Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - brewsumore

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 20
1
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: That German lager flavor
« on: February 23, 2015, 09:01:25 PM »
I brewed my first German pilsner this past Saturday and opted for a single infusion mash, and gambled on getting enough attenuation for a crisp, to style beer based on the assumption that my (and most mainstream malts) are highly modified. 

From that starting point, I did everything else I know to create a highly fermentable wort, including a 90 minute mash with dough-in at or just under 149F.  I'll see how fermentable the wort actually ends up, but I did get 79% brewhouse efficiency, and expected good attenuation and efficiency based on a few other good practices including: 1) omitting any crystal malts and using a reputable pilsner malt (Best Malz), 2) crushed until scared, 3) 1.71 qts per lb mash ratio, 4) +3 minutes stirring the sparge (batch sparge), 5) ~167F sparge temp, 6) careful water chemistry, i.e. nailing Kai's GP water profile, and hitting ~5.25 - 5.3 pH for the mash, and 5.1 pH in the kettle, 7) addition of yeast nutrient in the boil, 8 ) 3 minutes aeration with straight o2, 9) pitching plenty of yeast (rehydrated 34/70 dry yeast based on Mr Malty calculator).

I am following up with slow-ramped cool ferment, to reduce likelihood of diacetyl and to keep flavors clean.

Time will tell.

Oh yeah, other than pilsner malt I used 3.3% melanoidin, which might help capture "that German lager flavor".

Not intending to second guess at least a 2-step step mash - I see that Randy Mosher also identifies that as the standard minimum practice for a Euro Pilsner in "Mastering Homebrew".  BTW, I love this book!

2
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing This Weekend? 2/13/15
« on: February 20, 2015, 08:37:27 PM »
Tomorrow I will be making 11 gal of single infusion mash (149 - 150F) German Pilsner.  Continental pilsner malt (Best Malz) plus 3% melanoidin.  Magnum, hallertau mittelfruh, and spalt hops, and 34/70 yeast rehydrated, and plan to pitch cool around 48F, and after a few days hold at 52 - 54F for remaining ferment.

3
Equipment and Software / New batch sparge picnic cooler mashtun build
« on: February 15, 2015, 10:42:08 PM »
Thought I'd share notes from today's new build.  First of all, this is my first MT build in a long time that is not using a blue Rubbermaid cooler and it hurts just a little bit. 

I bought a Coleman Extreme 70 qt rectangular picnic cooler, since it already had a drain hole in the right size and place, since it is a 5-day cooler, because the cooler interior is standard (no weird contours), and since I have seen how popular the Extremes are in the homebrewing community.  I do 11 gal batches.

I switched from braid to straight bazooka screen I believe about 8 years ago.  It works great.

This build was different than those I did previously, in that I used epoxy putty between the cooler walls to solidly reinforce that area, and to putty in the pipe nipple.  This idea was given to me by Maxieboy on NB Forum almost exactly 6 years ago and now is the first chance I've had to try it, since I recently cracked my other smaller MT (inadvertently kicked the ball valve).  Maxieboy, if you're out there, THANKS!  This thing appears to be basically bulletproof, meaning built to last, with no leaks or rot at all.

Photos follow but here's how it went today, with excellent results:

