Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - ndcube

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 41
16
Beer Recipes / Re: I think my Schwarzbier is a Dunkel
« on: February 23, 2011, 09:15:24 AM »
Thanks for all the comments.

I'm submitting it to NHC as a Schwarzbier so I guess I find out in a couple months.

17
Kegging and Bottling / Re: slow conditioning?
« on: February 17, 2011, 09:06:34 AM »
And thank you for the tasty brew link, ndcube


Credit for that goes to hokerer.

18
Kegging and Bottling / Re: slow conditioning?
« on: February 17, 2011, 07:36:28 AM »
It seems like 2.5 oz of priming sugar is a little low too. not sure what style and how much carbonation you were after though. I often use around 4 oz of table sugar and I don't think the difference between corn and cane is that great.

I was just shooting for a generic "light" ale.  If you want to get more specific, it was a low IBU pale ale.  1.048 OG 1.015ish FG.  I moved the beer to a warmer location (~68-70F) and let it sit for another week.  Just doing that helped significantly.  I had one last night.  Thin head, but decent amount of carbonation, and it tasted great.     

I think I may increase the priming sugar in the next batch.  I did a lot of google searching about priming sugar for small batches and came up with ~2.1 ounces.  I put in 2.5 for the hell of it.  Maybe that's some misinformation.  I thought I might have read that  there's a way to calculate how much priming sugar you want, but I'm really not sure what I would be shooting for?  Volumes of CO2?  Or is that something different?

Volumes of CO2 measure how much CO2 is dissolved in the beer.  The more vols the fizzier your beer will be.  I don't know of any off hand since I stopped bottling but there are calulators you can search for.  Diffferent styles are carbonated to different levels.

Be careful of using too much priming sugar.  I've used up to 7oz in a 5 gal batch for a Belgian before.  With 7 I had a couple bottles explode.  I don't use more then 6.5 now (although I haven't bottle conditioned in a year since I started kegging).

Also, The tempature of the beer being bottled plays a role in how much CO2 is already dissolved. The calculator I used (Beersmith)  took this into account.

19
Kegging and Bottling / Re: slow conditioning?
« on: February 17, 2011, 07:29:13 AM »
It seems like 2.5 oz of priming sugar is a little low too. not sure what style and how much carbonation you were after though. I often use around 4 oz of table sugar and I don't think the difference between corn and cane is that great.

It's a 2.5 gal batch.

20
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Reusing lager yeast
« on: February 17, 2011, 06:02:07 AM »
I see a fairly significant decline in fermentation performance when the yeast has been sitting dormant for more than just a few (2-3) days. As a result I avoid keeping it in the fridge for longer than that. If it is older I would at least make a small starter with it so the yeast can get replenish its resources even though there won't be much growth.

Kai

This may be slight off topic...
If (for example) fermentation ends after 2 weeks but you leave the beer in the primary for 3 is that considered to already be past your 2-3 day mark?

21
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Reusing lager yeast
« on: February 17, 2011, 05:00:01 AM »
I don't pitch from a secondary container, the theory being that the least is less flocculent.  It's also been sitting around for a while.

I'll reuse yeast saved from a primary up to two weeks.  After that I make a starter from a scoop of the slurry.  I generally keep yeast for about 6 months for making starters before I pitch it (although I rarely end up using it).  I usually plan a string of batches to keep repitching fresh yeast.

It takes a lot of yeast for a lager and there might not be enough cells left in a yeast cake after a long period of time (especially since Thanksgiving).

I'm not sure about the yeast feeding thing.  I would think that it's dying off at the same rate it's growing, Plus there is the higher risk of contamination.

22
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Too warm to have added yeast?
« on: February 16, 2011, 05:29:54 PM »
Don't know how old you guys all are..... but at some point the thermostat in the wife is going to go apeshid. Whether she was always chilly or not before, she will go from bathing in sweat in January in a cold house to chilled to the bone in a July heatwave....

There is NO WAY to mechanically deal with this even if you wanted to.....

It goes away eventually, but in the meantime....strap in.

I have plans for a faux thermostat upstairs with the real one in the basement.

23
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Better bottles
« on: February 16, 2011, 11:37:48 AM »
Brewed last night, poured my just boiled 2 gallons of water into my 6 gallon better bottle, forgetting, of course, not to put water over 120* into one...

So, it deformed slightly (I'm happy to post pictures if needed). From my understanding, they're BPA-free, so it shouldn't be a concern on that front. Do I just have a deformed BB that will continually remind me to always add a little HERP with my DERP? Or have I ruined it?

:) Mistakes make it easy to remember a lesson, that's for sure. Just hope it's not too painful of a mistake.

The beer should be fine.  Gatorade is hot filled into PET bottles, the material of Better Bottles, and I haven't heard any complaints.  Apparently, the PET for Gatorade is more heat resistant than the one for Better Bottles.


Now I'm going to have to pour hot water in a gatorade bottle.

24
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Too warm to have added yeast?
« on: February 16, 2011, 05:50:32 AM »
The good ole' simple life...simpler is better. :)
The point being...cellar temps are fairly ideal for fermenting ales.  

Not my cellar in the winter.  Lager season!

25
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Other uses for CO2
« on: February 15, 2011, 12:11:04 PM »
Fill one ballon full of it at a kids b-day party and let them rack their brains over why one ballon falls faster than all the rest.

I did this with my son using baking soda and vinegar.  I was even amazed at how heavy the co2 balloon felt.  I knew it would be heavier than the air filled one, but it actually felt "heavy".

Yeah.  Also, If you notice, it only falls faster for a few inces until they both reach their termnal velocity.

26
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Better bottles
« on: February 15, 2011, 10:13:32 AM »
Brewed last night, poured my just boiled 2 gallons of water into my 6 gallon better bottle

Why did you need to pour 2 gallons of boiling water into a BB?  Was it to be used for topoff?

27
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Other uses for CO2
« on: February 15, 2011, 09:59:34 AM »
Fill one ballon full of it at a kids b-day party and let them rack their brains over why one ballon falls faster than all the rest.

28
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Too warm to have added yeast?
« on: February 15, 2011, 06:19:11 AM »
Room temp is also a little warm.


Not at my house, after the last heating bill we lowered from 65F to 60F.  With a cover or sweater its OK but I kind of feel like I'm being lagered.  Great ale fermenting temp, my beers are taking noticeably longer to carb up though.

I do generally use a swamp cooler without the evaporation, just as a sink to maintain a more constant temp during ferm.  Works like a charm in the summer.

Yikes.  My wife wouldn't hve that.  I brew based on my basement temps:
Upper 40's for lagering in the winter.
70ish for Belgian's in the summer (have to use a swamp cooler with ice packks to start).
There is a window in the spring/fall where it's good for other ales that I brew.

29
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Summertime Lagers
« on: February 15, 2011, 06:02:28 AM »
Got a SAL, Pils & and ligher version of an Alt in the lager fridge.  Gonna need some Tripel too!  Nice and dry.


30
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Too warm to have added yeast?
« on: February 15, 2011, 05:54:21 AM »
For future batches, you would have been bette off to let it sit overnight and pitch in the morning or later on the next day.  As long as things are sanitary another 12 hours or so won't hurt your wort.

Also, Fermenting in a tub of water to keep the temp consistent was a good suggestion.  The yeast will give off heat.  Room temp is also a little warm.

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 ... 41