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Messages - morticaixavier

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3496
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Have I botched my barleywine?
« on: August 14, 2013, 09:23:13 PM »
It's meaty if it tastes like beef broth. If you're not sure that's what your beer tasted like then it's probably not an autolysis issue. Honestly I would be surprised if you figured out a way to make autolysis show up in six month beer. Most of my bottles sit around 80F during the summer (read: half the year) and I have bottles that are way older than six months old without showing signs of autolysis.

If it is that warm in your apartment and you ferment without any temperature control, and under-pitched, then it is most likely that you fermented the beer outside of the preferred range for the yeast you used, resulting in some off flavors due to yeast stress and/or esters from the warm fermentation. Not the end of the world.

The fermentation happened at 70 degrees, because it was done from about January to March, so that probably wasn't the issue. The under-pitching concerned me the most.
If the ambient temp was ~70 the actual temp on a big beer could be as high as 80

3497
All Grain Brewing / Re: 1st time messing with water chemistry
« on: August 14, 2013, 03:48:49 PM »
best advice I can give you is to download bru'n water. read the instructions and have at. I build from RO and keep Calcium Chloride, Gypsum, Lactic Acide 88%, and pickling lime on hand. Additionally my wife keeps Epsom salts on hand.

Most of the time I use the amber/yellow/dark malty/bitter profiles and mostly just try to get >50 ppm calcium in there. I use the lactic when needed (most of the time when making lighter beers) to get my pH down (predicted pH, not measured). I use pickling lime when needed (Rarely) to bring pH up in very dark beers.

I go back and forth with acidifying the sparge water and don't think it matters much with RO.

I would suggest getting a gram scale though. makes it easier when the water recipe calls for 2.3 grams of gypsum

**EDIT**

to add, I don't bother with acid malt because it's just another variable and 88% lactic acid is much easier to keep around since a tiny little bottle lasts and lasts and does not go stale while acid malt is bulky, and will eventually go stale. but that's just me.

3498
Equipment and Software / Re: Has anybody used one of these?
« on: August 14, 2013, 01:40:18 PM »
A pump would also solve the height problem.

Yeah, for getting wort in.  I don't know that I'd want to pump finished beer with most of the pumps we use.
No? No good?

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 4

Most pumps, like the March 809 that most homebrewers use, will introduce air into the wort.

you would want a peristaltic pump I would think. pushing with co2 is going to be way easier though.

3499
Beer Travel / Re: Boston
« on: August 14, 2013, 08:27:53 AM »
Check out Cambridge Brewing Company for sure. It's been a while since I was in boston but that was the best around when I lived there last. I don't think Pretty Things has a location to visit but pick some of their beers up. they do some good stuff.

3500
Equipment and Software / Re: Has anybody used one of these?
« on: August 14, 2013, 08:22:50 AM »
OK this one says it is pressurized for CO2 pumping. Does that mean I could just hook up my CO2 bottle and deliver it to my keg or bottling bucket instead of shelling out another $150 for a pump or $130 for leg extensions?

yes.

you keep the pressure around 3 psi and you are good to go.

3501
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Who Uses a Blow-Off Tube and When?
« on: August 14, 2013, 08:17:13 AM »
Weizen yeasts and Belgian yeasts produce copious amounts of krausen.  Plus I think the viscosity of big beers contributes to more krausen formation.

I don't generally use one, instead I manage by providing appropriate head space.

I have a question though, do you think a  blowoff provides any benefits other than preventing messes?  Specifically, does it help you get rid of braunhefe that would otherwise fall back and affect beer taste?

only if you intentionally limit headspace. but then you are potentially blowing off a lot of good yeast at the same time.

3502
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« on: August 14, 2013, 08:13:56 AM »
I will be using this yeast for a Saison this week and I'm concerned with fusel production.  I agree that an elevated fermentation temp is required to produce the esters and phenols that are characteristic of the yeast, but I've had far too many beers in judging that display fusel alcohols...much to the dismay of my head the next morning.  Many of those beers were not Belgians and the yeasts probably aren't suited to high temp.  But can this yeast be relied upon to avoid fusel production if fermented at 78 to 80 F? 

I'm going to have to heat my fermentation chamber to achieve that elevated temp, so its no problem to moderate the temp a bit.

I got good complex flavor results pitching at ~64 and letting it rise no higher than ~74. lots of lemon. some spice and funk, no fusels that I could detect (and I get wicked headaches from fusels)

3503
All Things Food / Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
« on: August 13, 2013, 03:36:56 PM »
Well, gosh, I didn't think about that. But I'll post my results Saturday.

you will probably be fine refrigerating them. lactic bacteria don't like the cold.

3504
All Things Food / Re: Pickles and other fermented foods
« on: August 13, 2013, 03:27:31 PM »
And back to the topic of fermented pickles, is it possible to make a sweet fermented pickle (i.e., gherkin-style) or would the additional sugar encourage unwanted bugs to join the party?