1) I used a 2 1/2" long, 1/2" ID pipe nipple, not shown in the photo, which worked just right with my materials.
2) After removing the drain plug, using a long, slender, small head screwdriver, my finger, and a dust buster, I removed ~2.5" insulating foam all the way around the hole, and it took some time and care, especially since I also scraped the inside walls bare of sprayed foam in this circumference, to create a bonding surface.  2" would have been plenty, and would have required a bit less putty.
3) After thinking about it and sight-testing it, I realized that I would need more of the pipe nipple and pipe threads on the outside of the cooler, less on the inside.
4) I screwed the ball valve all the way onto one end of the loose pipe nipple, and marked the top of the pipe with magic marker as the "up" position when installed.
5) I wrapped the pipe nipple threads with masking tape everywhere I planned not to have putty, transferring the "up" mark onto the tape.
6) I kneaded and then stuffed epoxy putty (check Home Depot/other HW store plumbing section) to completely, firmly fill the cavity.  I used the Rectorseal brand, at $3.81 per tube.  It took seven 2-ounce tubes.  Look for the more economical 4-ounce size.  I had underestimated and originally bought only three tubes so had to run back to the store mid-project.  After kneading, you only have 2 - 3 minutes to work the putty before it QUICKLY sets hard -- it sets to like steel in 15 to 20 minutes. 
7) immediately after packing the cavity with putty, I used what I needed of what was left to pack a little collar of putty around the exposed outside of the pipe nipple up to the tape.
8 ) I stuffed the putty-wrapped pipe into the hole, removed the excess, and using my finger quickly packed a little more putty into the remaining outside crack, inside and outside of the cooler where the pipe protruded.
9) again quickly, I pulled off the masking tape before the putty smeared onto it had a chance to set hard.
10) an hour later I tightened down my silicone washers backed by SS washers, and bazooka screen inside, and brass nut outside.  The silicone washers cover the hardened residue of putty.  Also, although not really needed to prevent leakage (the putty does that by itself), the silicone washer/SS washer/nuts balance each side with equal opposing pressure, so there' not constant pressure on the hardened putty. 
11) There's plenty of room on either side of the bazooka screen to stir with my mash paddle without hitting the screen.

Rectorseal Epoxy Putty MSDS:  http://ows.rectorseal.com/product-data/epoxy-putty/RectorSeal%20EP200%20EP400%20Epoxy%20Putty.html














4
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Omega Y-06 German Lager
« on: February 15, 2015, 12:02:10 PM »
I have tried and I like this yeast.  I assume it is a Wiehenstephaner, but would love to know if someone knows with certainty.

I guess you've already seen their website description.  I can't say with certainty, but it sure appears to be the weihenstephan yeast:  http://www.omegayeast.com/?portfolio=german-lager

5
Yeast and Fermentation / Should I refrigerate dry yeast
« on: February 14, 2015, 09:48:09 PM »
So, for years, I have found some LHBS's that store their dry yeast at room temp, other refrigerated.  My standard operating procedure either way, has been to toss the yeast packets into my fridge when I get home thinking that most companies recommend this for extended, higher percentage viability.

Until this week when I bought some set out at room temp, and asked the owner why he doesn't store it refrigerated.

His answer was that he used to work at a brewery that used dry yeast, and their practice was to store it at room temp with the understanding that temp swings, i.e. putting it into the fridge from warm, actually ruptured cell walls, making the yeast less viable than if they maintained storage of it at room temp, and I believe this was with the understanding of using it within 3 months.

When I buy dried yeast, should I put it in the fridge for anywhere between a few days and a few months, or should I leave it at room temp?

6
Ingredients / Re: Is German magnum a noble hop?
« on: February 11, 2015, 10:25:32 AM »
RE:  "...since that DOES logically play into making the most authentic, quality versions of the style via hops selection."

I reflect that the use of the word "authentic" is somewhat subjective, since as part of the discussion we've already discovered that plenty of German commercial brewers, and US commercial brewers creating this style, do use non-noble hops for bittering, since it is an obvious choice for production and economic reasons via a cost-benefit comparison, and/or possibly for the polyphenols reason or other chemistry-based reasons. 

Therefore, I guess I meant to say: "...since that DOES logically play into making the most authentic old-world, quality versions of the style via hops selection." 

7
Ingredients / Re: Is German magnum a noble hop?
« on: February 11, 2015, 10:07:11 AM »
Thanks Jeff, and Thirsty Monk.  I had found a fascinating and thought-provoking thread with M. Brungard and AJ DeLange, both of whose advice I highly regard, debating over the importance of brewing German pilsner with all noble hops.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/brewing-ag-german-pilsner-need-help-guidance-water-profile-485138/

I remain confident that my beer will turn out well, if brew day goes well, I just wanted to know!  It is obviously somewhat academic, in light of the fact that I am brewing a variation on the recipe printed in AHA as Steve Mifsud's 2013 NHC Pilsner Category gold medal winner, "German Pils". 

