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Messages - morticaixavier

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3631
Beer Recipes / Re: 60 schilling
« on: August 09, 2013, 07:40:11 AM »
I suppose as a one pot alternative, you could pull off a gallon of wort early in the mash and boil like crazy in the kettle while the mash finishes. This is figuring that with well modified malt most conversion is done pretty quickly, so you'd be safe pulling a gallon after 30 minutes.

^ I like this idea.

I've heard pro brewers talk about getting their kettle blazing hot before starting the runoff to achieve some carmelization (for lack of a better term).

It would take some care to do this without scorching on a direct fire kettle. You could probably get the kettle hot during vorlauf and then cut the heat right before starting runoff. Stir like mad until you cover the bottom, then crank 'er up again. Periodically rotate the kettle on the burner to discourage hot spots.

I have a "sort of" colandria so this wouldn't work on my set up. We are getting a 2 bbl direct fired kettle so I may try it for my commercial set up down the road. Too bad there's not just an extract like a Belgian candi syrup you can just add.

I suppose you could mix up some DME or LME with enough water to prevent it from instantly scorching and then caramelize that. if you used the MO extract might work pretty well

3632
Going Pro / Re: Brewing for food commercially
« on: August 09, 2013, 07:37:30 AM »
Interesting hypothetical question :o  I think you would not have to have a license. Here's why. Let's say you made your beer bread or beer battered fish and chips with commercial beer.   Since technically you are "serving" beer... Would you need an alcohol license and be required to buy your beer through a distributor since you are a "commercial" enterprise? Pretty ridiculous. The other technical point is that the food products wouldn't contain any alcohol. The alcohol would be cooked off...thus you aren't selling alcohol. I agree with your wife the beer is an ingredient....homebrew or commercial.

While logically that would make sense but we are taking about the government. I certainly think a licenses would be needed. If you use commercial beer you are buying it from a company that already has a licenses and meets government regs.  It's not just about the alcohol, it's also about insuring that a food product meets regs.

there are 0 federal food safety regs regarding beer production. so long as they get their tax money they are happy. There may be local food safety regs and they may or may not apply to a brewery but they will for sure apply to a bakery.

3633
Going Pro / Re: Brewing for food commercially
« on: August 08, 2013, 02:32:40 PM »
something to consider is that it's not actually that difficult or expensive to get licensed as a brewer. The barriers to entry into the industry have to do with other economic factors of starting up and making a living from the beer you brew. The federal licensing doesn't cost a dime. The only expenditure associated with it is the brewers bond. State and local fees vary but are often not all that large. Vermont for example is around $150.00. Calfornia, around $200.00.

3634
Equipment and Software / Re: Blichmann burner first impression
« on: August 08, 2013, 01:50:13 PM »
They are the same; or so close I cant tell the difference. My first burner was the bayou sp10. Lasted about 12+ yrs before the cast iron port just crumbled where the gas line ties in. Bought a banjo burner thinking it would fit the stand. It didn't. Bought a Blinchman cause that's what my LHBS had in stock and noticed right away it was the same burner as the new banjo I had at home. So, bought it off the shelf and sold the extra on to a buddy.

Don't know who actually casts the burner, but it appears he's selling to both Bayou and Blinchman.

reading the product description on northern brewer it seems to be that the blichman is all stainless while the kab4 is cast iron. I don't know if this is actually true but either it is and that explains the price difference or it isn't and northern brewer is doing some serious false advertising.

3635
Beer Recipes / Re: 60 schilling
« on: August 08, 2013, 01:42:50 PM »

That's basically what I did. All together was well over a 4 hour boil.

if you wanted to shorten that time you can boil in a vessel that is wide and shallow allowing faster evaporation. that is the part that takes so long and it's not doing anything for you but wasting fuel. once the water concentration gets low enough the flavor development is fairly quick.

