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Messages - morticaixavier

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4351
All Grain Brewing / Re: Base malt recommendation for Belgian brews
« on: January 04, 2013, 12:39:59 PM »
It depends on what kind of Belgian beers you're brewing. Pilsner is sort of the default base malt for Belgian beers but there's actually quite a few Belgian beers using pale malt as a base because it gets you a less dry, grainy taste. If you are going to brew a lot of tripels, Belgian blondes and BGSA then yes, pilsner is the appropriate choice. Anything else could easily be brewed with pale malt, even saisons. Just depends on what flavor profile and mouthfeel you want in the beer.

I feel like pils malt gives me a sweeter finished impression than pale or pale ale malts.

4352
Equipment and Software / Re: best bottling equipment
« on: January 04, 2013, 12:34:37 PM »
I just tried a new process for bottling beers for bottle conditioning.

All my bottling buckets (the ones with spigots) are a little funky at this point, particularly in the spigot itself as it's nearly impossible to clean those well so this week I did something different. I added my priming sugar (and some new yeast as this beer was a big beast) to a clean sanitized and purged keg, racked the beer into the keg and sealed it up. I could then safely shake the keg a bit to make sure I had good distribution of sugar and yeast. Then I just forced the green beer out with a few psi of co2 into bottles and capped as normal.

It worked really well, better than a bottling bucket for sure.


I like this idea, I may try this on my next hefe even though I've got a bottling bucket I've only used once. Seems like a good way to avoid oxidation. You can rack into a co2 filled vessel and fill bottles with co2 pressure instead of o2.

yeah, it seemed to go quicker to but it's been a goodly while since I bottled a full 5 gallons the old way so who's to say.

4353
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: 2013 Brew Year's Resolutions/Goals
« on: January 04, 2013, 11:31:51 AM »
Enter NHC
Attend NHC (I have all sorts of reminders on my calendar so I hope to get a chance at both of these before they fill up)
Brew some sour beers
Malt my own barley (was going to grow it too but didn't get it planted this year so that will have to wait till next winter)
experiment with gluten free grains.
start building a 1 bbl system

4354
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Sort of a pole
« on: January 04, 2013, 08:53:59 AM »
till it's done  ;D

It's really a hard question. I have had beer of that gravity in the keg after two weeks and have left it for 4.

Keep checking the gravity, and the taste. even after the gravity has stabalized I notice significant improvement in flavour with a little extra time on the yeast.

I will often cold crash a finished beer for a week or two on the yeast also. don't know if that matters or if it would be fine if I kegged it and cold crashed but I like what it does and the kegged beer gets consumed so the second half of the keg is always better than the first half.

4355
Equipment and Software / Re: best bottling equipment
« on: January 04, 2013, 08:47:54 AM »
I just tried a new process for bottling beers for bottle conditioning.

All my bottling buckets (the ones with spigots) are a little funky at this point, particularly in the spigot itself as it's nearly impossible to clean those well so this week I did something different. I added my priming sugar (and some new yeast as this beer was a big beast) to a clean sanitized and purged keg, racked the beer into the keg and sealed it up. I could then safely shake the keg a bit to make sure I had good distribution of sugar and yeast. Then I just forced the green beer out with a few psi of co2 into bottles and capped as normal.

It worked really well, better than a bottling bucket for sure.

In terms of sanitizing bottles i use the oven. I always rinse bottles as soon as they are empty and delabel as needed. I rinse well with hot water and put them in the oven the night before I am bottling. bake at 350 for 20 minutes or so and then shut the oven off and let them cool over night.

If I am bottling carbonated beer I am not usually doing a whole batch or for a long storage period so I just santize in a bucket and call it good enough.

4356
Also look at what you are eating, drinking, smoking, smelling while/immediatly before tasteing.

I quit smoking tobacco a couple years ago and I was astonished at the increase in my ability to taste and smell subtle flavours. get some plain soda crackers or simple baguette to nibble between tastes to clear your pallete before tasting again.

let the beer warm a bit before tasting as this will boost flavour and aroma significantly.

4357
I have heard recently, I think from Denny, that the cloudiness = higher pH is not really all that accurate. If you have the ability to test pH that is your best bet for figuring out if the star san is still good.

I mix mine with tap water so it clouds over almost immediatly but still seems to work (fingers crossed, no infections yet)

4358
Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Unibroue la Terrible
« on: January 03, 2013, 08:57:46 AM »
Not to diss Unibroue or anything, but Dieu du Ciel is IMO the best Canadian brewery.

+1 phil. I find the unibroue beers to all have a house flavour that doesn't work for me. But that could be purely personal taste.

