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Messages - brewsumore

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1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: February 19, 2017, 12:11:17 AM »
My LHBS owner told me today that Wyeast will be removing that yeast from their year-round inventory soon because not enough people are buying it often enough.

Yup - they hit the lager strains hard this year:
2000 Budvar Lager
2001 Pilsen Urquell
2035 American Lager
2042 Danish Lager
3333 German Wheat
3562 Forbidden Fruit
3942 Belgian Wheat

Wow, he had mentioned the 2001 was one on a list.  Thanks for sharing that list!  I thought Forbidden Fruit was pretty popular.  I guess not, or maybe not any more!  At least the yeast I got was made this week.  I bought malt and hops for a second 10-gal batch, for the re-pitch.  We'll see how that goes - I have a second hip replacement coming up the end of March, so not sure if I'll still have viable saved yeast by the time I can brew again.

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: February 17, 2017, 11:20:11 PM »
On Monday I'll be making a Bohemian Pilsner - pretty much one of Jamil's takes and based on Pilsner Urquell, but instead of a decoction or step mash I'll be mashing single infusion at 154 - 155F, Best Pils malt with 9% carapils -- also a tad of vienna (3.5%).  All Czech saaz hops, and WY 2001. 

My LHBS owner told me today that Wyeast will be removing that yeast from their year-round inventory soon because not enough people are buying it often enough.

3
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Barrel Aging a Tripel- the memoirs
« on: February 14, 2017, 11:06:59 AM »
Ditto to what majorvices said.  The surface to liquid ratio is MUCH higher inside a 5-gal barrel as compared to a 60 gal barrel (or larger) as used by Allagash, and so you'll get an equivalent oak presence in a fraction of the time.  Yep, taste will be your best barometer.

And blending to taste will make you an old world master of the craft!

Thanks for sharing - you are definitely off to the races.  Curieux is a great beer.  I'm considering trying a version, except would just dial back and use oak pieces in secondary and not blend later. 

4
All Grain Brewing / Re: How long does it take you to brew a beer?
« on: February 11, 2017, 01:20:47 AM »
10-gal batch = 7 hrs for a simple beer, up to 9.5 hrs for a long mash/long boil/hop stand/etc., batch sparging, most times mill grist night before

My last 2 brew days I did two 10-gal batches in +10.5 hrs, but milled grist, prepped hops and sanitized fermenters the night before.

That includes set-up, clean-up, put away.

I think like Klickitat Jim I'll start prepping grist, water minerals and hops night before from now on, just to remove a few details on brew day.

5
Ingredients / Re: malts with smooth or interesting roast qualities
« on: February 05, 2017, 12:31:58 PM »
Do you guys prefer Crisp or Thomas Fawcett brown malt?  Or maybe another brand?

I don't know about the Fawcett, but the Crisp Brown malt has had a light smoke flavor that gets to the beer. It is very nice in the appropriate styles. Very nice in a London Porter.

That's the one I use as well, even though I can source the TF locally.  I have used the Crisp in Denny's BVIP, as well as porter.  I like my resource book by Dr. John Harrison, "Old British Beers and How to Make Them".  Thanks Martin.

6
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I was right!
« on: February 05, 2017, 12:27:15 PM »
Right-O!  I did check their website and saw that the MS Humulus is packaged only in 1/2 barrel and 1/6 barrel kegs.  I'll post on my area home brewers club FB page to see if I get any hits on any local establishments known to be serving it by the pint.  As you would imagine, their website also showed that lots of Spokane establishments serve Bale Breaker beer.

7
Ingredients / Re: malts with smooth or interesting roast qualities
« on: February 04, 2017, 10:54:15 PM »
Do you guys prefer Crisp or Thomas Fawcett brown malt?  Or maybe another brand?

8
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I was right!
« on: February 04, 2017, 09:01:30 PM »
I wanted to go to Hop School last year but was recovering from hip surgery.  Hopefully this year!  I'm going to have to see if any distributors here in Spokane are carrying the Bale Breaker IPA, that is if they bottle it.  Thanks for the tip Steve!

9
Equipment and Software / Re: Coleman 52 quart conversion to mash tun?
« on: January 26, 2017, 10:43:27 PM »
I dug out a 1 to 2 inch deep trench of the cooler's foam insulation all around the drain hole between the cooler walls, and used plumber's epoxy putty to cement in the correct-sized pipe nipple for my bulkhead, using a 1/2" ss ball valve connecting inside to a straight Bazooka Screen.

It is bulletproof drip free and completely solid in place, and drains like a champ.  The existing drain hole was fine on my 70-quart Coleman Extreme (I do 10-gal batches), and drains the cooler mashtun completely, when the cooler is propped up at the opposite end towards the end of runoff.

