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Messages - morticaixavier

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31
All Things Food / Re: Growing food - The Garden Thread
« on: May 04, 2015, 03:32:41 PM »
had to look up Hammerschlagen.

32
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Law of partial pressures
« on: May 04, 2015, 03:11:50 PM »
If you purge many times you can get to a very low level of O2.

The amount that will go back in due to the partial pressure depends on the diffusion trough the rubber gaskets, not zero but pretty low I think.

On bottles there are better crown seal liners that let less O2 diffuse in. Sierra Nevada changed back around 2008 to those liners, but to be effective they had to go with pry off as that gave a higher clamp load to make it all work.

but when you open the PRV it's no longer a case of how much enters past the gaskets the pressures will equalize very quickly between outside and inside through the PRV. because the pressure imbalance inside the keg is only the co2 (39PSI inside vs whatever tiny pressure outside) but the o2 won't travel because the partial pressure inside the keg is equal to that outside.

33
Kegging and Bottling / Law of partial pressures
« on: May 04, 2015, 02:55:50 PM »
This has been nibbling away at my brain for a while now. I purge kegs by filling them to the brim with star san and pushing it out with co2 but I don't transfer under pressure because I don't have pressurized fermenters. I know a lot of folks that just fill and purge the headspace and I've done that as well and I've never had a problem with oxidation. But I suspect this is because of active yeast more than having actually purged the keg effectively. So the other day I say down and flexed my Google-fu. The law of partial pressures states that the sum of the pressures of each distinct gas in a given volume equals the total pressure in that volume. I interpret this to mean that if I were to pressurize a keg to 10psi with normal air there would be about 2psi of o2 pressure in the keg.

Assuming this is correct, and I'm not a scientist so it may be wrong already, if I have a keg with normal air at 2 psi or whatever normal atmospheric pressure was at the time I have about 0.4 psi of o2. Now I can pressurize the keg with pure co2 to 10 or 20 or even 40 psi but there will still be 0.4 psi of o2 there.

The accepted wisdom is that if you then dump that pressure you end up with a significantly reduced amount of o2 because the 20% in normal air was diluted by all the pure co2 and when you released the pressure the o2 left at a rates proportional to the total pressure inside the keg.

But the partial pressure of o2 outside the keg and inside the keg will equalize no matter what so you will always have 0.4psi of o2 inside the keg. Am I missing something? Or is purging the keg completely useless?

34
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: NHC SQLite Dataset
« on: May 04, 2015, 02:34:22 PM »
That was pretty interesting. Only 2 past winners have use SafAle yeast? That seems surprising to me.
More likely only 2 past winkers calmed or SafAle specifically. Look for S-05 and you'll get a lot more hits I suspect.
Winkers or wankers? I kid.
I have got to start paying attention to what autocorrect days I said. Hopefully everyone got the point.

35
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: NHC SQLite Dataset
« on: May 04, 2015, 07:13:42 AM »
That was pretty interesting. Only 2 past winners have use SafAle yeast? That seems surprising to me.
More likely only 2 past winkers calmed or SafAle specifically. Look for S-05 and you'll get a lot more hits I suspect.

36
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Crabbie's
« on: May 01, 2015, 06:21:38 AM »
I didn't mean to sound snobbish. I'm sure this is a tasty beverage. I like cider, and have even had an alcholic lemonade or two that were pretty good. Ginger is a great flavor in beer as well.


37
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Crabbie's
« on: April 30, 2015, 10:15:33 AM »
I thought it was a "malt beverage" aka malt based, but with as little malt/beer flavor as possible.

I'd start with a light American lager recipe, use as much rice as possible and basically brew it like a lager.

malt beverages are based on malt sugar derived alcohol but to describe it in any way as beer (as in having hops, or really any bitterness) is wrong.

38
Ingredients / Re: Cocculus indicus substitute
« on: April 30, 2015, 10:13:24 AM »
Maybe some wormwood? Just be careful, that stuff is nasty bitter.

a friend of mine puts  alittle bit of wormwood in his pale ale and IPA. it adds a really braceing bitterness that's complimentary but different than hop bitterness... and the green fairies are entertaining too ;)
Jonathan, what does a little look like measurement wise in a typical 5 gallon batch if I ever feel the need to try this out?

this friend actually plays that particular card pretty close to his chest but I would guess it's in the single digit grams per 5 gallons

39
Ingredients / Re: dried sour cherries
« on: April 30, 2015, 08:40:17 AM »
Indeed, we want the pits. No tart cherry beer shall be brewed on Belgian soil that doth not have the pits. So no puree. Does anyone have a link to affordable good quality preferably unoiled dried unpitted tart cherries?
How soon is cherry season there? Can you wait? I pretty much do any brewing and mead making with fruit based on local availability of nice ripe fruit.
EDIT: Just remembered you will be adding cherries next year. Just wait until next years local cherry season.

This.

I suspect you will not find any unpitted dried cherries as it would make the drying process really hard. All of the dried cherries I have ever seen are pitted and split. I've been wrong before though.

