404
All Grain Brewing / Re: Efficiency: How Good is Too Good
« on: January 25, 2012, 01:22:04 PM »
Oxidation yes, but I've found hot-side aeration to be a non-issue on my system with my normal practices.  I don't go out of my way to avoid it, there are just few opportunities for it to happen.  Maybe that's what you mean by impractical?

From a process standpoint, I don't consider cold-side and hot-side oxidation to be all that different. Or at least, the fix is the same - avoid contact with the air. You're absolutely right that with decent equipment HSA can be avoided almost entirely. OTOH, there are definitely home brewers who do things like let the wort drop several feet from the lauter tun into the kettle.

Shelf life and storage conditions are big concerns for pro brewers, whereas home brewers have more control. Store the beer warm for a couple months and it makes sense to pay just as much attention to HSA as to CSA, IMHO.

2405
All Grain Brewing / Re: Humdinger Attenuation Issue
« on: January 25, 2012, 01:15:57 PM »
Based on the mash profile, that's actually a little higher than I'd expect the beer to finish. You're essentially mashing for maximum fermentability and then hoping for moderate attenuation.

If you want to keep the decoction but reduce fermentability, you could always skip the beta rest. Mash in at ~152°F and decoct to 158°F. That should still give you 75-80% ADF if my experiences with 206 are any indication.

2406
All Grain Brewing / Re: Efficiency: How Good is Too Good
« on: January 25, 2012, 01:08:50 PM »
1. Unnecessary for homebrewers, necessary (or a good idea, depending on what you're doing) for pros.

I wouldn't even go that far. I'd say everyone should avoid oxidation throughout the process. Home brewers are just more likely to have equipment limitations that make that impractical.

2407
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP007 vs WLP002
« on: January 25, 2012, 12:54:59 PM »
This cropped up (pardon the pun) recently with a less specific title: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=10402.0

2408
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st Kit, fermenting kind of cold
« on: January 25, 2012, 08:13:27 AM »
you have doubled your carbonation level from a sane and safe 2.4ish volumes to a worrisome 4.8ish.

3.8ish - there's about 1.0 vol already in the beer based on his temperatures. Not that that makes a huge difference.

2409
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st Kit, fermenting kind of cold
« on: January 24, 2012, 09:01:21 PM »
Take another reading in a few days and if it's still at 1.016 you can go ahead and bottle. That's a totally reasonable FG, especially if this is an extract beer.

2410
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Efficiency and adjuncts
« on: January 24, 2012, 08:46:56 PM »
Can you share data?

Sorry, no. I don't have a lot analysis around and we switched almost a year back. It could just be that my memory's faulty. OTOH, that page also has it at 6 SRM, and I know for sure that what we got was 7-8 SRM. So maybe Midwest is worked from an old analysis too.

2411
The Pub / Re: Having fun with sanitation
« on: January 24, 2012, 08:41:48 PM »
Well, if you aren't crazy yet, a few semesters at Purdue will do it.

I had Dr. Lewis for micro, but come to think of it that was over a decade ago.

2412
Equipment and Software / Re: Cheapest/best wort chilling device.
« on: January 24, 2012, 06:31:54 PM »
Ice is both the most efficient and the cheapest. If you chill to ~110°F and then add a gallon of ice (sanitary frozen water bottles or whatever, it will drop into the mid-60s.

BTW, here's the search link: http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?action=search
It's the third from the left in the top navigation. Google is even better: http://www.google.com/search?q=efficient+chiller+site:homebrewersassociation.org

2413
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 1st Kit, fermenting kind of cold
« on: January 24, 2012, 06:23:44 PM »
I'm assuming this is an extract kit, in which case the maltster would have precipitated the hot break during the boil and you shouldn't expect to see much, if any.

Nottingham does pretty well with cool temperatures, but I'd get it up into the 65-70°F range ASAP to make sure it finishes out. Realistically, though, the beer has probably already been at FG for a few days. Temperature control is really only critical for the first day or two, and it's common to warm the fermenter up after that to get the beer finished faster.

When I'm doing a concentrated boil, I like to boil and freeze the top-off water ahead of time. That way you can chill the wort at the same time and kill two birds with one stone.

2414
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Efficiency and adjuncts
« on: January 24, 2012, 06:15:49 PM »
From which malster?

Weyermann (~80) and Cargill (~120). I *think* I may have had one lot from Weyermann that was around 60-70, but I'm not sure.

2415
The Pub / Re: Having fun with sanitation
« on: January 24, 2012, 06:10:45 PM »
My boss has seen that gif.  I'm giving it about a week til he tries it in the lab.  (Mind you, those will probably be Kimax carboys, but still...)   ;D

If it's who I think it is he'll probably try it alone the first time and only tell you if it works... ;)

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