So... if I could acquire a hugely-oversized wok and a powerful burner, that might just work. Although it would require a lot of stirring and watching.

at a 5 gallon batch scale when you are only boiling down about 1 gallon you could do it in a big roasting pan on the kitchen stove.

3636
Beer Recipes / Re: 60 schilling
« on: August 08, 2013, 12:58:11 PM »
I'll probably just try it with specialty malts if I brew it again. Don't really care for taking a break in the brew day to boil a side job several hours.

Can you just keep boiling the side car until it's concentrated enough? I mean, you take the first runnings, boil it and boil it and boil it. At the same time, do your last runnings like normal, chill it, let it hang in the fermenter. Then when the syrup is done, dump that into the fermenter? Then pitch yeast if it's a good temperature?

I ask because I'd like to try this without the brew-day break.

That's basically what I did. All together was well over a 4 hour boil.

if you wanted to shorten that time you can boil in a vessel that is wide and shallow allowing faster evaporation. that is the part that takes so long and it's not doing anything for you but wasting fuel. once the water concentration gets low enough the flavor development is fairly quick.

3637
Beer Recipes / Re: 60 schilling
« on: August 08, 2013, 12:23:47 PM »
I'll probably just try it with specialty malts if I brew it again. Don't really care for taking a break in the brew day to boil a side job several hours.

Can you just keep boiling the side car until it's concentrated enough? I mean, you take the first runnings, boil it and boil it and boil it. At the same time, do your last runnings like normal, chill it, let it hang in the fermenter. Then when the syrup is done, dump that into the fermenter? Then pitch yeast if it's a good temperature?

I ask because I'd like to try this without the brew-day break.

don't see why not. you could even pitch yeast and then add the concentrate after.

3638
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: US-05 flocculation
« on: August 08, 2013, 09:38:35 AM »
Jumping back to this thread for a general US-05 question.  As noted above, 05 has always given me great results.  My most recent batch (a low-gravity, high dextrine session rye IPA) did not drop clear after three weeks.  I bottled and will just sit it out I guess, but I'm curious why this might have happened.  Was it this particular recipe?  Was it this pack of yeast?  Did I manage to infect it with a wild yeast or something else? (tasted fine - but that doesn't say much yet).  Final gravity was 1.015, so it had some viscosity - and the rye no doubt added to that as well.  Is that enough to slow settling that much?

could just be starch/protein haze instead of yeast. or perhaps the us-05 is just slowly chewing away at those dextrins. Majorvices posted about having issue with us-05 over carbing in the bottles for him regularly. maybe it's more capable of metabolizing more complex sugars/starches then we generally think?

3639
Beer Recipes / Re: House IPA search, round three
« on: August 08, 2013, 09:36:34 AM »
@ klickitat jim - What is your typical BU/GU on your IPAs? Do you use that ratio to track the movement of the bitterness up or down, or do you just add hops until it tastes right? Mine are right around 1.200-ish (BeerSmith using Tinseth) and while I personally think that's pretty high, I could still see a little more bitterness as being welcome in my IPAs.

If you have a BU:GU ratio that high and your still looking for a little more bitterness you could try bumping your sulfate up way way high. like 250-300ppm

THIS^^^^  Try it the easy empirical way to see if you like it...add 1-2 tsp. of gypsum to the kettle.

Or you can even dose the beer with gypsum in the glass to experiment with levels.

3640
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: First Stir-plate Starter
« on: August 08, 2013, 08:44:15 AM »
How the hell do you enter a photo. I have never been able to do that.
Hmmm I never have a problem. Here's mine today. 2000ml of 1.030 and 100ml of fresh re-used slurry from an APA I kegged this morning. Started at 0900 and high krausen at 1400. I'll chill crash it in the morning and pitch it in tomorrow's IPA.


you need the url of the image as hosted on another site. photobucket or flick or something.

