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Messages - morticaixavier

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4396
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Dishwasher Sanitize vs. Jet Bottle Washer
« on: December 13, 2012, 01:16:19 PM »
I would still recommend "cleaning" the bottles.  I don't think a quick rinse cuts it.

You can clean the bottles with either dish soap and a bottle brush (you can hook it up to your drill for a power wash) or a 30 minute soak in hot PBW. 

I prefer the stainless jet washer to the brass one.  It's more gentle on your plumbing.

P.S.  no reason to rinse iodophor
Unless they have been sitting around unrinsed I don't get too chuffed with cleaning the bottles. I rinse well with hot water right after emptying them and then when it's time to bottle I either dunk/spray them in/with idophor/starsan if I am only bottling a couple off the keg, or put them all in the oven at 350 for 20 minutes the night before I am going to bottle. The dishwasher works too, instead of the oven if you can be confident of the temp inside.

However when my stock of reusable bottles with labels still on gets a bit high I take an evening and soak them all in hot PBW solution mainly because it makes it easier to remove the labels.

4397
Ingredients / Re: calciuim chloride post ferment
« on: December 13, 2012, 01:06:48 PM »
I haven't thought of this before, but maybe there is some merit.  Assuming that the spices added some excess tannins to the beer, it could be possible to chelate those tannins with a dose of calcium ions.  And since you wouldn't want to enhance the drying perception of the beer, sulfate is out.  So calcium chloride could be a valid option to help with this remediation. 

Do explore this effect some more.  It could work.  Your palate is as good as anyone's.  Although, I would suggest that you gather some friends and explore the effect more scientifically by performing blind triangle testing to assess the effect. 

Thanks for sharing!

Thanks Martin,

I will try to put something together.

4398
Ingredients / calciuim chloride post ferment
« on: December 13, 2012, 11:47:16 AM »
Hey All,

My christmas beer is an oatmeal raisin stout with spices this year. It's all done and in the keg and it's pretty nice except for two things;

There is a bit too much astringency, I suspect because I soaked cinnamon sticks in vodka for a month and added the vodka to the keg. I suspect this because the astringency is kind of woody, like that you might find in a wood aged beer. Although I also think the skins of the raisins might have added some tannins, they were in the beer for a couple, three weeks.

There is a touch too much tartness, I suspect from the raisins as it's kind of raisiny/grapy/fruity tartness, I don't THINK it's infected but it could be that as well I supose.

So last night I decided to do an experiment, I took a couple tiny grains of calcium chloride and dropped them right in my glass with a couple oz of beer and swirled it around and I think it helped. I think by accentuating the malt a bit more it draws attention away from the flaws a bit while still allowing those flavours that I want to be showcased. I LIKE the tart raisin and the slightly woody cinnamon, just not quite so much.

Finally to the actual question. As a ball park how much Calcium Chloride should I be thinking about adding? I can't imagine I would want more than say 5-10 grams. Is there a convienient way to use bru'n water to figure out some PPM values for the chloride based on post ferment additions? I suspect I could simply by plugging in the volume of beer in the keg and adding the salt until the ppm is where i want it.

I see recommendations for a roughly 2:1 sulfate:chloride ratio for hoppy beer, would I want to reverse this for malty beers? 1:2 sufate:chloride?

4399
[...] 

if this is straight up true...

Quote
The large brewers employ 25,000 people in their stateside brewing facilities and, undoubtedly, in cities like Milwaukee, Denver and St. Louis, these jobs are important to the local economies. But across the entire U.S., small and independent craft brewers employ more than 103,500 Americans in local, Main Street jobs.

...then it's even more reason to support your local brewery, something I think a lot of us on these beer forums already do anyway.  I suspect the language used by the author was a bit "emotive," but the sentiment would still hold provided the statistic is valid.

I was just going to post that quote.

Just ruff back of apkin math, if the 75% of the beer market in america that is controlled by the big guys were in the hands of small indie brewers that would mean around 725,000 new jobs! that's huge!

4400
All Things Food / Re: Kitchen Knives
« on: December 13, 2012, 09:00:30 AM »
On the bread knife though I would say save some money and get a cheap stamped blade. They are a pain to sharpen anyway and with the serations you dont' really need to for a very long time. I have a $15 henckly stamped blade bread knife that works just fine

Did you look at that sammich knife?  That's more than just a bread knife.

It reminds me of the knife the old guy used to make sammiches at the Berghoff stand-up bar back when they were open.  Awesome lunch line they had there, and the sandwhich guy really knew how to use his knife.  He was like an artist carving the meat, slicing the bread, slapping it all together using only the knife.  And, of course, you could get some Berghoff beer fresh from the tap.

that's a pretty knife. If I ate meat and wanted to use it for more than bread and cutting sandwhiches in half I might see the point but for my needs? meh.