Due to my faith in ProMash's accuracy at gauging predicted IBUs, I felt that the recipe (link below), has some intentional or unintentional typos, thus I tweaked it to hit the recipe total IBUs target, and am using phosphoric acid instead of acidulated malt, and am using 34/70 instead of Munich Lager yeast, and Jeff, per your previous recommendations, am going all RO water to build Kai's GP water profile.  So I hope you will wish me luck!

http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/GermanPils

And yes, I am using German magnum hops - all German hops, from Yakima Valley Hops imported varieties, 2013 crop.

Yeah, but if you talk to a couple German brewmasters they are most likely to tell you that using the nobel hops for bittering is a waste of hops (and wort!).

Yeah, and at the homebrew level we don't need to split hairs - good is good.  My point about not saying "oh no!" to using magnum if a non-noble.  Duh, the recipe won NHC Gold!

Still, I'm one of those people who, although very little experience tasting quality German lagers, would go with additional noble pellet hops for bittering to try to copy the best German pilsner, if that's what it takes.  Ultimately, with my palate and skill, I'm not concerned in the least.

However, I am going to research more about the impact of hops selection for GP based on total oil percentages, and individual hop compounds of the hops, since noble hops are considerably different from other hops in those regards, and since that DOES logically play into making the most authentic, quality versions of the style via hops selection.

8
Ingredients / Re: Is German magnum a noble hop?
« on: February 10, 2015, 09:55:50 PM »
Thanks Jeff, and Thirsty Monk.  I had found a fascinating and thought-provoking thread with M. Brungard and AJ DeLange, both of whose advice I highly regard, debating over the importance of brewing German pilsner with all noble hops.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f128/brewing-ag-german-pilsner-need-help-guidance-water-profile-485138/

I remain confident that my beer will turn out well, if brew day goes well, I just wanted to know!  It is obviously somewhat academic, in light of the fact that I am brewing a variation on the recipe printed in AHA as Steve Mifsud's 2013 NHC Pilsner Category gold medal winner, "German Pils". 

Due to my faith in ProMash's accuracy at gauging predicted IBUs, I felt that the recipe (link below), has some intentional or unintentional typos, thus I tweaked it to hit the recipe total IBUs target, and am using phosphoric acid instead of acidulated malt, and am using 34/70 instead of Munich Lager yeast, and Jeff, per your previous recommendations, am going all RO water to build Kai's GP water profile.  So I hope you will wish me luck!

http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/GermanPils

And yes, I am using German magnum hops - all German hops, from Yakima Valley Hops imported varieties, 2013 crop.

9
Ingredients / Re: Smoked hop IPA
« on: February 10, 2015, 09:20:01 PM »
First of all Major, I applaud your creation of those "special" beers!

This past weekend I was thinking "smoked IPA", except my approach was to smoke some thawed fall chinook salmon and can it up. 

After giving it some time in the jar for flavors to meld, it will go on crackers served with plenty of cold IPA.

Half of the fish got painted with maple syrup and air-dried before going into the smoker, with jalapeno  slices in the bottom of each jar before going into the pressure canner. 

Hey, people (me too) go crazy over peppy, little bit sweet and salty/sour, smoky flavors WITH cold beer.  And I guess for most of us that includes meat/fowl/fish as the delivery system.  So for your next "smoked" beer creation maybe you would consider a smoked chiles and meat beer, possibly with other (smoked?) natural grown-from-the-earth ingredients!

Somebody would make that beer, or have in numerous variations no doubt.   

I feel that most people honestly prefer the safety of going with proven combinations of specialty gourmet (or just good-tasting) foods together with well-paired beer; but singularly unique festival-in-a-glass craft-brewing is sometimes a stronger attraction than proven-result food and beer pairings.

