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Messages - morticaixavier

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4006
Ingredients / Re: Tart cherry juice concentrate
« on: December 04, 2012, 02:18:15 PM »
Just had my cherry juice for the day. The bottle of concentrate had the company, which is from Michigan, and below that in the fine print "product of Turkey". They had to find the tart cherries somewhere. Now I know one of the wheres.

yeesh - I'll check the bottle I have left over. I want to make sure my cherries are AT LEAST from this country, hopefully from the midwest. Thanks for the heads up!

good luck! the midwest was hit hard by the weather this year and the cherry crop was very nearly wiped out. maybe find some from the pacific northwest though.

4007
The Pub / Re: Not a good time to be a French Brewer 8^(
« on: December 04, 2012, 02:16:52 PM »
good analysis phil.

4008
The Pub / Re: Absente
« on: December 04, 2012, 01:08:05 PM »
I have watched people who I had previously seen handle vast amounts of alcahol reasonably well do some of the stupidest things you can imagine while drinking homemade absinthe.

4009
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Keg System pressure
« on: December 04, 2012, 01:01:04 PM »
wouldn't thinner line create more restriction and therefore need less length? I use ~4 foot 3/16 ID and it works fine 8-12 PSI (a little foamy at 12)
Yes, but 1/4" is wider than 3/16".

I was responding to Denny's comment RE: too short and too thin.
I just misinterpreted it

I figured as much.  :D

4010
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Keg System pressure
« on: December 04, 2012, 11:46:17 AM »
wouldn't thinner line create more restriction and therefore need less length? I use ~4 foot 3/16 ID and it works fine 8-12 PSI (a little foamy at 12)
Yes, but 1/4" is wider than 3/16".

I was responding to Denny's comment RE: too short and too thin.

4011
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Well...I drank my first homebrew
« on: December 04, 2012, 11:45:36 AM »
Well,they say you learn something new everyday....so I'm calling it a day and going home.  No idea about the general feeling of secondary racking.  Really interesting. 

So my general question is this.  If I was going to do an IPA with some dry hopping with pellets.  Would it be smart to rack into a secondary and then dry hop or dry hop in the primary after about 2 weeks?  Maybe leaving them in for about a week?

Just curious when it would be good to rack to a secondary if the general consensus is bigger beers (i.e. barley wines, Scottish ales, etc.)

Thanks again for the great feedback.

If I was doing an IPA and I did not want to re-use the yeast, I would dry hop in primary after the bulk of fermentation is complete. I would have said for about 1 week but after reading this thread
http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=14077.0 I might alter that advice. But I haven't finished reading the article so maybe not yet.

4012
okay, take 10$ and buy 10 .5 litre bottles of water. carefully remove the label without scratching the plastic surface. Place in freezer. after your IC gets you down to 85 sanitize some of the frozen bottles and put them in the wort. move them around a bit.

now figure out what you are going to buy with your other 90 bucks!

4013
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Keg System pressure
« on: December 04, 2012, 11:33:02 AM »
rock and roll carbing is great. I do it all the time. but do it at serving pressure. yes 30PSI will get you there faster but it will also get you WAY over your target faster. set at 10, rock for 10 minutes or until it stops refilling. I like to hold my keg by the top handle and the bottom foot with the gas post down gas attached (never had suck back) and shift back and forth on my feet until the gas entry slows way down. It's usually okay after that but it's gunky and cloudy till the next day and the carb is better once it settles anyway.
So do you only rock it for ten minutes, then set it back in the fridge? This sounds like my problem. I have been carbing at 30psi for upwards of 30-40 minutes, til their is no-more gas going in whatsoever.

yeah you are way overcarbed. think about denny's comment above as well but if you are shaking at 30PSI until no more gas goes in it's the equivelant of carbing at 30 PSI. I think the guideline for carbing at higher pressure is to fill the keg, take the gas off and shake, rest and repeat once or twice more. But I like carbing at serving pressure better.

The dispense tubing sounds too short and too thin to get a good balance.

wouldn't thinner line create more restriction and therefore need less length? I use ~4 foot 3/16 ID and it works fine 8-12 PSI (a little foamy at 12)

4014
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Keg System pressure
« on: December 04, 2012, 11:19:15 AM »
Thanks Tom

The beer pours at 40°F, the keg line is 4 ft of 1/4"id hose, in the fridge entirely.

