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Messages - morticaixavier

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3736
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Help with Berliner pellicle.
« on: July 13, 2013, 12:24:15 PM »
My last Berliner kept chugging for months (ma in October, kegged and consumed at a Cinco de Mayo party this past spring....  If you want it quick, then you should do a sour mash, then boil or approach 180f for short time then chill and pitch the yeast at ambient temps;  or skip the Brett and go with the straight lacto pitch followed by the yeast a few days in.  At least that is what I read from experienced sour guys around here.

Hmm, this is an interesting thought.  Straight lacto pitch for a few days then yeast.  There is some white labs berliner yeast I saw at the lhbs that I may pick up

you can do that to. pitch lacto only and hold the temp around 100*f for a few days till you get your sourness then heat to 180 or above and chill and pitch.

3737
What a out boiling them down, pureeing, freezing, then adding? Even leas chance of infection?

Sure... If you feel that froggy... Take the leap!

I'm just trying to mitigate any possible risks!

wait, we are talking about a sour beer here right? it's going to be infected right? so what's the worry. with the low pH and moderate alcohol content of the mostly finished beer it's unlikely that anything really unpleasent is going to happen. Cooked fruit is not going to taste anything like raw fruit you can steam them or soak them in sanitizer to kill stuff on the outside if you want. still no guarantees but that is sour brewing with fruit.

3738
fruit sour?

do a simply golden ale with some simple sugar and pitch lots of bugs and bottle dregs at it and then add the fruit as well. whole hog

So pitch the fruits whole when I pitch the yeast?

I would wait till fermentation slows way way down. You could even transfer to a secondary if you wanted to free up a primary fermenter (I say this because I have glass carboys that I never use and I only have 6 or so buckets) I might freeze them first and maybe chop them a  bit. There is some question about adding pits to the beer but I am skeptical about the risks

3739
fruit sour?

do a simply golden ale with some simple sugar and pitch lots of bugs and bottle dregs at it and then add the fruit as well. whole hog

3740
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Refractometer Sale
« on: July 12, 2013, 01:22:07 PM »
Mine showed up today.  Only a soft case, but still quite happy with the purchase
The fact that that detail is inconsistent, keeps me away from the "deal".

I bet if you read the fine print is says that another product will be substituted if supply requires. I got the hardcase and cloth and all just like in the picture.

3741
Ingredients / Re: When to add sugar for Biere de Garde
« on: July 12, 2013, 01:21:03 PM »
I certainly didn't mean to imply that he had to, just doesn't seem like that much more work to me. given that there are situations where it WILL potentially make a difference why not get in the habit?

3742
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Water
« on: July 12, 2013, 01:19:54 PM »
Any reason to adjust my water for an extract brew?  Normally an all-grain brewer.  My water tastes fine but I do have high bicarbonates-275 ppm per Ward Labs.

I'm learning this whole forum, and I'm not sure if I posted in the right place, but my question somewhat pertains to water, but the volume amount of the boil.

I'm brewing an American IPA, extract. In the past, I've boiled either 2 or 3 gallons, added all my grains, syrup, and hops to that volume amount (2 or 3 gallons). I'm thinking this time around of boiling all 5 gallons, and adding my respective ingredients to 5 gallons, rather than the 2 or 3.

Will this affect my flavor? I've noticed a lot of extract recipes calls to boil 2, 3, or even less water, rather than 5. Thanks.

always feel free to start a new post if you have a question. It will be more likely to get seen and fully answered but I will try.

The main reason to boil 2 or 3 gallons for extract is that you don't really NEED to boil it all so why waste energy? however there are some benefits to boiling the full volume. You should have no problem with straight extract and specialty grains so long as you pay attention to the pH OR pull the grains before the water temp exceeds 170*f. Hop utilization, the amount of bitterness you get from a given amount of hops, will be different depending on the gravity of the wort you are boiling them in. The level of darkening due to maillard reactions is also dependent on the amount of sugar and protein in the wort so a more concentrated boil will darken more.

3743
Ingredients / Re: When to add sugar for Biere de Garde
« on: July 12, 2013, 07:32:34 AM »
I think you should add the sugar to the fermenter after the first few days. It is supposed to be healthier for the yeast as it keeps the osmotic pressure on the fermenting beer down and I find that it helps with keeping the temp rise down on a big or a really digestible beer.
 

