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Messages - BairsBrewing

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: hop socks
« on: July 13, 2019, 03:16:24 AM »
I read an article where if you use too hot or too cold of water you get the weird flavors. The writer of said article said the sweet spot temp was between 170-180 degrees, so I opted for the middle ground. First time trying this but seems to have given good results this far.

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2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: hop socks
« on: July 13, 2019, 03:13:09 AM »
You could dry hop by making a hop tea, I tried this on my last batch and the hop aromas are pretty good, better than I've had in the past. All you need is a big French press and extra space in the keg/fermenter.


Care to go into detail on your "hop Tea" procedure?  Amount, type of hop (pellet/whole), temp of water, how long to steep, when you added the tea etc.  I've been researching the idea of hop teas and/or tinctures and I know there has to be a good way to do this.  I just can't find anything concrete.  Just like all things related to hop additions, everyone has 3 different ways to do it!   :D

Thanks in advance.
I used 2 oz of whole hops, citra, straight from the fridge. Boiled water in a pot for 2 minutes, let it cool to 175 degrees. Dumped the hops into my French press, poured the water onto said hops, put lid on and let it set for 20 minutes.  Slowly pressed the hops, 1 inch at a time with a 30 second rest between, continued until I could not press anymore. Poured hop tea into my fermenter.

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3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: hop socks
« on: July 11, 2019, 01:35:55 PM »
You could dry hop by making a hop tea, I tried this on my last batch and the hop aromas are pretty good, better than I've had in the past. All you need is a big French press and extra space in the keg/fermenter.

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4
The Pub / Re: Recipe planning
« on: July 10, 2019, 03:42:26 AM »
Does anyone else plan their brew year or is it just me and other folks just brew by the seat of their pants? 

I like to plan ahead so I can ensure a certain beer is on tap in a general timeframe for a holiday or event. I also like to alternate between light and dark beer. Lighter in the Summer, darker in the Winter. Here’s my plan thru the New Year.  Though the actual recipe may change a cpl months out, I generally know what I am going to brew well in advance.

The Centennial is in the serving fridge, the Hot Blonde is lagering, and the Citra is in the fermenter ready to be kegged this week. My numbering code is year.month brewed.brew number that month. I can already tell you the next beer in Feb (20.2.2.) will be a Stout so I’ll either have it or the Red on tap for St Pat’s.

What can I say. I am a goober.




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Definitely a brewnerd, but that's ok. I brew by the seat of my pants.  One day I will plan, LOL.

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5
All Things Food / Re: Breakfast sausage
« on: July 08, 2019, 12:16:29 AM »
Here’s a copycat Jimmy Dean Pork Sausage.  I haven’t made this one in a long time so can’t remember my tweaks. Probably more sage.

16 ounces (1 pound/450 g) ground pork.
1 teaspoon salt.
1/2 teaspoon dried parsley.
1/4 teaspoon rubbed sage (or more)
1/4 teaspoon fresh coarse ground black pepper.
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme (or more)
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
1/4 teaspoon coriander.


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Awesome! Do you mill the coriander or just leave it whole?

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6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: July 07, 2019, 03:43:15 AM »
My first Summer Shandy. Pretty damn good too!

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Looks good. Did you brew a beer and then add lemonade when pouring or brew it all together? I have never made one.
I added about three tablespoons of lemon and lime zest to the primary, after a vodka soak. I would likely go with more lemon zest next time, maybe a 2:1 ratio with a total of four Tbsp. Maybe more.

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7
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: July 07, 2019, 03:26:53 AM »
You ever have that beer that is pretty damn good?  Just a simple grain bill, simple hop bill, but the whole exceeds the sum of its parts?  I hate to see it go, but I can tell, she’s about ready to kick. Tschüss Amarillo Pale Ale. LOL




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That's the best type, easy to make, easy to drink,  easy to enjoy, sad to see it leave so soon..

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8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« on: July 07, 2019, 03:20:11 AM »
My first Summer Shandy. Pretty damn good too!

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9
All Things Food / Re: Breakfast sausage
« on: July 06, 2019, 09:33:37 PM »
Which cut? I've been wanting to do this for a long time. Made some deer pepperoni that t hi turned out pretty good, but I want to use a scratch made recipe to make some tweaks.

