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Messages - skyler

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1
An efficiency jump and the world's worst stuck sparge made me rethink my brewing plan and I ended up with 6 gallons of 1.12 wort. It's zero-adjunct, and was mashed for dryness (45 mins at 142F - 30 mins at 160F). The resting temperatures and super high gravity are both due to this being my first attempt at decocting. The yeast strain I am using is Imperial Gnome (similar to Wyeast 3522 Belgian Ardennes). The wort was mostly Best Pils with some Best Dark Munich and a pinch of CaraRed.

I added pure O2 before pitching an appropriate amount of dense slurry, but I want to know when and if I should re-oxygenate the actively fermenting beer. Activity was visible about 6 hours after pitching, and it's pumping along steadily now at 66F (30 hours after pitching). So when do you add extra O2 to your beer?

2
A few things from my experience:

- extract beers come out maltier
- a smack pack of a certain yeast strains will produce maltier beer
- a really hoppy beer would have 3-4 oz of hops at the end of the boil and another 3-4 oz dry
- post-fermentation oxidation can make beer less hoppy

My recommendations:

- use more hops at flameout and dry
- use US-05 dry yeast for most American-style ales until you're ready to build yeast starters
- switch to all-grain as soon as you feel comfortable
- brewing maltier beers like brown ales and blond ales first can help you get used to the process without spending a ton of money on hops

3
If yeast starters are too advanced or scary, just use US-56 (what 05 was called st the time) and call it a day.

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4
Beer Recipes / Re: First Black IPA recipe; critique please
« on: April 21, 2018, 02:11:38 AM »
My experience has been that 1.25-1.5 lbs of carafa 3 or midnight wheat added at lauter has been the perfect amount for pitch black. I now usually go with (per 6 gallons wort since I lose a lot to dry hops), .5 lbs crystal 40-60L and 1-1.5 lbs Munich have been my sweet spot.

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5
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Best Dry Yeast for a Märzen
« on: April 01, 2018, 05:37:39 PM »
Ok, I'll try this. I assume 1-1.5L will work for 5.5 gallons? That would fit in a half gallon mason jar, which is convenient.

What strain should I use, then? I was leaning toward Imperial Harvest, but Wyeast is a little cheaper if I don't need the extra cells.

6
All Grain Brewing / Re: ESB recipe
« on: April 01, 2018, 06:15:59 AM »
90-100% British-type pale malt
0-10% Crystal malt
0-5% sugar
0-10% wheat (flaked, torrified, or malted)

bitter with whatever to 30-40 IBUs
.5-1 oz British or noble-tyoe hops per 5 gal at 30-10 mins
0-1 oz British or noble-tyoe hops per 5 gal at flameout/whirlpool
0-2 oz British or noble-tyoe hops per 5 gal dry

10 lbs Golden Promise
12 oz Crystal 60L
.5 lbs torrified wheat

1 oz Bravo 60 mins for ~30 ibus
.5 oz Goldings at 10 mins
.5 oz Crystal whirlpool
.5 oz crystal dry

WLP002 or S-04 (fermented COLD)

7
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Best Dry Yeast for a Märzen
« on: March 30, 2018, 05:54:46 PM »
Make a shaken starter off of preboil wort and pitch a bit later in the day.
Pull off into small pot, boil, chill, make starter. It does need to be boiled, no?
Will be lots of lactobacilli from the grain husks, better boil.  Unless you can ensure that mash off time + temp = sufficient Pasteurization units, and do you feel lucky?  I would just simplify things and use chilled post boil wort.
Yes, boil the starter.
So you boil 2L of wort for 10 mins, then put it in the fridge for a few hours, oxygenate, pitch a pack of liquid yeast at ~75°, then wait a few more hours and pitch the starter into the wort? I suppose that's worth a try. Presumably, I can use second runnings for this, too.

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8
This will be my first HBC! I live about a mile and a half north of the convention center, so it's easy.

I recommend anyone looking for accommodations try out the "name your price" bit with priceline - using the "Convention Center/Lloyd Center" neighborhood and 3 stars. Chances are you will get a decent deal at the Marriott Courtyard down the street from the convention center.


