Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - a10t2

Pages: 1 ... 183 184 [185] 186 187 ... 256
2761
Kegging and Bottling / Re: How Much CO2 Does it Take?
« on: February 08, 2011, 09:36:27 PM »
Depending on temperature and carb levels, to carb and serve a 5 gal keg should each take about 60-80 g of CO2. So with no losses, a 10 lb tank should carb and serve at least 28 kegs. If you aren't getting 15 out of it, you definitely have a leak.

2762
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Cold conditioning vs priming sugar calculations
« on: February 08, 2011, 04:28:08 PM »
You want to use the warmest temperature the beer reached post-fermentation. In this case, that would be 68°F.

When cooling, some CO2 will return to the beer, but unless the headspace is equal to the liquid volume the effect will be less than 0.1 vol.

2763
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Frigid Weather Brewing
« on: February 08, 2011, 03:39:52 PM »
BTW, I've been drinking your THA clone recently. Very tasty!

Sweet! Would you call it cloned? I can't get THA any more, so you'd better believe I'll have that recipe on tap all summer and fall...

2764
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: White House Homebrew
« on: February 07, 2011, 08:37:21 PM »
Jefferson was not only a brewer but apparently had more than a passing interest in brewing science: http://www.monticello.org/site/research-and-collections/beer

On the other hand...
Quote
"I have no reciept [sic] for brewing," Jefferson replied, "and I much doubt the operations of malting and brewing could be successfully performed from a reciept."

2765
All Grain Brewing / Re: Water profile for pale ales
« on: February 07, 2011, 03:52:22 PM »
Here's my process: http://seanterrill.com/2009/08/08/water-water-everywhere/

For your water, I would start by cutting it 50/50 with distilled or RO water, then add 0.25 g/gal CaCl2. That gives you:

Ca 49 ppm, Mg 13 ppm, Na 46 ppm, SO4 110 ppm, Cl 34 ppm, HCO3 68 ppm, and an RA of ~10 ppm CaCO3. That should be fine up to maybe 10 SRM; if you're going much darker than that add a little chalk. 0.5 g/gal CaCO3 would bring your RA to ~40.

2766
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: White House Homebrew
« on: February 07, 2011, 02:17:56 PM »
The WH kitchen staff are all active military--Navy, I think.

That's the stewards, not the kitchen staff.

2767
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: White House Homebrew
« on: February 07, 2011, 08:17:53 AM »
There was homebrew served at the White House during the Super Bowl! When's the last time that happened? Jefferson? JQA? Jackson?

I don't think those guys were big football fans.

2768
All Grain Brewing / Re: Killing enzymes?
« on: February 07, 2011, 08:14:38 AM »
That's a pretty generous ratio, Drew. ;)

2769
All Grain Brewing / Re: Killing enzymes?
« on: February 06, 2011, 03:15:05 PM »
Ah, good point. For some reason I was thinking the gelatinization temperature was lower.

2770
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Frigid Weather Brewing
« on: February 06, 2011, 10:38:24 AM »
9* in your kitchen?  ???

Three exterior walls, lots of windows/doors, and the stove is in the living room. :-\

2771
All Grain Brewing / Re: Killing enzymes?
« on: February 06, 2011, 10:34:29 AM »
Sean, nice experiment. You should put that on your blog, then I can point brewers to it when the discussion comes up.

Thanks Kai. I thought I had written it up, but apparently not. And now I can't find my notes. :-\

For your experiment, how long was the 144F rest, and how long was the 158F rest, and how long was the mash overall?  And for the reverse, how long was it at 144F?

They were both 90 minute mashes. The traditional schedule would have been roughly 40 min at each temperature. The test mash dropped continuously over that time. I don't think I even tracked temperature vs. time, though. Assuming it was roughly linear, it would have spent about 30 min below 149°F.

Clearly I'll have to re-do this experiment. That could be a good project to keep me occupied between commercials tonight. ;)

What temperatures would be best? Last time I chose 62/70°C for no particular reason. Would going to 60/70°C be expected to yield a more fermentable wort? Or even higher for the alpha rest?

2772
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Frigid Weather Brewing
« on: February 06, 2011, 10:08:08 AM »
Well, I thought I was safe moving my brewing into the kitchen, but the last few nights I've had a few beers in the kitchen freeze and burst. The "hold" function on the thermometers says it got to 9°F inside, -26°F outside. :o

2773
Where is the beer in the process now?

Edit: Looking at the recipe, that's a 1.036 beer with >25% of the fermentables coming from sugar. I'd be shocked if it only got to 3.0% ABV. How are you estimating the alcohol content?

2774
All Things Food / Re: Pot Smokin
« on: February 05, 2011, 12:03:28 PM »
Is that just finely shredded wood you're using for the smoke?

2775
All Grain Brewing / Re: Killing enzymes?
« on: February 05, 2011, 12:00:30 PM »
So, according to tschmidlin, and I have no reason to not believe what he says - I respect his knowledge, if some of these enzymes re-nature what would be the effect of starting hot, say 170f, and letting the mash cool down to 150?

I tried that once and it made a much less fermentable wort. One mash had rests at 144°F and 158°F, and the other started at 158°F and dropped to 144°F over the course of about an hour and a half. The control wort had about 65% RDF, and the other was about 45%. I don't have the notes with me.

Alpha amylase requires the beta amylase products to produce a reasonably fermentable wort. Doing it in reverse would be easier, but isn't really possible.

Pages: 1 ... 183 184 [185] 186 187 ... 256