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Messages - morticaixavier

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3781
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Who's going to NHC?
« on: June 23, 2013, 11:57:07 AM »
Well, crap....sometimes life interferes with beer.  My mom passed away this morning so I'll be spending the week in the beer wasteland of Phoenix.  Wish I could be there with you all, but that's the way things go.

wow sorry to hear that Denny. Take care. I'll keep you in my thoughts. I'll even drink a beer for you in philly

3782
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Who's going to NHC?
« on: June 23, 2013, 09:57:26 AM »
We do have a room! It's one of the ballrooms even, so break out some beers and make sure we have everything we need to have some fun. I'm trying to secure some signage to make it more apparent.

Hey folks. any idea when we are going to try to make this meetup happen? I'm starting my final planning and my wife would like to know when I will be MIA.

3783
Beer Recipes / Re: Bottling for my Grand Cru
« on: June 21, 2013, 01:26:10 PM »
I have used Champagne yeast at bottling for some of the bigger Belgian beers (over 1.080 OG) that have bulk aged in the carboy for a while with good success.

sure as a bottling strain for very strong beers it can be great. It'll eat through the priming sugar quick and won't eat anything else. But I am pretty sure the OP was intending to use the Champagne yeast as primary.

3784
Classifieds / Re: 15 Gal (60L) SS Conical Fermenter
« on: June 21, 2013, 12:27:57 PM »
sweet, wish I had 500$

3785
Homebrew Competitions / Re: Flanders Red Carbonation Level
« on: June 20, 2013, 01:18:45 PM »
Judging is subjective.  I have had beers that one judge said was too hoppy, the other not hoppy enough.   On the Flanders red carbonation note, many of the bottled commercial examples I've had were aggressively carbonated.  On tap , they were less so.  The BJCP guidelines say low to medium carbonation, but I would have to disagree.

I see what you mean. with a style like this where the carbonation could well increase with time in the bottle it is hard to put a limit on it.

3786
Ingredients / Re: Summer order
« on: June 20, 2013, 09:46:29 AM »
You must use Munich as a base in something huh?

I use at least a few pounds of munich in almost every recipe and have at least two recipes I like that are 100% or nearly 100% munich.

3787
Ingredients / Re: Summer order
« on: June 20, 2013, 08:28:03 AM »
only 10# of munich? man that wouldn't last me through two brew days much less the summer. ;D The three malts I buy by the sack are; pale, pils, and munich. Love that stuff.

Nice list. you've got a good summer ahead of you

3788
Beer Recipes / Re: Bottling for my Grand Cru
« on: June 20, 2013, 08:25:36 AM »
Ah, for some reason that completely slipped my mind. If I used a sauvingnon blanc or pinot grigio juice, for example instead of the clover honey. Then the yeast should have something to munch on? I am glad I haven't started the brew yet. It was a dream I had one night, then I purchased everything the next day. I didn't even think about it, I believe I have learned from these impulses.

What malt bill would you go with for a typical grand cru? Like I said, it was all impulse, and I am trying to teach myself via reading but also through just trying stuff out to see what I come up with. I am glad I have people like you to keep me on the right path.

it's not the honey that the Champaign yeast might have a problem with, it's the malt sugars coming from your grain. Wine yeasts in general are adapted to eating very simple sugars like those found in fruit, the honey, and your priming sugar. Beer yeasts tend to be somewhat better adapted to eating the more complex malt sugars. If you have decided to use the Champaign yeast to get a drier finished product I think you are better off using a nice flavourful Belgian yeast and mashing at a lower temp and removing the carapils. Instead of carapils for body and mouthfeel you can add some rolled or malted oats and or some wheat.


3789
All Grain Brewing / Re: Rather than doing a decoction...
« on: June 19, 2013, 08:48:05 AM »
guess I need a bigger pressure cooker  ::)

mine is much smaller than that.

Mine is the Presto 23-quart and it's plenty big enough...

http://www.amazon.com/Presto-01781-23-Quart-Pressure-Canner/dp/B0000BYCFU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1371655986&sr=8-2&keywords=presto+pressure+cooker

Yeah, the one I have right now is only a 6qt or maybe 8. I imagine though that a big pressure cooker should be an easy purchase to justify. Especially as the garden starts to come in.