3744
Beer Recipes / Re: The Gargoyle
« on: July 11, 2013, 01:05:01 PM »
Shouldn't a beer with that name be dark? That's what I'm thinkin'...

Gargoyles are protectors from evil spirits... So, gargoyles scare off darkness. They are ugly but good.

Actually I didn't look that deep into when naming it. We have gargoyles around our koi pond, so as I sat on the porch putting together the recipe, I looked at one of the gargoyles and thought that should be the name. But I see your point, but it's my beer so your point doesn't matter  ;) :P

who says darkness is inherently associated with evil spirits?  ;D

3745
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 11, 2013, 09:26:47 AM »
[...]
if the yeast were all gone you wouldn't get any carbonation. yes it looks like totally normal yeast sedimentation from bottle conditioning. What yeast did you use? I suspect it was a fairly clumpy one like 1968 or similar.

568 Saison blend from white labs

hmm not known for it flocculence but I still stick with yeast.

3746
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Soo..
« on: July 11, 2013, 08:37:17 AM »
I do all of my starter wort in quart canning jars. 2.5 oz per jar. 15 min at 15 psi. I do about 14 quarts at a time. Always room temp when I need it.

even better, next time you are making beer calculate for an extra 2 gallons of wort. run off into a separate container and dilute to 1.030ish and pressure can. I find I can often just run the extra water through my grain after I get my boil volume and get what I need. free, sterile, room temp starter wort!

3747
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Flake looking material in bottles?
« on: July 11, 2013, 08:33:19 AM »
Pics. But, try a commercial bottle conditiond like Sierra Nevada, there's floaties. I wouldn't sweat it

Oh, not sweating it, just trying to figure out why it's there because there was little to no yeast in suspension when I bottled, so I'm curious what caused these flakes to form in 3 days

I wouldn't worry either.  I used to have hop floaties in my beer.  Then I started racking into the fermenting bucket instead of pouring the whole thing and that took care of most of it. 

Now I whirlpool the wort at the end of the boil to make a pile of trub in the center of the kettle and rack into the carboy from the edge of the kettle.  No more trub in the finished product other than yeast. 

I'd expect plenty of yeast to still be in suspension though.  What is your method of filtration?

Maybe filter isn't correct. I do the same thing whirlpool wise, then rack from the edge.  I rack into secondary and finally rack into the bottling bucket, so 3 total racks. I had assumed that most of the yeast was gone. When I saw all this I was wow, where did that come from?

So bottom line is the yeast in suspension, when hit with the priming sugar, flocs out again?

if the yeast were all gone you wouldn't get any carbonation. yes it looks like totally normal yeast sedimentation from bottle conditioning. What yeast did you use? I suspect it was a fairly clumpy one like 1968 or similar.

3748
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Refractometer Sale
« on: July 11, 2013, 07:48:53 AM »
Well, I just got mine in today and everything looks as advertised. Nice case, and the refractometer seems very sturdy. I'm looking forward to testing it out tomorrow.

My only complaint is that the SG scale is way too small for my crappy eyes to read.
Me to. all looks well.

+1 on the sg scale being too small to read.

3749
Equipment and Software / Re: What type fittings are these?
« on: July 10, 2013, 01:41:40 PM »
For the tubing you could use polycarbonate or borosilicate glass (McMaster-Carr) and use a couple of silicone O-rings in place of the metal compression ring.
That's how my sight glass is constructed. I bought it from www.bargainfittings.com

Thanks. If you get around to it, can you post a pic?

You mean like this?

3750
Ingredients / Re: Candi sugar
« on: July 10, 2013, 12:49:37 PM »
I did not really want to add it to the boil, but rather let the yeast get
to high Krausen (no need for a giant starter)on a lower gravity
then supplement the sugar, once maybe twice as the fermentation progresses.

I guess recalling some fermentations I watched in a carboy, the turbulence
was enough to keep all the ingredients in flux.  I think I am just going to
carefully maintain sanitation, and add the syrup to the bucket.  The contents
of the food grade syrup was probably packaged Hot and must be sanitary else
you would have moldy syrup upon opening of the commerical packaging.

this is what I have been doing lately to good effect. the yeast get a solid go at it in a nice 1.038 wort and then I hit it with a lb of oney 3 days in.

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