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Messages - morticaixavier

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3526
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Samuel Adams Ruby Mild
« on: August 29, 2013, 10:22:27 AM »
I have had Hardy and Hanson's Cursed Galleon Mild at 5.5% in Nottingham. Might not be brewed anymore.

Then there is Sarah Hughes Dark Ruby Mild at 6.0% ABV.

Those are extreme for today, but there were much stronger molds in Victorian times.

indeed a XXX mild could run 1.100+ for OG

3527
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How low can you go?
« on: August 29, 2013, 10:21:00 AM »
Good stuff! I think that thinking about it in extremes helps gain an understanding of the whole process.
Would you do a step mash? Lowest temperature? Won't enzymes continue to break down sugars by simply mashing for a longer time? How long til enzymes are denatured?

I would aim for a mash temp of 153 or so. this is in the sweet spot for Alpha activity and on the high end but not too high for beta activity. Mash a LOOOOOOONG time. like overnight or for a day or two. You might get some funk going in the mash (sour mash). try to keep mash temps in the low 150's high 140's the whole time. Use some 6 row for added enzymatic power.

I don't thing the enzymes will denature unless the temp gets too high or the pH gets too low. If the temp drops the activity will go down. But both beta and alpha amylase are dextrin limited. so when there are no more sugar chains of the right shape for them more time will not mean more conversion.

3528
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How low can you go?
« on: August 29, 2013, 09:43:38 AM »
I guess I should have filed this under "all grain". More attenuative yeast is the obvious answer especially posted under "yeast and fermentation ". How would one mash to achieve a wort that is 100% fermentable with no long chain sugars?

I'm not sure that it is practically possible. The alpha amylase will leave behind one fermentable bit and one less fermentable bit. The Beta amylase will nibble off the end of the less fermentable bit but still leave a less fermentable bit behind.

The molecules that each enzyme is looking for, once the enzyme has acted on it, will always leave behind an unfermentable bit (This is based on my limited understanding of amylase activity and perhaps others can correct/confirm my thoughts).

There are likely other enzymes one could ADD to the mash to increase fermentability though.

3529
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: How low can you go?
« on: August 29, 2013, 09:05:04 AM »
Add some Brett.

+1 I think that without some very specialized yeast there will always be some longer chain sugars that will not ferment out. By the way are you talking about 100% Apparent Attenuation? ie. a finished gravity of 1.000? I've done that with the belle saison but I added some honey.

100% true attenuation would land you below 1. How much below would depend on the worts starting gravity

3530
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: cleaning and passifying question
« on: August 28, 2013, 08:54:35 AM »
Is it really necessary to passify stainless steel?

it can get pretty rowdy

3531
Equipment and Software / Re: Devising a Mash Tun for One Gallon Batches
« on: August 28, 2013, 08:54:12 AM »
That will probably work but I gotta ask, what's there to deal with with BIAB. you've got to clean out your mash tun as well right?

If I were you I would go BIAB get a nice heavy duty colander that will rest on top of your boil kettle nicely and you can just lift the bag out and put it in the colander to drain while you start the boil. ideal for you situation I would think.

3532
Beer Recipes / Re: Belgian IPA
« on: August 28, 2013, 08:50:47 AM »
my guess is that the OG is a typo. maybe supposed to be 1.057?

3533
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dry yeast question
« on: August 27, 2013, 03:34:55 PM »
[...] Reusing dry yeast is somewhat trickier, I tend to pitch almost a third of a yeast cake for ales and almost half a yeast cake for lagers (harvesting the yeast cake at about up to a month from original pitch date).  [...]

what makes you say that reusing dry yeast is any different than reusing 'wet' yeast? by the time you are reusing I would think that the population is mostly new and those cells that have survived from the original population have used up any reserves given them during the drying process so there should be zero difference at that point.

3534
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: More Beer in Pittsbugh
« on: August 27, 2013, 07:53:13 AM »
So when did Morebeer open a warehouse in Pittsburgh? This is great news! I love their free shipping for $60 orders, but could never order yeast from California. Does anybody know if it's just a shipping warehouse or is it a store as well?

isn't your yeast coming from California anyway? or Oregon?