I bought 3 different length pipe nipples in advance to make sure I got one that fit the best upon inspection.


10
Ingredients / Re: Red X pH
« on: January 26, 2017, 08:13:13 PM »
Here's a Red IPA I made with 11.7% Sacchra 50 and 1.7% Carastan.  I posted the recipe at:  https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=18036.1560

FWIW, the 1.6%AA centennial hops were fresh frozen (vac sealed).

Everyone who's tried it really likes it,including me.  Both beers I've made with Sacchra 50 ( https://shop.brewcraftusa.com/en/new-from-great-western-malting/grain-gwm-sacchra-50-10-lb-4-536-kg-bag-gw-sacchra-10-1 ) have been good, although only this Red IPA did I use enough to get the red color.

As stated in the literature it's true that it does not end up too sweet, does let the malt and hops shine through, and gave the roundness/mouth feel/body that suits the style guidelines.

Try it, you'll like it!




11
Aerating wort with pure oxygen is unnecessary.

But it is quick, easy and very effective.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: RO Water
« on: January 10, 2017, 01:58:38 PM »
My city tap water does not have any chlorine or chloramines.

That's curious. The only water system that I knew of that didn't add a disinfectant was New York City. They have since started disinfecting. Are you sure? It is the law per the Clean Water Act.

Yep.  I just re-checked.  I'm in a non-municipal (or at least not with the City of Spokane) water district, and our district checks and reports water quality monthly.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: RO Water
« on: January 09, 2017, 08:07:54 PM »
My city tap water does not have any chlorine or chloramines.  So it is already pretty great although it does have fairly high alkalinity.  I brew light pilsners with 50/50 or 75/25 RO/tap water, and occasionally for other beers, but mostly rely on tap water and phosphoric acid (for lighter beers) to get my pH down into range and still end up with very good beer.  That is to say, unless brewing a beer that really benefits from soft, mineral free starting point, I just manipulate my tap water so long as that stays within the guidelines for treatment without adding undesirable flavors.  I don't like the hassle of purchasing bulk water for my 11 gal batches.  I have learned to use plastic, not glass carboys to transfer RO water from the store!

14
I do think temp control helps a little. But it doesn't take beer to "the next level" - plenty of brulosophy experiments to back that up.
"The next level" is 99% placebo effect. That's not to say placebos don't work - they can be very effective, especially where subjective judgement is concerned.

By this logic no one would do anything to make better beer because it wouldn't make much of a difference.  Go ahead, you keep not caring about taking your beer to the next level - I choose otherwise. 

And I can easily demonstrate the difference between excellent and poor beer.  It is dramatic, and it is not rooted in confirmation bias, it is rooted in process, equipment, ingredients, recipe design, etc.

+1 to the nth squared.

Still, all have the right to make the beer they like and like the beer they make - which ever way suits them.  I have no truck with that, but don't think I ever desire to drink mediocre beer.  And I've made plenty of that through the learning curve over the years.

15
  Has anyone had a batch go bad in a fermentation bucket due to a scratch in that is somehow infected?  Is this a thing?  Evidence?

Yes, many times yes.  Even soaking in bleach water for like a month didn't kill the wild beasts.  This occurred multiple times in a row so I know it was the scratch in the plastic.  All it takes is one infection to ruin many subsequent batches.  I lived it.

By chance would you still have the bucket?  I'm curious about the plastic type and what the scratches are like.  The buckets I'm using have no visible scratches and I've had no oxidation issues (with rack/dry-hop x2), and so the switch-over from glass has been great.

Yes.  I suppose you wanted me to send pictures.  I could but don't know how well they'd turn out.  Suffice it to say that these are white buckets (yes more than one) from the homebrew shop that actually say "brew bucket" or whatever the heck on the outside so they were made for this, and yes, the scratches are visible to the naked eye -- I must have impacted the sides with a spoon or whatever.  Contamination sources could have been several -- I have soured beers on purpose before, and I don't think that ever came out completely.  Also I have experienced wild fermentations, probably when a fruit fly or something climbed in through the tiny gap in the lid.  All of the above.  I found that even after a lot of cleaning and sanitizing, sometimes I would get a good batch, sometimes not.  Odds were about 50/50.  After this happened for the 5th or 6th time, I said enough, and switched to glass, and haven't looked back since.  Oh yeah...... and I did get an infection from dry hops once.  Now I soak my dry hops in vodka before adding -- not sure if that helps but I don't think it hurts.
I'm paranoid about using buckets over the fear of scratching them while nesting.

I lid them and stack one on top of the other, in a corner in my basement.  Problem solved.

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