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Messages - morticaixavier

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3331
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Cooling my all grain wort
« on: August 15, 2013, 11:04:34 AM »
A cheaper option is to buy 5 - 6 1 liter bottles of water, remove labels, freeze solid, sanitize and drop in the hot wort. You should be able to get 5 gallons of wort chilled quite quickly this way with a little stirring with a sanitized spoon.

No-Chill has also been done with little reported problems. In this method you get an airtight heat resistant container (traditionally done with brand new plastic fuel cans) as soon as the boil is over run off into this container and seal. Let cool overnight.

**EDIT**

However it is important to remember that an ambient temp of 70-80 is still quite high for most fermentations. You could do a saison at that temp but just about any other ale you are going to want to figure out a way to chill down to the low 60's and maintain that general range (60-68) for at least the first 3-5 days of fermentation

3332
Ingredients / Re: home grown cider
« on: August 15, 2013, 09:42:35 AM »
On anything bigger than a very small scale you are going to want to rent a cider mill set up. it's a grinder and a press. Usually one rinses the apples well in sanitizer and then grinds and presses.

3333
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Am I being impatient?
« on: August 15, 2013, 08:10:42 AM »

So I believe I finally figured all this out but have  additional questions:

This last batch I both bottled and kegged. Both the keg and the bottles have been conditioned and refrigerated for the same amount of time at the same temperature. My bottles are pouring crystal clear, commercial quality pours. My keg is tapping cloudy and it is not simply chill haze.

I am still getting a little too much foam and I have 5' of liquid line. My taps are approximately 3' to the center of the keg. For this issue I am assuming I should lengthen the lines, perhaps to 7-8'? The pour is kind of quick and the lines are 3/16 ID. They are refrigerated from keg to tower completely.

I noticed with my first keg that the dip tube goes basically all the way down almost into the little recess in the bottom of the keg. Is it possible that I am continuously sucking up trub each time I tap? Should I have cut the dip tube a little shorter to leave a little more space and avoid this suck up of sediment?

Appreciate the continued help!

more line or less push should help with the foamy pour. I suspect you are correct about the cloudiness. it should clear up eventually.

I would have thought so to on the cloudiness but it has been almost 2 weeks at 39F like an extended cold crash and still cloudy, even after consecutive pours, that's why I asked about dip tube length. I don't think line length would really fix that issue as the beer in the lines is cloudy as well.

line length is for the foamy not the cloudy. you can shorten the dip tube but I find that eventually the sediment clears if its that. I suppose the keg could be infected so new sediment is being deposited all the time. or there is just a lot in which case shorten the tube and/or transfer to a clean keg.

3334
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Am I being impatient?
« on: August 15, 2013, 07:30:18 AM »
So I believe I finally figured all this out but have  additional questions:

This last batch I both bottled and kegged. Both the keg and the bottles have been conditioned and refrigerated for the same amount of time at the same temperature. My bottles are pouring crystal clear, commercial quality pours. My keg is tapping cloudy and it is not simply chill haze.

I am still getting a little too much foam and I have 5' of liquid line. My taps are approximately 3' to the center of the keg. For this issue I am assuming I should lengthen the lines, perhaps to 7-8'? The pour is kind of quick and the lines are 3/16 ID. They are refrigerated from keg to tower completely.

I noticed with my first keg that the dip tube goes basically all the way down almost into the little recess in the bottom of the keg. Is it possible that I am continuously sucking up trub each time I tap? Should I have cut the dip tube a little shorter to leave a little more space and avoid this suck up of sediment?

Appreciate the continued help!

more line or less push should help with the foamy pour. I suspect you are correct about the cloudiness. it should clear up eventually.

3335
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dark colored starter
« on: August 15, 2013, 07:20:01 AM »
are you sure it wasn't powdered graphite? Coal Dust?

3336
Beer Travel / Re: Boston
« on: August 14, 2013, 09:28:21 PM »
Brewery tours are fine, but there are lots of good craft beer bars in Boston - I would recommend Bukowski's, Deep Ellum, The Lower Depths, and the Sunset Grill - There is a Yardhouse near Fenway, but that's a different kind of crowd then you'll find in the other bars.  There is a brewpub called Boston Beer Works near Fenway, too - there are several brewpubs outside of Boston - Watch City in Waltham MA, John Harvard's in Framingham, British Beer Company; a restaurant in Worcester called Peppercorn's is home to Wormtown Brewery - I recommend it highly - If you want to travel, Cape Ann Brewing in Cape Ann on the North Shore is a brewpub on the harbor (you can get your Perfect Storm fix there, too)  Check out Beer Advocate for lots more info on breweries, etc in and around Boston and MA generally. Cheers!

+1 to bukowskis. a little aggressively hipster but great beer list

3337
All Grain Brewing / Re: 1st time messing with water chemistry
« on: August 14, 2013, 09:27:05 PM »
+1 to all of what Mort said. Bru'nWater takes the guesswork out.