9
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Best Dry Yeast for a Märzen
« on: March 25, 2018, 10:48:39 PM »
I'm brewing up a Märzen and hate the giant starters needed for lagers, so I'm going to rehydrate two packs of dry yeast. My M84 experience has been great, but I'm open to suggestions.

Edit: Since I noticed the poll doesn't show up consistently on mobile, the choices are between:

S-189 Swiss Lager
M76 Bavarian Lager
M84 Bohemian Lager
W-34/70 Weihenstephan Lager
What do you consider a giant starter?  2L well oxygenated should be the most you need, less if you use Jim's method.  I'd go with W-34/70 for ANY lager style, but NOT the dry version, it doesn't perform like the original liquid cultures (readily avaiable as WY2124 or WLP830.)
Pitching half a gallon of dme starter beer into 5.5 gallons of carefully-mashed and boiled wort just seems like a waste. If I crash the starter and decant it, it takes more like 6L, which is too big for me or my stir-plate.

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10
Yeast and Fermentation / Best Dry Yeast for a Märzen
« on: March 24, 2018, 07:11:07 PM »
I'm brewing up a Märzen and hate the giant starters needed for lagers, so I'm going to rehydrate two packs of dry yeast. My M84 experience has been great, but I'm open to suggestions.

Edit: Since I noticed the poll doesn't show up consistently on mobile, the choices are between:

S-189 Swiss Lager
M76 Bavarian Lager
M84 Bohemian Lager
W-34/70 Weihenstephan Lager

11
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: style for comparing yeasts
« on: March 24, 2018, 07:06:05 PM »
I agree with Denny, but I think the IBUs can be even lower and any pale base malt will do. Personally, I would use 2-row or a British style base malt, shoot for 1.040-1.055 and 20-30 ibus with no dry hops and no major whirlpool addition.

That said, I have run numerous yeast strain semi-experiments with standard American Amber Ale and Special Bitter recipes and have been pleased with the results.

12
All Grain Brewing / Re: Kwak and Chouffe troubleshooting
« on: March 05, 2018, 05:11:48 AM »
Hello all,
so I have been attempting a Kwak and Chouffe Clone by following and slightly modifying recipes I found on Beersmith but I'm not satisfied with the results.
Both are way too dark, the Kwak as a special flavor to it, which is hard to describe (I'm not too good at describing flavor, I need to learn more on that), and the Chouffe almost taste like honey to me.
Also the Chouffe does not have a good head retention.
Both these beers did not have a big Krausen during fermentation, which may be part of the problem.
I want to attach a few pictures, of the recipes I followed as well as of the final results.
I'm not able to find how to attach an image though, when I click insert image it just insert [img]... How does this work? Sorry for the noob question.
Any help and suggestions are welcomed, thanks and cheers!

You need to load the picture onto a photo hosting website like imgur and then add the direct link. Also, clone recipes from books are usually hot garbage. Without seeing the recipes you're talking about, we can't comment on why they would produce poor head retention (or other off flavors).

Without kn owing anything about your process, my instinct tells me that that "special flavor" is probably a yeast-driven flavor from under-pitching or from fermenting too warm. Remember that the fermentation temperature is 4-8 degrees warmer than the ambient temperature.

13
German breweries get some additional color from decoctions. If it matters to you, you could add a pinch of melanoidin malt.

14
My most common hop schedule:

FWH (not every time)
60 mins
10 mins (usually 1oz of cascade per 5-6 gal)
Whirlpool (30 mins at ~170F - 1-3 varieties)
Dry (now usually 3 oz per 5-6 gallons - 1-3 varieties)

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online shopping
« on: March 04, 2018, 07:24:56 PM »
I have so many good options close by, but I shop online at Williams Brewing for those items that aren't available/convenient locally (things like sinamar and brewtan b).

I buy most of my hops from Yakima Valley Hops.

I buy 95% of my non-hop ingredients and equipment from F. H. Steinbart (local) and sometimes buy base malt (especially imported stuff) from Brew Brothers, who are semi-local.

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