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Messages - morticaixavier

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5746
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Palate Wrecker double brew process?
« on: February 28, 2012, 11:09:53 AM »
There's a limit though to the solubility of alpha acids in wort.  Let's say that limit is around 100 IBU's, a figure I've heard quoted before.  Going through this process isn't going to allow you to go above that level, is it?

Also, I've heard it said that at a certain point the alpha acids start breaking down.  So, assuming that is true, if you boil your hops for say, 120 minutes, you start to lose AA.  Isn't that going to happen in the second boil to the isomerized AA's already in solution?

I've heard the 100IBU limit as well. that being said I tried the mikkeller 1000IBU and it was more bitter than any beer I have ever had. Don't know if that means it's over 100IBU or not but damn it was bitter. and grassy and vegetal as well.

I boil hops for 120 minutes on my barley wine and it seems to make it more bitter than a 60 minute boil I don't know if there is a point where it will start getting less bitter but if there is I would say it's longer than 120 minutes.

5747
Kegging and Bottling / Re: cold crash....freeze??
« on: February 28, 2012, 11:07:28 AM »
I never really pay attention to how long it takes to clear, but I get it under 40 for a few days and it is usually bright.  With all of the moving around of the beer you're doing, you might not be helping.  I would find a cold spot where it won't freeze and leave it there for a few days.

Crash cooling to sediment the yeast is suitable for both kegging and bottle conditioning.

I would add that you might want to find a cold spot where the sun does not shine. even with a black tshirt over it you might get some skunking as it is doubtfull that the tshirt is 100% UV protective.

5748
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Palate Wrecker double brew process?
« on: February 28, 2012, 09:51:32 AM »
I assume they filter out the hops from the first boil so further extraction wouldn't be the goal. it would futher isomerize but that would be the same with adding hops as soon as the boil starts and boiling for 120 or more minutes.

If your first boil is essentially a half-gravity wort, wouldn't you get quite a bit better hop utilization the first time through?

yeah I suppose you would. good point.

5749
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Palate Wrecker double brew process?
« on: February 28, 2012, 09:12:20 AM »
I would think hopping the wort before remashing would certainly add more bitterness. But I don't see that you would get anything really different than doing a double mash and then hopping at 130IBU and doing a very long boil for kettle caramelization.

Maybe they were shooting for better hop extraction from the first boil? Or maybe it was the sheer volume of hops they were using. I'm having a hard time imagining the scale of 6 pounds of hops to 1 barrel, but if it was whole-leaf hops they may have run into space limitations. 6 pounds per barrel is the equivalent of using 1 pound in a 6-gallon batch, right? That sounds like a whole crapload of hops.

could be an issue of hop volume in the kettle I suppose. I have used close to 1 lb of hops to a 5 gallon batch in the past, and that was in a 1.032 beer at that. all late hops in that case. I assume they filter out the hops from the first boil so further extraction wouldn't be the goal. it would futher isomerize but that would be the same with adding hops as soon as the boil starts and boiling for 120 or more minutes.

5750
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Palate Wrecker double brew process?
« on: February 28, 2012, 08:54:42 AM »
sounds like it. double mashing is not new but using hopped boiled wort I have not heard of before. double mashing is used when your mash tun does not allow for the gravity you want. so by mashing a second batch of grain with the wort from the first you effectively double your max gravity.

I would think hopping the wort before remashing would certainly add more bitterness. But I don't see that you would get anything really different than doing a double mash and then hopping at 130IBU and doing a very long boil for kettle caramelization.

5751
Ingredients / Re: Hop breeding, varieties, shortages etc..
« on: February 28, 2012, 08:47:07 AM »
nice. I just got about a half dozen cent rhyzomes this weekend. need to get those in the ground!

5752
Wood/Casks / Re: Wood Barrels for Presentation Purposes
« on: February 28, 2012, 08:42:44 AM »
Yeah I've heard Gordon Strong's story and have learned from it.  The barrel sealed again after initial hydration.  I don't think theres any problem with that, wineries do it sometimes.