We all know this.

Still, I still wonder when I'll get back and again brew your kaffir lime leaves, galangal saison.  Man, what a beer!

Anyway, again thanks for sharing your ongoing various innovations, now obviously as a pro. 

And hopefully as well as enlightenment through the journey, you will also achieve rewards for the fruits of your labors.  Maybe try an "ahhh, grasshopper" beer?  I need a beer.  No, I want a beer.   :)

10
Ingredients / Is German magnum a noble hop?
« on: February 10, 2015, 08:17:13 PM »
It appears that it is a variant of hallertau gold or tradition (per beersmith link below) and so I deduce (and the article states) it is a noble hop, but I wanted to get confirmation, since at least what I ordered is a high-alpha hop, advertised as 12 - 14%AA (http://www.yakimavalleyhops.com/Magnum2oz_p/hopsgrmagnum3.htm )

http://beersmith.com/blog/2012/02/05/noble-hops-for-european-beer-styles/

I'm brewing my first German Pils this Sunday, and want to know "for the record" if I'm using all noble hops, including the magnum as a bittering hop.

The other two hops in the recipe definitely are noble hops:  hallertau mittelfruh and spalt.

Thanks!

11
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Making progress with SWMBO
« on: January 27, 2015, 09:10:57 AM »
Good tip on Burman - haven't checked them in a long time.  And sometimes I order from MoreCoffee to fill out an order from MoreBeer to get to $59 for free shipping!  Now back to your originally scheduled program...  I currently don't have any SWMBO so can't share my experiences.

12
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Making progress with SWMBO
« on: January 26, 2015, 07:35:09 PM »
I set my roaster on top of a BBQ OUTSIDE, next to an electric outlet on my covered patio off of the detached garage.  I set the roaster timer during the two phases (roasting and then cooling), then go inside and set the stove timer for just a bit less time, and putter around the kitchen while roasting beans outside, going back outside in time to be back to the roaster in time to hit the degree of roast I want.  No smoke inside the house for me.  No sirree!  :)

Edit:  FWIW, my roaster is the FreshRoast SR500 and I love it.

13
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Making progress with SWMBO
« on: January 26, 2015, 07:02:20 PM »
My wife would not drink beer until she got cravings for it during her second pregnancy. Don't freak out, she'd only have one every now and then, but now she only drinks wine with her friends.

What scares me is that now she is starting to get a taste for coffee. And I already have a son who is drinking at least a cup of my $15+ dollar a pound coffee, and a pound of coffee barely makes it through the week. :(

You're probably already aware of this option but here goes:  Years ago, my homebrewing hobby got me started on homeroasting coffee.  Been doing it ever since and everyone loves it (if I'm of a mind to share), and it's quick, I never run out, it's always fresh and roasted only in the amount I want at a time (like a week's worth), typically de-gassed and ready to drink by the next day.  Green beans are like legumes; they store dry in bags in a drawer with no appreciable loss of quality for up to two years, meaning you can get a big order that will last a long time, thereby saving on shipping costs.  Great primer and selection (last time I checked) at www.sweetmarias.com (no affiliation, yadda yadda).  Different roasters available depending on how much you roast at a time and you'll save a bunch of money compared to buying gourmet roasted coffee.

14
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: WA area brewers!
« on: January 05, 2015, 10:34:12 PM »
I wish you would come farther east to Spokane!  I am a member of the local homebrew club here Inland Brewers Unite, and am acquainted with our two LHBS's if you need a PR front man!

All I need is for someone to cover my expenses!

 :)  I'll make some inquiries and PM you.

15
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: WA area brewers!
« on: January 04, 2015, 10:06:17 PM »
 I wish you would come farther east to Spokane!  I am a member of the local homebrew club here Inland Brewers Unite, and am acquainted with our two LHBS's if you need a PR front man!

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 20