So after leaving tab 1 and 2 blank in BrunWater (because I am using RO), and entering in my additions of gypsum and calcium chloride in tab 3 (Water Adjustment), and inputting my recipe in Mash Acidification it gives an estimated pH of 5.2. So does that mean I should leave it be at that point? No need to add the acidulated malt right?

sounds right. Just to check did you set the dilution % to 100 and the dilution water to RO?

3338
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Have I botched my barleywine?
« on: August 14, 2013, 09:23:13 PM »
It's meaty if it tastes like beef broth. If you're not sure that's what your beer tasted like then it's probably not an autolysis issue. Honestly I would be surprised if you figured out a way to make autolysis show up in six month beer. Most of my bottles sit around 80F during the summer (read: half the year) and I have bottles that are way older than six months old without showing signs of autolysis.

If it is that warm in your apartment and you ferment without any temperature control, and under-pitched, then it is most likely that you fermented the beer outside of the preferred range for the yeast you used, resulting in some off flavors due to yeast stress and/or esters from the warm fermentation. Not the end of the world.

The fermentation happened at 70 degrees, because it was done from about January to March, so that probably wasn't the issue. The under-pitching concerned me the most.
If the ambient temp was ~70 the actual temp on a big beer could be as high as 80

3339
All Grain Brewing / Re: 1st time messing with water chemistry
« on: August 14, 2013, 03:48:49 PM »
best advice I can give you is to download bru'n water. read the instructions and have at. I build from RO and keep Calcium Chloride, Gypsum, Lactic Acide 88%, and pickling lime on hand. Additionally my wife keeps Epsom salts on hand.

Most of the time I use the amber/yellow/dark malty/bitter profiles and mostly just try to get >50 ppm calcium in there. I use the lactic when needed (most of the time when making lighter beers) to get my pH down (predicted pH, not measured). I use pickling lime when needed (Rarely) to bring pH up in very dark beers.

I go back and forth with acidifying the sparge water and don't think it matters much with RO.

I would suggest getting a gram scale though. makes it easier when the water recipe calls for 2.3 grams of gypsum

**EDIT**

to add, I don't bother with acid malt because it's just another variable and 88% lactic acid is much easier to keep around since a tiny little bottle lasts and lasts and does not go stale while acid malt is bulky, and will eventually go stale. but that's just me.

3340
Equipment and Software / Re: Has anybody used one of these?
« on: August 14, 2013, 01:40:18 PM »
A pump would also solve the height problem.

Yeah, for getting wort in.  I don't know that I'd want to pump finished beer with most of the pumps we use.
No? No good?

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 4

Most pumps, like the March 809 that most homebrewers use, will introduce air into the wort.

you would want a peristaltic pump I would think. pushing with co2 is going to be way easier though.

3341
Beer Travel / Re: Boston
« on: August 14, 2013, 08:27:53 AM »
Check out Cambridge Brewing Company for sure. It's been a while since I was in boston but that was the best around when I lived there last. I don't think Pretty Things has a location to visit but pick some of their beers up. they do some good stuff.

3342
Equipment and Software / Re: Has anybody used one of these?
« on: August 14, 2013, 08:22:50 AM »
OK this one says it is pressurized for CO2 pumping. Does that mean I could just hook up my CO2 bottle and deliver it to my keg or bottling bucket instead of shelling out another $150 for a pump or $130 for leg extensions?

yes.

you keep the pressure around 3 psi and you are good to go.

3343
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Who Uses a Blow-Off Tube and When?
« on: August 14, 2013, 08:17:13 AM »
Weizen yeasts and Belgian yeasts produce copious amounts of krausen.  Plus I think the viscosity of big beers contributes to more krausen formation.

I don't generally use one, instead I manage by providing appropriate head space.

I have a question though, do you think a  blowoff provides any benefits other than preventing messes?  Specifically, does it help you get rid of braunhefe that would otherwise fall back and affect beer taste?

only if you intentionally limit headspace. but then you are potentially blowing off a lot of good yeast at the same time.

3344
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« on: August 14, 2013, 08:13:56 AM »
I will be using this yeast for a Saison this week and I'm concerned with fusel production.  I agree that an elevated fermentation temp is required to produce the esters and phenols that are characteristic of the yeast, but I've had far too many beers in judging that display fusel alcohols...much to the dismay of my head the next morning.  Many of those beers were not Belgians and the yeasts probably aren't suited to high temp.  But can this yeast be relied upon to avoid fusel production if fermented at 78 to 80 F? 

I'm going to have to heat my fermentation chamber to achieve that elevated temp, so its no problem to moderate the temp a bit.

I got good complex flavor results pitching at ~64 and letting it rise no higher than ~74. lots of lemon. some spice and funk, no fusels that I could detect (and I get wicked headaches from fusels)

3345
All Things Food / Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
« on: August 13, 2013, 03:36:56 PM »
Well, gosh, I didn't think about that. But I'll post my results Saturday.

you will probably be fine refrigerating them. lactic bacteria don't like the cold.

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