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10
All Things Food / Re: Breakfast sausage
« on: July 06, 2019, 08:37:17 PM »
What kind of meat?  Pork or beef?

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11
Equipment and Software / Re: Plate chiller cleaning
« on: July 02, 2017, 09:43:51 PM »
I had the same issue with my plate chiller.  Emailed the manufacturer and they sent me a pretty detailed process for cleaning. Here is the jist from Duda for my chiller..


As far as cleaning, backflushing with boiling water, and then using starsans before a brewing day to sanitize are our preferred methods. There are of course many other methods, but the rest seem to have both pros and cons:

PBW - I love PBW. Does a great job cleaning, but doesn't sanitize like starsans will. This is a good option if your filter didn't do a good enough job, or if you don't want to flush with boiling water.

Starsans after a day, rather than before for sanitizing - no point in this. Starsans won't clean as well as PBW will, and the risk you run into is some people like to let the exchanger just soak in starsans. Seeing as starsans is mildly acidic, this isn’t good for the long term life of the exchanger.

Lye solution - this is actually the method I prefer, submerging the exchanger in water and lye, but it is technically not recommended. The lye water will clean and sanitize better than any other chemical out there, but it can do some very minor damage to the chromium coating on the stainless steel, taking away a layer of its protection from corrosion. So you might have to replace the exchanger after 20 years if you go this route. This is also a much more dangerous chemical than the others mentioned, you want proper hazmat gear for this method. But its still the way I go, because the cleaning is second to none.

Baking - throw the unit in the oven, 400 degrees for 3 hours. This is my boss's preferred technique. No chemicals involved, absolutely sanitizes, burns out anything caught inside, and removes any fluids from inside the unit. My objection to this method is that some types of trub, if already inside, can get cooked into the unit and make things worse. “



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12
Ingredients / Re: Grain
« on: July 01, 2017, 05:52:08 AM »
I don't know where you're located, but some brewpubs or small breweries will sell grains at their cost as long as you buy a full sack.  It might be worth a drive if you could save on shipping.

I bought a 50 lb. bag of base malt at my favorite brew pub for $42.50 with no shipping involved. 

And some home brew clubs will do a bulk order once or twice a year at more favorable prices than you could normally get on line.

The malt I'm using is Cargill special pale which is used mostly for ales.

I'm south of Seattle. I'm in a Homebrew club but we were displaced when the HBS closed; they just found a new place but don't think they do grain orders. Didn't think about the brewery option, I'll definitely look into that.

You could become a member/owner of Flying Bike Coop Brewery and get a bag for $40
What about shipping?

13
Ingredients / Re: Grain
« on: June 30, 2017, 03:36:14 PM »
I don't know where you're located, but some brewpubs or small breweries will sell grains at their cost as long as you buy a full sack.  It might be worth a drive if you could save on shipping.

I bought a 50 lb. bag of base malt at my favorite brew pub for $42.50 with no shipping involved. 

And some home brew clubs will do a bulk order once or twice a year at more favorable prices than you could normally get on line.

The malt I'm using is Cargill special pale which is used mostly for ales.

I'm south of Seattle. I'm in a Homebrew club but we were displaced when the HBS closed; they just found a new place but don't think they do grain orders. Didn't think about the brewery option, I'll definitely look into that.

14
Ingredients / Re: Grain
« on: June 30, 2017, 12:14:43 AM »
I buy from MoreBeer online. They sell all grains at decent prices in 55, 50, 10, 5, and 1 lb sizes. And, any from 10 lbs. on down ship for free provided you order $59 worth of supplies. I buy in bulk which gives me flexibility to brew whatever I feel like on any given day and keeps the cost of my beer way down.
That's where I was leaning towards. I used to use Breiss only. What do you use?

15
Ingredients / Grain
« on: June 29, 2017, 06:58:33 PM »
So my LHBS closed because they extended too much credit to local breweries who didn't pay up.  Sad too because they had just expanded;  not enough capital I'm sure.  Where do you get grain? Looking took buy a base malt for multiple varieties and specialties for color/body. Suggestions?

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