** actually lallemand is all over the place**

3535
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dry yeast question
« on: August 27, 2013, 07:42:44 AM »
You don't need to pitch extra S-05 because you didn't rehydrate.  I go by my OG - if I get ~ 1.065 or higher I"ll  use maybe an extra 1/2 packet, because of the gravity not because of sprinkling it dry.

Awesome!  Now this answer takes me here......

What information is available that says viability is less/more/same when dry yeast-ing?  The info I have run across indicates that there is loss of as much as half the viable cells doing this. I think I read this in the "Yeast" book.  There also seems to be a difference in yeast cell count from the manufacturers and what is out there in the pitch rate calculators.



Use good sanitation and there's nothing wrong with rehydrating if you want.  I just haven't found an advantage to doing so - no loss of attenuation, no stuck fermentations ever by sprinkling on top. It's a highly attenuative, voracious eater, dry or rehydrated. One less thing to sanitize, and therefore, one less sanitation risk. I think the warnings are overblown, as someone who's brewed for a long time.

That's all good HoosierBrew!  I wasn't trying to aggravate!  Advice from seasoned brewers is very valuable.  I don't mind going through the sanitation process.  Using it dry is way easier though!  I was just looking for the "definitive" answer on pitch rate.  I think that is always what is behind the "use it dry or re-hydrate question" (that shows up often).  With everything in brewing being pretty scientific the specs around dry yeast are pretty loose......

Did you read the link to Sean Terrill's experiments?

For anyone who hasn't seen it yet, this is interesting:

http://seanterrill.com/2011/04/01/dry-yeast-viability/

some good info on exactly the effect of water v wort and dry yeast. if you are going after accurate cell count estimates this is the info you need (well actually for accuracy you need the cytometer etc.)

3536
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dry yeast question
« on: August 26, 2013, 12:27:33 PM »
I usually rehydrate because that's what the manufacturer says to do, and for me it's easier to pour into my carboy. 

I have normally rehydrated dry yeast simply because I didn't have a good way to get the yeast into the carboy through the neck.  To be honest, I didn't try sprinkling down the hole because I imagined it would either stick to the neck or stick to the sanitized funnel. 

Does anyone has a nice trick to get the powedered yeast into the carboy or am I way overthinking this point?

the best trick I have found is to sprinkle the dry yeast on about a cup of warm pre-boiled water and wait till it... oh... nevermind.

If you have been rehydrating for that reason you should go ahead and keep doing it. or get some buckets.

3537
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: dry yeast question
« on: August 26, 2013, 12:24:42 PM »
People say there is no reason to rehydrate, if this is true why does the Safale website have these instructions?

(Rehydration Instructions
Sprinkle the yeast in minimum 10 times its weight of sterile water or wort at 27°C ± 3°C (80°F ± 6°F). Leave to rest 15 to 30 minutes.
Gently stir for 30 minutes, and pitch the resultant cream into the fermentation vessel.
Alternatively, pitch the yeast directly in the fermentation vessel providing the temperature of the wort is above 20°C (68°F). Progressively sprinkle
the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available in order to avoid clumps. Leave for 30 minutes, then mix the
wort using aeration or by wort addition.)

I rehydrate per the instructions and have never had a problem and I dont have to spend the extra for more packs, (32 gallon ferment at a time), I rehydrate (7) packs instead of pitching 11-12 packs dry.

Is this a trick question? The instructions you posted not only suggest that you can use wort instead of water for rehydration but they also suggest that you can rehydrate directly in the fermenter.

also, have you considered trying to get professional pitch packages? it would probably save you money at that scale. Or reusing/propogating.

3538
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Old Schoolhouse Brewery, Winthrop WA
« on: August 26, 2013, 08:31:37 AM »
I've had their beers a number of times at festivals and in bottles.  One of these days I'll get up there.

I believe Evan Ruud (old assistant brewer, son of owner, brother of head brewer) just went down to Durango Brewing where seanterrill used to work.

did he really name his son after an outboard motor?

3539
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First RIS - not quite done
« on: August 23, 2013, 12:50:49 PM »
are you measuring with a hydrometer or refractometer?

3540
beer smith has a place to adjust the utilization %. it mentions that for larger system it should be greater than 100%.

overall though I go +1 on upping the early hops to get your IBUs

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