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Messages - tschmidlin

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7621
Other Fermentables / Re: Cider from store bought juice
« on: September 13, 2010, 08:05:41 PM »
I've had cider made from store bought juice that was delicious when it was very young.

7622
All Grain Brewing / Re: A little help with my Water Report
« on: September 13, 2010, 07:44:31 PM »
If Ward Labs reported your sulfate the way they did mine, it is:
Sulfate, SO4-S

You need to multiply that by 3 to get the ppm value.  There was some discussion of this in the post you water report thread.

There aren't really any standard corrections for any brewing water, it all depends on the beer you're trying to make.  Cutting it with RO or distilled water is your only choice if you want to use soft water, and yes, it will cut all of the ions.  You'll just have to build it back up to whatever levels you want using a variety of salts.

7623
Kegging and Bottling / Re: New keg system
« on: September 13, 2010, 07:36:24 PM »
I'll run  4.5 feet of beer line from the faucets to the kegs.
This might not be long enough.  You have to balance your system, and in my experience the stated psi/foot is often too low.  So don't go cutting anything just yet.

QUESTION - does the gas line lenght matter like the beer hose lenght? Can I run a 2 foot gas line from the CO2 tank to the manifold?
No.  Yes.
As in no, gas line length doesn't matter, and yes, you can run a 2 foot length from the tank to manifold, and from the manifold to the kegs.  Use however much you need to make it easy to connect/disconnect kegs.

Real world QUESTIONS - Once I put beer in a keg, what do I do? Seal the top, then what? Should I just attach the gas line and leave the gas at at 10 pounds until in comes out?
Seal it and put pressure on it.  Minimum of 5 psi to seal the keg.  How high you go depends on the carbonation level you want in your beer and the temperature of the beer.  The volumes of CO2 desired in a beer is typically determined by the style.  You can find some values here or several other places, that's just the first one I googled.  When you know your temperature and desired volumes of CO2 you can look it up in a carbonation chart like this one, again the first one I googled.  I highly recommend carbonating at serving pressure, it takes a little longer but is really easy with no danger of overshooting on the carb.

Do I dial down the pressure after the beer is carbonated in a few days?
I wouldn't, just leave it at serving temperature/pressure and it will equilibrate to the right level of carbonation.  Then cut your serving hoses to the proper length for the psi you are serving your beer with.

The other option of course, is to carbonate it to the proper level, then adjust the gas while you're pouring to get a nice pour.  Since you're using a manifold instead of a bank of secondary regulators, this is the most realistic option if you're trying to serve beers with different CO2 levels.  Just remember to turn the gas in each keg back up to the carbonation pressure when you're done pouring at your serving pressure.

7624
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: did i kill my yeast/
« on: September 13, 2010, 07:18:09 PM »
24 hours isn't that long to wait based on what you've told us of your procedure.  I agree, if you have more yeast or can get one go ahead and add it.  If not, just give it another day and you should see some activity.

7625
The Pub / Re: Name That Tune!
« on: September 13, 2010, 07:13:36 PM »
Albinism and classic monster movies a good hint? 
No :)

Doesnt anybody have any good ones?  I am thinking of a bunch.
I posted a beer one a while back that got no responses, but it's an obscure song by a pretty obscure group.

7626
The Pub / Re: Name That Tune!
« on: September 13, 2010, 04:17:36 PM »
I think Denny's got the best answer, no matter what you had in mind, cap :)

7627
The Pub / Re: Name That Tune!
« on: September 13, 2010, 02:54:53 PM »
That was awesome Jeff!

Come on Denny, you can do it!  Or just look on the album and see if it's there :)

I will be amazed if anyone gets this one.

"                                                                     "
Jimi Hendrix - Star Spangled Banner

7628
The Pub / Re: Name That Tune!
« on: September 13, 2010, 02:01:20 PM »
Helpless people on subway trains scream bug eyed as he looks in on them.
Godzilla - Blue Öyster Cult

Now if I can figure out how to put in an umlaut . . . did it work?  Sweet :)

<edit>Oh, and I always thought they screamed "My God!". :)  Maybe Denny knows the truth.

7629
Ingredients / Re: Potential Gravity for Orange Juice?
« on: September 13, 2010, 01:55:06 PM »
According to this article:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2621.1992.tb05499.x/abstract

"whereas the reduced acidity Sour orange juice  was 7.4 “Brix", that's about 1.030

But that's all google will show me.  I don't have access to the full article though, maybe someone else does.

I found another article that had an average over 10 years of 10.4 brix, so about 1.041 SG.
From "Evaluation of rootstocks for the Cyprus local lemon variety ‘Lapithkiotiki’ "

I think your best bet is to just measure it with a refractometer or hydrometer.  I'd be more worried about the bitterness than the sugar though, they are called bitter oranges too and I don't know how that will carry over into the finished beer :)  The bitterness might come from just the peel and the walls so maybe it won't be an issue depending on how you plan to juice them. 

7630
All Grain Brewing / Re: umami water treatment
« on: September 13, 2010, 01:36:45 PM »
All I'm trying to say is that while glutamate may be a component of off flavors caused by autolysis, it's probably not the entirety of it.  The BJCP study guide lists autolysis as a possible cause for sulfury/yeasty flavors, which I don't think would increase if you added straight MSG.  I could be wrong though.

If MSG is a good additive for doctoring beers to mimic autolysis though, maybe we should add it to the BJCP Study Guide.  I don't have that kind of power though . . .  :)

7631
All Grain Brewing / Re: umami water treatment
« on: September 13, 2010, 12:16:43 PM »
Yeah, but those two are on the list for doctoring beers to mimic flaws.  Autolysis will release some glutamate, but it's not clear to me that glutamate is the main cause of autolysis off-flavors.  Do you have a reference I can read through?

7632
Zymurgy / Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
« on: September 13, 2010, 11:43:58 AM »
I've got a long list :)

7633
All Grain Brewing / Re: umami water treatment
« on: September 13, 2010, 11:41:25 AM »
If you want your beer to taste like glutamate, just leave it on the yeast in a warm place for an extended time.

We like to call it 'autolysis'.
Have you added MSG to beer?  I could see similarities from the flavor descriptions.  Maybe try it in the glass before you do it in 5 gallons.

7634
Zymurgy / Re: 2011 Zymurgy topics
« on: September 13, 2010, 10:45:45 AM »
How about taking a piece of geeky brewing research and dumb it down to a Joe 6 pack level?  I want to know what people are experimenting with and what the results are but I can get through these technical research papers.

That's a great idea.  Take a very technical topic and put it in average homebrewer terms and explain how it relates to what we do.
I like the idea too, and I'd love to write some of the yeast ones! :)

7635
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: sugar added to secondary
« on: September 13, 2010, 10:36:52 AM »
I don't know if leaving it in primary will help the gravity drop, that depends on if there are still fermentable sugars available.  But moving it to secondary will definitely not help it drop.  You can try warming it and rousing the yeast in primary and see if you get any movement on the SG.

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