I do like the offset handles. That is the one major complaint I have about all my knives. Mainly because my grip style has changes lately. I used to choke way up and hold the back of the blade with my fingers mostly while the handle just sat against my palm for steadyness. But lately I have been holding the handle more. Not sure why, I've been trying to switch back. I think is started when I was taking lots of tomatoes apart while canning sauce and my hand got slick so my 'normal' grip got a little dangerous.

4401
All Things Food / Re: Kitchen Knives
« on: December 13, 2012, 08:51:07 AM »
[...]
Also be sure to get a sharpening Honing steel.

HTH

fixed that for you  ;)

Yes, it's very important to steel your knife every time you use it. I havn't had my knives sharpened in close to a eyar now and some of them (the ones I use most) do need it but it is amazing how much better they cut when you hone the blade before using.

By the way I have a mixed bag, mostly henckle but i have an odd man out paring knife from some off brand made in the USA company that is quite nice.

My small (6 inch) french chef get's the most use, then the 8 inch santuko. I have a 6 inch santuko as well and like it but it is third string for sure.

On the bread knife though I would say save some money and get a cheap stamped blade. They are a pain to sharpen anyway and with the serations you dont' really need to for a very long time. I have a $15 henckly stamped blade bread knife that works just fine




4402
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: nothing is Happening
« on: December 12, 2012, 03:48:25 PM »
for my second batch i was thinking of starting fermentation right away in the Carboy, then use a water bath with a fish heater in the 72 degree range what do you think?

I think 72 is to warm. Think maybe 65.

4403
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Keg Virgin Questions
« on: December 12, 2012, 12:17:27 PM »
On the priming front, you can naturally carbonate with priming sugar, just add the dissolved sugar to the keg prior to adding the beer. Seat the lid with some co2 and leave it in a warm place to carb up. It will leave more sediment in the keg but after the first pint or so it's not really a prblem unless you move the keg.

4404
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What are you tappin'?
« on: December 12, 2012, 08:56:26 AM »
Nothin really new here. Got a wit beer that turned out really nice even though it was second runnings from a barley wine, Capped the mash with some rolled oats, wheat malt, and a little extra pils (yes it was a pils based barley wine, I used what I had) tapped that the other night and was pleseantly suprised.

4405
Kegging and Bottling / Re: bottling small amount from full batch
« on: December 12, 2012, 08:48:43 AM »
I'm surprised nobody has thrown out the idea of force carbing the entire keg, then just bottling from it. You can do it as simply as a bottling wand stuffed into a picnic tap with the springy bit removed. I have a beer gun, but for 6 bottles or so its not worth breaking it out. I do this all the time.

Advantages are clearer beer in the bottles (no sediment), you know the carb level, and it's faster.

somebody did  ;)

Or bring a growler to your friends and pull a growler full after it is forced carbed but before it is all gone.

4406
Kegging and Bottling / Re: bottling small amount from full batch
« on: December 11, 2012, 11:34:36 PM »
You could put it all in a bottling bucket, add priming sugar, bottle a few and drain the rest into the keg. Let the bottled and kegged beer condition. Good to go.

That was kind of my original idea. The main thing is I want to get the bottling over with before I go over there due to a time crunch. In this instance I would have to transfer back to a cleaned and sanitized fermentation bucket for transportation since I somehow lost the lid for the bottling bucket.

I think I may have talked myself into this option even though it is probably more complicted than necessary. I think this makes sense due mainly to timing.

Okay, here is a compromise that I think will work alot better. Get the keg from your friend, transfer the whole amount of beer into the keg with the priming sugar and bottle the uncarbed beer from the keg. just force it out with minimal co2. then let the keg and the bottles condition.

4407
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: nothing is Happening
« on: December 11, 2012, 07:58:17 PM »
before Fermentation it was at 5.3%  i havent checked it recently, but i did just taste it, and it tastes like watered down beer that is really bitter, what do you experts think?

I think it's done. you said it yourself, watered down BEER wort is sweet and if nothing had happened it would probably also be somewhat sour and nasty but the yeast did their job and you now have beer! bottle it and drink it.

4408
Kegging and Bottling / Re: bottling small amount from full batch
« on: December 11, 2012, 04:45:57 PM »
Or bring a growler to your friends and pull a growler full after it is forced carbed but before it is all gone.

4409
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: IPA time
« on: December 11, 2012, 04:43:48 PM »
And if you are nervous about adding gypsum you can wait and add it to taste at packagine time.

4410
Extract/Partial Mash Brewing / Re: IPA time
« on: December 11, 2012, 12:59:58 PM »
+1 on skipping the amber malt extract. add 2 more lb pale extract, leave the medium crystal, skip the dextrine unless you have some really compelling reason to add it.

On hops I would add enough of your highest AA hops at the begining of the boil or First Wort Hop and a 60 minute to get most of your IBUs then load up at the end with the amarillo and FF and maybe some cascade as well. 1 oz each at 10, 5, and 0 and then Dry hop with a couple oz of similar mix as the late hops

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