3790
All Grain Brewing / Re: need help converting a recipe to no- sparge
« on: June 19, 2013, 08:29:14 AM »
you will likely have to change the efficiency settings. do you mean no sparge or first runnings? these mean two different things to me at least.

no sparge means that you don't run off, re-fill and run off again. essentially you don't rinse the grain at all. When I do no sparge I include a 'mashout' step that brings my water/grist ratio up really high, like 6-7 liters per kilo (about 3.5 qt/lb) then runoff. I get around 67% brewhouse eff doing this.

First runnings only means to me that you are building a partigyle recipe and not doing a second runnings beer. In that case you mash with your normal water:grist ratio and runoff whatever is there. If I calculate the brewhouse efficiency on the first runnings beer ONLY on a partigyle brew I get ~52-55%.

I don't really see the difference here.  The only reason most partigyle beers use a "normal" water to grist ratio is that the first runnings beer is usually something big like a barleywine.  If you're doing a first runnings beer for something with lower OG, your water to grist ratio is going to be higher but you'll still need about the same amount of total liquor to hit your desired volume (adjusting for absorption differences).  You don't want to go too thin, so the mashout step is a good idea for anything above 2.5 qt/lb or so.

true, it depends on the gravity of the recipe. that is the main difference. However if you are calculating your efficiency that is what it primarily depends on in my experience.

When I am doing no-sparge it is for a small to medium beer. I'm not leaving a lot of sugar behind at that point. If I do no-sparge on a big beer though I am leaving enough sugar behind to make another whole batch of beer. so perhaps a difference in degree rather than kind but I still see a pretty significant difference.

So lets say this...

If at a high but not too high water:grist ratio you can reach your preboil volume, accounting for all boil off and grain absorption that your overall efficiency will likely be lower than if you can/have too add additional 'mash out' water to meet your volume needs.

3791
All Grain Brewing / Re: need help converting a recipe to no- sparge
« on: June 19, 2013, 07:58:55 AM »
you will likely have to change the efficiency settings. do you mean no sparge or first runnings? these mean two different things to me at least.

no sparge means that you don't run off, re-fill and run off again. essentially you don't rinse the grain at all. When I do no sparge I include a 'mashout' step that brings my water/grist ratio up really high, like 6-7 liters per kilo (about 3.5 qt/lb) then runoff. I get around 67% brewhouse eff doing this.

First runnings only means to me that you are building a partigyle recipe and not doing a second runnings beer. In that case you mash with your normal water:grist ratio and runoff whatever is there. If I calculate the brewhouse efficiency on the first runnings beer ONLY on a partigyle brew I get ~52-55%.

3792
All Grain Brewing / Re: Rather than doing a decoction...
« on: June 19, 2013, 07:49:16 AM »
guess I need a bigger pressure cooker  ::)

mine is much smaller than that.

3793
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: What should I offer this guy?
« on: June 18, 2013, 10:01:39 PM »
I'd start with the scrap value of stainless steel and tell the guy that you will not charge him for hauling them away.

My guess is this guy does not know the value of what he has, and is hoping for the best.  He just wants to make some money off of something that's collecting dust and taking up space.

Hell, he may take $100 for the pair and think he got over on you.

If you get them for scrap price, and they turn out to be useless, you will still be able to recoup your investment.

He asked you to make an offer.  Don't be in a hurry to give money away unnecessarily.

+1, this. he's not going to run away no matter how low you go. If he had that many buyers he would have named a price to beat.

3794
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Water
« on: June 18, 2013, 03:52:22 PM »
If the beer tastes good then don't worry about it. If it seems too minerally try brewing a batch with distilled water.

3795
All Grain Brewing / Re: Rather than doing a decoction...
« on: June 18, 2013, 09:27:40 AM »
When you do a decoction, you are producing melanoidins at boiling temps, as the decoction is not boiled long enough or hard enough to concentrate. I don't boil the decoctions too hard, as I don't want scorching to happen.

Pressure cooker decoction, baby :)  No constant stirring, no scorching

tell me more

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