I triple rinsed the barrel last night and it is drying now.  I have a couple of bitters going now, I think I'll give a genuine cask conditioned ale a shot soon.

I'm not saying that it won't seal if it dries out just that everytime it dries out there is a chance that it won't seal again. but hey man it's your barrel. and keeping beer in it is probably the best way to make sure it doesn't dry out.

5753
Beer Recipes / Re: Black Champagne
« on: February 28, 2012, 08:37:58 AM »
I was wondering about méthode champenoise the other day, I have these wine save flip-top 'corks' that have a lever-actuated expanding rubber ring that allows you to effectively re-cork a bottle. Would those work in this case? Seems like a waste of cork (and lots more work/potential for error) to use real cork before you're clearing the yeast.

you use a crown cap before clearing the yeast. then replace with a cork after purging the 'plug'. I don't know if those wine saver corks would work.

5754
Wood/Casks / Re: Wood Barrels for Presentation Purposes
« on: February 28, 2012, 12:03:01 AM »
Wet is an environment for mold.  Dry isn't.  Keeping it full of sulfited acidic water would be an option but you leach out the oak flavor.  Not that you can't add that with some oak cubes, but it is a bit of a waste.  This is a toasted American oak barrel.

try putting a fifth of decent rum or whisky in it for storage. If you dry it out there is no guarantee that it will ever seal again correctly. you can swirl it around every week or so to make sure all the sides stay wet.

Check out morebeer's website. they have a piece on proper barrel care on there that is very informative.

If you do use booze to keep your barrel sanitary don't use a sulfur stick on it. there is a possibility of explosion.

5755
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: cold fermentation
« on: February 27, 2012, 11:52:24 PM »
Thanks guys, lots of good information here.  The conicals are great.  Sounds like best ale plan is to insulate, and set the temp at about 65.  I like 007 yeast.  We haven't done lagers yet, but may next winter.
Cameron

If you are talking ambient temp, set it for 60. if ferment temp then yeah 65 is good. Although with many yeasts you can go lower and get a really clean fermentation (I have gone down to 55-58 with good results with some yeasts.

5756
Beer Recipes / Re: Black Champagne
« on: February 27, 2012, 11:51:05 PM »
for sure! are you going to riddle and purge it ala drew's article?

5757
Kegging and Bottling / Re: cold crash....freeze??
« on: February 27, 2012, 11:49:47 PM »
If it does freeze you can always add more yeast at bottling time. It won't hurt the beer. unless it's in a carboy and freezes enough to shatter. :-[

5758
Kegging and Bottling / Re: First Time Kegging - Metallic Off-Flavor
« on: February 27, 2012, 10:41:58 AM »
The other option is to take a sample and decarbonate the beer by stirring until all of the carbonation has evolved. Taste the beer and note any off flavors.

so much more simple. good idea.

5759
Kegging and Bottling / Re: First Time Kegging - Metallic Off-Flavor
« on: February 27, 2012, 10:11:34 AM »
It could well be slight over carbonation. The carbonic bite can taste kind of metallic or minerally. try dumping presure from the kegs then shake the kegs and dump again repeat a few times and check your carb level then once it's down taste the beer.

The scottish might well show the problem more as you are expecting a lower carb level and there are less hops to cover it up.

5760
Equipment and Software / Re: DIY pumps
« on: February 27, 2012, 10:08:11 AM »
I read a piece on another forum about a guy who was building a DIY peristaltic pump from some silicon tubeing, a couple of skateboard wheels and an axle/motor thing. basically, if I remember correctly, the skateboard wheel pressed the tube between itself and the inner wall of a cylinder so when the axle rotated it would continuously squeeze the tube as it goes around. a couple of wheels keeps the action going constantly.

well that's about as clear as mud, but perhaps some of you engineer types can make something of it.

I always thought peristaltic pumps would make good brewing pumps since the liquid never leaves the tubing. Real ones are expensive though, but homemade would be great.

alright here is the link (sorry to cross post from another forum) http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/cake-pan-skateboard-wheel-bike-brakes-homemade-peristaltic-pump-279120/

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