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Messages - theoman

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1
I stopped taking gravity readings mid 2016 cause I realized I don't care.

I order only milled grain and it sits for many months before use.

I never make starters.

I ferment at whatever temp my basement is.

This is excellent. Do what you enjoy or you won't do it at all.

"I ferment at whatever temp my basement is" is something I've done for years, but I would design my beers (and still do) with that temp in mind.

2
Beer Travel / Re: Paris 2017
« on: January 06, 2017, 03:52:00 AM »
La Fine Mousse is a must. It's near Pere-Lachaise cemetery, so combining the two might be good.
http://www.lafinemousse.fr/

The Frog pubs have come a long way in recent years. Check out the Frog & Rosbif: http://www.frogpubs.com/pub-the-frog-rosbif-paris-1.php

Now that I typed all this, I found this:
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=25820.msg332835#msg332835

3
Simcoe hops are delicious and in no way taste or smell remotely like cat pee!

I agree that they're delicious, especially when used together with other hops like Amarillo. BUT, I used to agree with you, thinking that people were crazy to equate the aroma with cat pee. Then I went to a cat shelter and visited their enclosed outdoor area. Totally smelled like Simcoe.

4
You can make excellent beer without stressing about your water profile, HSA, etc... Quit making things so complicated (unless that's what you're into).

I live in Belgium and very rarely drink commercial Belgian beer (I mostly drink my own beer, which is technically always Belgian, but rarely "Belgian style").

Dry yeast is awesome. 


5
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: This is Belgium
« on: January 02, 2017, 05:18:45 AM »
What is the traditional beer to pair with each of the following?



I'd say:


6
The Pub / Re: ever changing palate
« on: December 19, 2016, 03:55:16 AM »
This is one big reason why I don't enter competitions (except that one time when I was tricked into it and, um, took first place). I have a small crew of trusted tasters and if they say it's good and I say it's good, then it's good.

7
All Grain Brewing / Re: steel cut oats in oatmeal stout
« on: December 19, 2016, 03:48:59 AM »
so has anyone tried cooking up the oats into a well cooked goo before adding it to the mash (cereal mash like)?  If you do that, does the efficiency of that portion of the grist bill improve?

I use flaked oats and barley all the time and usually they just kind of disappear in the mash.  When I'm doing the grainout after a brew day, I don't see the flaked stuff sitting in the grain, it looks like it has just dissolved away for the most part.

Most of my brews include oats and most of the time I pre-cook, unless I'm using instant or quick oats. Even then, I sometimes I goo it up just to satisfy the OCD in me.

8
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« on: November 25, 2016, 01:06:09 AM »
I'm a big fan of 37/70, but I used s-189 for my last lager and I will definitely use it again. It might even become my go-to yeast for lagers. I pitched at around 9C and ramped up over 5 or 6 days to 18 (the temp in my cellar), went on vacation, kegged it when I got back and put it in the fridge for about 3 weeks at 6-ish, then tapped. It's possibly the best lager I've brewed and definitely had the most authentic Germanic lageriness of the lagers I've brewed.

What did you brew with the 189?

Pretty basic, hop-forward German-ish lager. Pils, Vienna, some flaked barley and a bit of carapils. Lots of hops, mostly Saaz. If you want more specifics, I can dig up the recipe.

9
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: W34/70 vs S-189
« on: November 24, 2016, 05:18:55 AM »
I'm a big fan of 37/70, but I used s-189 for my last lager and I will definitely use it again. It might even become my go-to yeast for lagers. I pitched at around 9C and ramped up over 5 or 6 days to 18 (the temp in my cellar), went on vacation, kegged it when I got back and put it in the fridge for about 3 weeks at 6-ish, then tapped. It's possibly the best lager I've brewed and definitely had the most authentic Germanic lageriness of the lagers I've brewed.

10
All Grain Brewing / Re: First all-grain, water concern
« on: September 08, 2016, 04:51:52 AM »
You softener should have a bypass setting (knob, lever or something). Try to bypass it and taste the water. If it tastes ok, try brewing with the unsoftened water or even try half-and-half (which I've done often). I've also done brews with 100% softened water and they turned out fantastic. Granted, the softening settings on my softener are set pretty low.   

11
... Suspicious first post.

Indeed. First and, so far, only post.

When craft breweries sell out, it allows ME to remain steadfast in the brewing of my own. I'll start worrying when the various maltings, hops growers, etc monopolize.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why no home brew TV shows?
« on: August 26, 2016, 12:58:43 AM »
Over here in the UK, we have some show about wine.  I reckon a similar format for beer with a slot about homebrewing could work.

Yeah, that was my point. One can brew a lot of batches in the amount of time it takes to grow an eggplant (aubergine). If anybody can pull it off, the BBC can. Actually, maybe I should say, If anybody would be willing to take a subject that would normally result in incredibly boring television and make a program anyway, the BBC would.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why no home brew TV shows?
« on: August 25, 2016, 04:01:54 AM »
The BBC should be able to pull it off. They manage to have shows about lambing and a competition program about gardening.

14
The Pub / Re: Espresso machines
« on: August 04, 2016, 11:59:05 PM »
Just get the freshest and best coffee beans on the planet, and a very good grinder. Then you can make fabulous coffee with your grandmother's stockings.

I agree the coffee makes all the difference. However the preparation is also important. I like espresso but it hasn't replaced my simple single cup hand pour. That makes the best coffee for my tastes. I like the Aeropress but think the hand pour is still better. I'm not a big fan of the flavor of press pot coffee but will drink it that way from to time (used to be my go to preference.)

Anything is better than preground nasty hotel coffee.

I might have more in common with homoeccentricus than I care to admit.

I agree that process is also important. Since my espresso machine died (Gaggia Baby Class), I've been using an Aeropress. I think I've found a good balance between simplicity and flavor, the key being temperature. I think the same goes with press pot coffee. As homebrewers, we have cool tools on hand like a Thermapen. My Thermapen gets more use with coffee than beer these days. 

Oh, and on roasters... I've been doing the hot air popcorn popper method for years. The volume is too low for hardcore drinkers, but it works.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Why Do You Homebrew?
« on: July 27, 2016, 02:27:53 AM »
The fact that it's a hobby helps to offset the costs of equipment while the reward of the hobby is high quality beer for less.

^^Well, said, this. And the instances of paying too much money for mediocre beer are becoming too frequent. I brew what I like and I like what I brew.

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