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Messages - ipaguy

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16
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Partial mash question
« on: January 16, 2011, 02:41:19 PM »
It seems that a lot of folks are hesitant to make starters when first getting started, but they really shouldn't be.  You can put together a top-of-the-line setup for 2 liter starters for under $20.  That pays for itself pretty quickly vs. $5 - $6 each for extra smack packs or vials.  If you're not using the Mr. Malty calculator, a general rule of thumb is that you should be using 2 smack-packs or vials for ales with OGs over 1.060, and double everything for lagers.
What goes into your top of the line setup for starters for under $20?  I don't see how you get there for that little. 
Granted you don't need to spend $100, but $20 seems low.
Maybe 'top-of-the-line' was a little too strong a phrase.  I certainly didn't include a stir plate!  However, you can get a good new 2 liter Erlenmeyer flask for $18.  Aluminum foil works, but I use the foam plugs (around $1 -$2).  I didn't include cost of DME or yeast nutrient as 'equipment', as I consider them as supplies.  Main point is that making starters is neither difficult nor expensive.

17
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Partial mash question
« on: January 15, 2011, 05:27:48 PM »
It seems that a lot of folks are hesitant to make starters when first getting started, but they really shouldn't be.  You can put together a top-of-the-line setup for 2 liter starters for under $20.  That pays for itself pretty quickly vs. $5 - $6 each for extra smack packs or vials.  If you're not using the Mr. Malty calculator, a general rule of thumb is that you should be using 2 smack-packs or vials for ales with OGs over 1.060, and double everything for lagers.

18
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Warrior and Amarillo in an IPA?
« on: January 15, 2011, 04:51:05 PM »
I've used Amarillo with Nugget with great results.  I would guess that the combination with Warrior would be similar.

19
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast Headwaters Ale
« on: January 15, 2011, 04:43:23 PM »
Try emailing Wyeast for info.  They're generally very responsive.
Done.  Will pass along what I find out.
Edit:  Here's the info I got back from WYeast:

Attenuation: 73-77%
Flocculation: Medium
Optimum Fermentation Temperature: 60-75°F
Alcohol Tolerance: 10%


20
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Wyeast 1007 for IPA's???
« on: January 15, 2011, 04:30:54 PM »
Just wondering if the slow flocculation of the 1007 is part of the reason that it does a good job of cleaning up after itself when used in the traditional altbier lagering method.  tanstaafl.

21
Yeast and Fermentation / Wyeast Headwaters Ale
« on: January 15, 2011, 03:12:21 PM »
I just saw a Midwest tweet about a new, proprietary Wyeast strain: http://www.midwestsupplies.com/catalog/product/view/id/6139/.  Just a general description so far.  I'd like more information re. recommend temps, EtOH tolerance, and attenuation range on this one.  Anyone have any more info?

22
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Can I brew Ales at ambient temps in 50's
« on: January 02, 2011, 08:13:35 PM »
There's no problem fermenting ales in the 50s...I routinely ferment my alt at 52F (or even a bit less) with WY1007.  That same yeast would make a great APA or AIPA.  But when you say "Belgian tripel ingredients", to me that includes the yeast, since that is just about the key ingredient in a tripel.
Even if you could get something like WY3522 or 3787 to ferment at those temperatures, I doubt if they would give you the esters & phenolics you want.  Best bet would be increase fermentation temperature or choose a different style.  Nothing wrong with choosing the style you brew based on ambient conditions.  People have been doing that for years.

23
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Can I brew Ales at ambient temps in 50's
« on: January 02, 2011, 06:41:53 PM »
It would have virtually none of the esters or phenolics that identify  beer as Belgian.  It isn't so much about hitting a style as brewing what you intended to brew.
+1.  & those characteristics are quite temperature dependent.  However, the OP asked if he could "brew ales at ambient temps in the '50s".  I would have to say 'Yes, absolutely!'  If he had asked if he could brew Belgian style ales at those temps, I'd say 'No way!'

24
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Can I brew Ales at ambient temps in 50's
« on: January 02, 2011, 05:35:28 PM »
OP, are you dead-set on brewing a Belgian style?  If so, you are probably going to need to do something to increase your fermentation temperature.  There are several styles that might work perfectly in your environment without additional equipment: An altbier, or a kolsch, or maybe a Scotch Ale.  Among the WYeast strains you might consider 1007 German Ale, 1728 Scotch Ale, or 2565 Kolsch.  It might be an interesting experiment to try Belgian Triple ingredients with the 1728, which is very alcohol tolerant.  I have no idea how it would turn out; might be great or might suck big time.  I would only do that if (like me) you take a very casual attitude about brewing to style.

25
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Looking for some Temp tips
« on: January 02, 2011, 05:13:20 PM »
And you can use your Johnson to control it. ...
:o

26
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Substituting ale yeast for lager yeast
« on: December 31, 2010, 02:47:25 PM »
I boil for 90 min anytime I use pilsner malt just to be safe.

If I move the fermenter upstairs wouldn't the temperature rise be too fast? It would go from 50 to 65 in a few hours.

You can wrap a couple blankets around it to slow the temperature rise.

27
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Not quite off topic...
« on: December 31, 2010, 02:17:58 PM »
Reminds me of the time I tried to dry home-grown hot peppers in a food dehydrator.  Ever seen how they do gas mask training of soldiers by filling a room with tear gas?

28
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Short's Autumn Ale
« on: December 30, 2010, 02:35:44 AM »
That's interesting that you refer to it as an ESB. Most bars around here (West Michigan) were classifying it as Short's version of a Marzen/Oktoberfest! I guess I can taste a bit of both, although technically it IS an ale. Not sure why your six was sour, I've had a few of the Autumn and they've been quite consistant. The Huma on the other hand has been great in a bottle, but tastes like soap whenever I get it on tap!

It's not me calling it an ESB.  That's what they put on the label.

Shows you how much bars pay attention!!! They probably figured since it was a 'fall' beer, well then it must be an Oktoberfest!

Here's the proof (re. ESB)!  http://www.shortsbrewing.com/beer/our-portfolio/annual-beers/autumn-ale/
The 6-pack that was sour was sitting on a grocery store shelf at room temp for God-knows how long, but still....  Picked up a couple more seasonals @ the pub and they're quite good.  Reviews to follow.

29
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Swedes, help me out here, please.
« on: December 29, 2010, 11:08:51 PM »
AKA...
Gotlandsdricku

Probably just depends on where you were raised & how your family spelled/said it.
I think Finns & Norwegians call it sahti.


Your safest spelling is probably "Gotlandsdricke".

Oh no!  Now I've got four ways to spell it?  Must have a homebrew to chill out.  I've actually been using the 'safest' one.

30
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brewers Clarex and Gluten
« on: December 29, 2010, 07:13:47 PM »
This looks pretty good.  I put a lot of stock on whatever White Labs says.  When it comes to enzymes, the two questions that come to mind are 'what are optimum temperature and pH?'  I didn't see any info on this on the links.  I also wonder if it work best in the fermenter, or in the mash during protein rest.

Some of their other enzymes interest me as well.  I like the taste of rye and wheat, but I also like a crystal-clear beer.

Edit: btw, one of the White brothers (the other one, I think) talks about this in a 7/24/2010 episode of the Sunday Session on the BN.

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