I think you could add the sugar at the same time as adding the vinegar, but I'm no pickle expert,

I'm making some sweet pickles now. If they turn out I'll post recipe saturday. No vinegar for my pickles. Salt water brine and natural fermentation.

Won't the sugar ferment out?

I would expect so. I would think you would need to either refridgerate to halt the lactic fermentation or can/pasturize

3505
Ingredients / Re: fruit puree
« on: August 13, 2013, 11:31:40 AM »
What are they going to pair it with?

This will be paired with the salad course.

I wonder about reserving the puree to be served with the beer instead? I envision champagne flutes with a teaspoon or so of raspberry puree at the bottom and a bright golden ale on top, maybe with a Belgian yeast?

3506
Hop Growing / Re: Almost that time again
« on: August 12, 2013, 05:31:15 PM »
nice

3507
Ingredients / Re: Ingredients from Walmart!
« on: August 12, 2013, 05:30:05 PM »
How about malting your own quinoa? Just a thought, don't know if the seeds would sprout, and would be expensive.

I had limited success with this. the seeds sprout like mad. in fact one of the hardest parts (aside from the fact that there is only limited alpha amylase activity) is STOPPING them soon enough. They are ready to kiln within 12-18 hours after the first soak.

In my experiment I got about 60% AA with a massive overpitch of us-05. I have yet to repeat the experiment but it's on the roster.

3508
All Grain Brewing / Re: Who's Brewing Today? s
« on: August 12, 2013, 05:16:41 PM »
The grain bill will have to be some combination of munich, pale, and pils. I have some various character malts hanging around but I don't know if I'll use any of those. Maybe some dark crystal and then some simple sugar to dry it out?

I've been looking at a pale ale recipe with cane sugar to dry it out.  I haven't brewed with sugar yet, just a lower temp mash to help get a drier fermentation and US-05 or 1056.  I would think that sugar should open up more yeast options.  I'm curious as to how this works out for you.

Anything with centennial and or goldings just has to be good!

You can get a plenty dry enough APA without sugar, especially using 1056/001/05. Mashing fairly low (150-152F)and using gypsum (sulfate) will dry an APA nicely if that's what you're after. Sugar does come in handy to dry things out when brewing a IIPA where reaching a high OG with malt alone could leave a very malty ,even cloying finish. I like dry APAs and IPAs too. I highly recommend getting Martin's Bru'nWater and using the Pale Ale profile. Together with the low mash temp, it'll get you there.

yeah I don't think I would use sugar on an APA,  maybe an AIPA but probably not, and IIPA for sure, it's almost a must. Thing about british pale ales, particularly the really sessionable ones is that they tend to have a lot of character malt in an attempt to give what might otherwise be a somewhat thin and boring beer some... well... character. When you get a lot of crystal malt (particularly british medium or dark crystal malts) in a beer the flavor can start to get cloying particularly when the carbonation is very low as it is with cask conditioned beers. But by adding back some simple sugars you can get that sweet and flavourful character from the crystal malts while still having a very drinkable light bodied beer.

It seems somewhat counter-intuitive as we are all taught that you limit your crystal malts to prevent overly sweet beer and you only use simple sugar in big beers and/or Belgian beers but by playing each ingredient off the other you can really do some interesting stuff.

3509
All Grain Brewing / Re: Who's Brewing Today? s
« on: August 12, 2013, 03:57:38 PM »
The grain bill will have to be some combination of munich, pale, and pils. I have some various character malts hanging around but I don't know if I'll use any of those. Maybe some dark crystal and then some simple sugar to dry it out?

I've been looking at a pale ale recipe with cane sugar to dry it out.  I haven't brewed with sugar yet, just a lower temp mash to help get a drier fermentation and US-05 or 1056.  I would think that sugar should open up more yeast options.  I'm curious as to how this works out for you.

Anything with centennial and or goldings just has to be good!

oh sugar to dry a beer out is great. I do that all the time. my big beers all get a healthy dose of simple sugars. even with a 148 mash temp a big 1.100 barley wine is not going to finish down around 1.010 without some simple sugars (or at least I have never made it do that).

3510
All Grain Brewing / Re: Who's Brewing Today? s
« on: August 12, 2013, 03:00:16 PM »
Think I might spend some time planning out a kitchen sink pale ale. I haven't done a really hoppy brew in a while and I have three partial sacks of grain that have begun to approach the 'been sitting around a little to long' point. Plus I have ~ a lb of centennial that I got at NHC and I want to use those up. For a little complexity I will toss in some hallertau and maybe some goldings (if I have any in the freezer).

The grain bill will have to be some combination of munich, pale, and pils. I have some various character malts hanging around but I don't know if I'll use any of those. Maybe some dark crystal and then some simple sugar to dry it out?

I guy in my club that does amazing 'real ale' cask conditioned stuff swears by this with session beers and I can't argue to strongly against him as his ordinary bitter rocks.

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