4359
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Christmas Presents
« on: December 28, 2012, 12:28:55 AM »
I to got a 50$ gift cert to the LHBS and a good friend and brewing mentee (mentee? is that a word? I got him hooked on brewing) Made me a beutiful new mash paddle out of hard rock maple.

plus a silly tee-shirt that says 'beer whisperer'

4360
Beer Recipes / Re: What is your best session beer recipe?
« on: December 28, 2012, 12:24:06 AM »
I like enough munich to get me to 1.036, enough boil hops to get me to 30-40 IBU and lots of flame out and dry hops.

If no munich around, pale ale and an lb of medium (c45ish) crystal will do.

4361
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Brett Non Fermentation
« on: December 23, 2012, 09:13:49 PM »
Can you give us recipe and process details? How much brett did you pitch? as I understand it if you pitch lots of brett it will work fairly quickly and cleanly much like sach. Does the sample taste sweet? you say it tastes 'clean' but that doesn't tell us very much.

Recipe,
Process,
OG,
Pitching rate.

4362
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: ridonkulous AA%
« on: December 23, 2012, 07:11:51 PM »
How is the mouthfeel? Is it thin? I've heard that WLP037 can be a super attenuator, but that just doesn't sound right. You said you calculated an OG ~1.086 - was that actually measured? Maybe you got a lower mash efficiency than you originally thought?


It's not carbed up yet or anything but the mouthfeel is fine. Not chewy at all but still sweeter than a double IPA ought to be, more or less just right for a barley wine in my opinion.

When we refer to unfermentable gravity points... generally that's for saccharomyces. There are other types of yeast, bacteria or enzymes etc. that can break those sugars down or ferment them out. Chances are you got some kind of contamination and consider yourself lucky you don't taste any funk.

A friend of mine had a similar experience with beers he's bottled with his beer gun. These beers were fully fermented out and kegged but months after having bottled them, they would volcano when we opened them up. But no strange attributes.

I don't think it's infected. I mean it's always possible. but there are no other signs at all, it's quite clear considering there is a giant yeast cake floating above it. but at this point I am not that worried about that. I'll get it in bottles and crack one open in a couple weeks to see what's going on.

4363
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: ridonkulous AA%
« on: December 21, 2012, 02:00:59 PM »
Shouldn't syrup be more or less all fermentable sugars? If that's the case then adding 14 points to the OG would also knock about 6 points off the FG. So you're essentially looking at a 1.086 wort fermenting down to 1.010-1.012 on its own, which doesn't seem unusual for a recipe with no crystal malts and a long, low mash rest.

well put. looking at it like that it makes good sense. I was suprised at the amount of body remaining as well not thin at all even with out carbonation. woo hoo. I made a 13% beer!

I wonder if I should add some champagne yeast for bottling. the stuff that's in there must be pretty pooped by now.

4364
I've been lagering my Baltic Porter for about 2.5 months so far.  I plan to bottle my 5 gal. batch in 12 oz. bottles in a day or two.  How much sugar do I use?  I know there are calculators on the web for calculating the amount of sugar to use depending on how high the fermentation temperature got, but do these also work for beers that have been lagered?

Should I let the beer warm to room temperature for a day or two before bottling, or just bottle it cold?

Scott

The beer temp parameter on those bottling calculators are trying to determine how much residual disolved CO2 is still present in the beer from the initial fermentation. As the yeast metabolize the sugars they produce co2 which disolves in the fermenting beer to an extent determined by the temperature of the beer (colder = more CO2 in solution, warmer = less) and the pressure the beer is under in the fermenter (just a tiny bit above ambient for most homebrewers). However once CO2 escapes solution it won't go back in unless pressure is increased. The yeast continue to produce more CO2 as the work so CO2 lost will to some extent be replaced. However once they have mostly gone dormant and ceased metabolizing sugars into CO2 and alchahol the amount of disolved CO2 will only decrease with decrease in temperature and/or pressure as no new CO2 is being produced. so what you want to determine is the highest temp the beer reached after the yeast were done producing CO2.

Whew... that was long winded. so If you crashed or stepped the temp down after the beer had acheived FG you would want to use the temp BEFORE you lowered it (around 40-50 I would guess).

And as Weithman5 says, you will need to warm the beer up to room temp or so to get the yeast back to work on the priming sugar.

4365
Ingredients / Re: Water Check - not Happy with "Pale Ale" profile
« on: December 21, 2012, 11:15:35 AM »
I'll give a +1 on skipping the epsom. never used it and never had a problem with the yeast not floccing

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