I force carb, and haven't ever looked at volumes of CO2 very accurately. I just rock the keg at 30 psi til it stops chirping (I chill the keg first) and then let it sit. I vent the excess pressure and then *try* to serve at 10 psi.

I'll check out that link right now and see what i can figure out.

As to the overcarbonation, I have had the gas low enough that it could essentially be off. I've had to deliver at pressures around 1 in order to not just blast beer/foam all over the place. Which now that I say it, makes me think that overcarbonation could be a very real issue.

Perhaps my problem is in carbonation, and not in the keg set-up.

rock and roll carbing is great. I do it all the time. but do it at serving pressure. yes 30PSI will get you there faster but it will also get you WAY over your target faster. set at 10, rock for 10 minutes or until it stops refilling. I like to hold my keg by the top handle and the bottom foot with the gas post down gas attached (never had suck back) and shift back and forth on my feet until the gas entry slows way down. It's usually okay after that but it's gunky and cloudy till the next day and the carb is better once it settles anyway.

4015
Ingredients / Re: Dry Hopping research - Interesting
« on: December 04, 2012, 10:51:56 AM »
I have for sure noticed that if I drop a bag of hops in the keg and shake to carb it immediatly has some hop aroma. and I don't notice a significant increase the next day so that actually makes sense to me. by rocking the keg with the hops in there I am extracting most of what will be extracted in just a few minutes/hours. nice.

4016
Classifieds / Re: 5 Gallon Whiskey Soaked Barrels now available!
« on: December 04, 2012, 09:32:14 AM »
dang, quite the mark up from the $50 balcones charges huh?

I guess if you only need one though... does that include shipping?

4017
Ingredients / Re: Dry Hopping research - Interesting
« on: December 04, 2012, 09:27:52 AM »
Insight in how to get rid of that unpleasant onion/foot aroma with certain hops!

Quote
[...]it had been shown that adding granular copper dramatically reduced the presence of currant-like and onion aromas in beer[...]

4018
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: Well...I drank my first homebrew
« on: December 04, 2012, 08:44:08 AM »
1.010 is not to low for a lightish ale.

Ahh, yup, my brain put another Zero in there.

Does anyone have any idea how much oxidation can play a role based on headspace? I know I want to limit headspace in a secondary, but If it's not mixing, how much headspace is too much?

I.d skip secondary all together unless you have a good reason to do it (adding fruit, possibly dry hopping if you want to use the yeast again, REALLY long bulk aging like months and months at room temp) The smaller the beer the less ideal a secondary is really. A nice light ale is going to be completely ruined by a little oxidation while a big barley wine can actually improve with a little oxidation. That being said I think it's about surface area. so fill your carboy up to the neck and there is less beer/air contact so less oxidation.

4019
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: First Batch
« on: December 04, 2012, 08:40:56 AM »
Perfect, this seems to be simple and efficient.

Euge brings up a point I've often thought about but never done anything about. When trying to chill my wort, I usually stir, but in the process, it feels like I am subjecting myself to HSA and increasing the haze of my beer down the road. Does everyone stir their wort post-boil? Does no-one stir their wort post-boil? Does the cold break just fall out of solution once I get it in the fermenter?

I have not had a problem with HSA. I stir every time. It's no different than using an IC with whirlpool return. don't spash too much but I really don't think it's an issue. I get brilliantly clear beers using only irish moss and time.

After I get it down as low as I am going to with the IC I pull the chiller and gt the wort moving as a mass then let it settle and much of the cold break drops to the bottom of the kettle where I can leave it behind by slowly opening the valve into the fermenter.

4020
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Kegging without a fridge
« on: December 03, 2012, 11:12:32 PM »
It is wintertime. In most parts of the country you can serve most beer at ambient temp nicely. When I first started kegging it was good enough to keep the kegs in the back room away from any heat and it was not overly warm or foamy. It was generally in the 50s or 60s in my backroom.

Hehe, you should try that in Florida! I'm still wearing shorts.

gotcha. well you could also try a swamp cooler but it's probably pretty humid down there too.

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