The url you enter should look something like this

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/13/08/08/9e7yjedy.jpg

ending in .jpg (or whatever photo format)

push the little mona lisa button above the smileys and enter that url between the resulting tags

3641
Beer Recipes / Re: House IPA search, round three
« on: August 08, 2013, 07:41:48 AM »
@ klickitat jim - What is your typical BU/GU on your IPAs? Do you use that ratio to track the movement of the bitterness up or down, or do you just add hops until it tastes right? Mine are right around 1.200-ish (BeerSmith using Tinseth) and while I personally think that's pretty high, I could still see a little more bitterness as being welcome in my IPAs.

If you have a BU:GU ratio that high and your still looking for a little more bitterness you could try bumping your sulfate up way way high. like 250-300ppm

3642
Ingredients / Re: Hops Storage
« on: August 07, 2013, 04:15:39 PM »
Just so you don't get too concerned here is a picture of the hop room at anchor steam.



granted they probably go through those bales pretty quick but there is no refrigeration going on there.

3643
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Belle Saison Dry Yeast
« on: August 07, 2013, 12:42:24 PM »
I don't have an exact number, but apparent attenuation is really high with this yeast.  It's like 95%.

or 100%. My batch finished at 1.000, maybe a hair under so 101%?

3644
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 565 higher than expected attenuation?
« on: August 07, 2013, 08:08:32 AM »
Well, we're not quite on track with the thread title here, but that's not out of the ordinary from my board experience in other areas....  What I'd ask is: Did you boil the dickens out of this wort after over-sparging?  I did that to a batch and got a lot of kettle caramelization, leaving less fermentable sweetness.  I'm fairly confident this isn't your case, else you'd have mentioned that the wort was darker and more molasses-like than expected.  But it's better to ask than not.

I've not yet done a WLP565 batch, but I have a vial in the 'fridge.  I have used 566 and 585 with light worts and have obtained pretty stiff attenuations (> 85%).

Another thing: I'm not overly experienced, and I ask questions that I've learned to ask as a result of that experience.  I learned by being confused by it that there is a pretty big temperature correction you may need to do if your sg is measured fairly hot.  Did you do that correction for your near 1.055 OG?  If yo measured it quite hot, then you could have another 5-10 points of OG.  Excuse me if you learned that at your mother's knee, but I didn't.

Michael T.

Boiled off a little under a gallon. Used a refractometer for measuring.

did you take your fg reading with the refractometer as well? if so did you apply a correction for already fermented beer? in the presence of alcohol the refractometer will give an inaccurate reading. However there are tool on line to correct for the error and get the true gravity.

a 1.012 un corrected works out to closer to 1.000 corrected.

I used beersmith's conversion tool for fermenting beer.

ahh well, took a shot

3645
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: WLP 565 higher than expected attenuation?
« on: August 07, 2013, 08:05:44 AM »
Well, we're not quite on track with the thread title here, but that's not out of the ordinary from my board experience in other areas....  What I'd ask is: Did you boil the dickens out of this wort after over-sparging?  I did that to a batch and got a lot of kettle caramelization, leaving less fermentable sweetness.  I'm fairly confident this isn't your case, else you'd have mentioned that the wort was darker and more molasses-like than expected.  But it's better to ask than not.

I've not yet done a WLP565 batch, but I have a vial in the 'fridge.  I have used 566 and 585 with light worts and have obtained pretty stiff attenuations (> 85%).

Another thing: I'm not overly experienced, and I ask questions that I've learned to ask as a result of that experience.  I learned by being confused by it that there is a pretty big temperature correction you may need to do if your sg is measured fairly hot.  Did you do that correction for your near 1.055 OG?  If yo measured it quite hot, then you could have another 5-10 points of OG.  Excuse me if you learned that at your mother's knee, but I didn't.

Michael T.

Boiled off a little under a gallon. Used a refractometer for measuring.

did you take your fg reading with the refractometer as well? if so did you apply a correction for already fermented beer? in the presence of alcohol the refractometer will give an inaccurate reading. However there are tool on line to correct for the error and get the true gravity.

a 1.012 un corrected works out to closer to 1.000 corrected.

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