40
Ingredients / Re: dried sour cherries
« on: April 30, 2015, 08:01:07 AM »
Hm, there seems to be a consensus growing amongst the personae in my head that it would be kind of silly to import American tart cherry puree into Belgium.  :P Also, no dried cherries coated with oil. So instead we are thinking of using fresh Belgian cherries: make the base beer, add brett, funk, critters etc., let it do its thing for a year, add fresh cherries in the summer of next year,  wait another 3 months or so, then bottle.

If you are after supplication you should try to source dried cherries. The flavor or dried fruit, in my opinion, is very different than that of fresh. but you know as well as I do that a sour beer brewed with fresh tart cherries is fantastic and you would not be dissapointed.

Lot's of folks are fold of the purees but I can offer one reason that whole fruit would be better; the pit. That little stone will add some really interesting flavors especially after a year or more. If RR is using dried cherries they probably don't have the pit so again, if you want supplication keep looking for those dried cherries.

on the oil front, I'm not sure it would be a problem. you are adding the cherries to cold beer. the oil is not going dissolve. it might float on top but that's not a problem if you rack carefully to leave it behind. People add chocolate and nuts to beer all the time and the oil doesn't seem to be a problem. Dry hops area adding oil to cold beer and that doesn't seem to hurt head retention in any way.

so to summarize:

if you want it to be close to supplication use dried cherries If you are not as concerned about that, use local fresh cherries. either way, make sure they are tart cherries because sweet cherries do not have the flavor complexity that I like to see in a cherry beer.

41
Ingredients / Re: Cocculus indicus substitute
« on: April 30, 2015, 07:53:15 AM »
Maybe some wormwood? Just be careful, that stuff is nasty bitter.

a friend of mine puts  alittle bit of wormwood in his pale ale and IPA. it adds a really braceing bitterness that's complimentary but different than hop bitterness... and the green fairies are entertaining too ;)

42
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cloudy lager after kegging
« on: April 30, 2015, 07:51:53 AM »
coiul dyou have left some starsan in the keg? I bet it wouldn't take much to make it all cloud up. you might not even notice a taste difference.

43
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Secondary ferementer help
« on: April 30, 2015, 07:45:17 AM »
It's unlikely that there is a problem.

Generally, if you are going to move to secondary, you should wait till you know the fermentation is complete. You know this because two gravity readings several days apart will be the same.

That said, 1.011 sounds in line with what i would expect. I suspect there was a temp change and/or the hops provided nucleation sites for co2 bubbles so more co2 is coming out of solution.

That said, keep an eye on the gravity and if it keeps dropping it means either it wasn't done when you moved it and now it's finishing up in which case, yay! or you picked up a more attenuative yeast somewhere along the way in which case, well you'll have to wait and see, might still be yay!

Going forward, you can skip the secondary most of the time. in this  case with the pliny and the heavy dry hopping getting the beer off the yeast first can be beneficial but most of the time it's more effort for no real return and offers some rick of infection or oxidation.

I moved a Belgian from primary to secondary too soon while fermentation was still ongoing. I don't know what I was thinking. Now I'm worried fermentation will not complete as it has significantly slowed now. Could I just add more yeast to the secondary or am i stuck?

as long as the gravity is still dropping I would let it ride. It's hard to restart a stuck fermentation because any yeast you add will generally be overwhelmed by the alchohol and low pH. You can get a big pitch together, either get fresh slurry from a local brewery if you can or make a big fresh starter and pitch at high krausen and it might work. But if gravity is still dropping just wait it out.

44
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Secondary ferementer help
« on: April 29, 2015, 09:39:36 AM »
Ok, cool. Thank you for the feed back. I'll do another reading later today and see if I am still at 1.011. Greatly appreciate it!

I've read a lot of posts saying to skip the secondary. I still doing that going forward. I submitted one of my early beers into a competition (at a friends urging) just for feedback, and one of the comments was "tastes like it sat on the trub too long" which is why I moved this one (not wanting to ruin a good beer). I'll skip that in the future.

I wouldn't put too much stock on one judges comments. We try but we are only human and make mistakes. The flavor that would be caused by too long on the yeast cake would be brothy, meaty, soy sauce like flavors and I've personally never experienced them in homebrew. Not to say it can't happen but within reason it's unlikely to happen to you.

as I said though, with a big hop driven beer like this where dry hopping it an important part of the finished flavor profile from a brewer who has expressed that he likes to dry off away from yeast I would consider sticking with a secondary step, just be very careful and, if you have the ability, purge the receiving container with co2.

45
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Secondary ferementer help
« on: April 29, 2015, 08:27:21 AM »
It's unlikely that there is a problem.

Generally, if you are going to move to secondary, you should wait till you know the fermentation is complete. You know this because two gravity readings several days apart will be the same.

That said, 1.011 sounds in line with what i would expect. I suspect there was a temp change and/or the hops provided nucleation sites for co2 bubbles so more co2 is coming out of solution.

That said, keep an eye on the gravity and if it keeps dropping it means either it wasn't done when you moved it and now it's finishing up in which case, yay! or you picked up a more attenuative yeast somewhere along the way in which case, well you'll have to wait and see, might still be yay!

Going forward, you can skip the secondary most of the time. in this  case with the pliny and the heavy dry hopping getting the beer off the yeast first can be beneficial but most of the time it's more effort for no real return and offers some rick of infection or oxidation.

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