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Messages - brewsumore

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46
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Backsweetening Cider
« on: August 29, 2017, 05:24:56 PM »
I guess I started making hard cider 20 years ago, and just fermented dry, added bottling sugar and carbonated in bottles.  It was kind of enjoyable, but super dry and not much apple taste.  I solved this dilemma by going to kegging and now I ferment dry and then backsweeten with 1.5 cans apple juice frozen concentrate per corny - as fresh and natural as possible (Washington grown Tree Top brand).  My kegerator stays at 34 F - plenty cold to prevent refermentation.

However, for those who only bottle but want a little sweetness, in my research I was especially drawn to the method as follows, which takes a pretty good knack (or trial and error) for estimation:

1) ferment until your desired degree of sweetness + a little more sweetness for carbonation.  Or ferment dry and add enough apple juice concentrate to carbonate plus sweeten.

2) bottle, cap and carbonate for a few days (maybe 5?) until you figure it has enough carbonation, but not too much!

3) run your full bottles in your dishwasher on a cycle that you calculate will pasteurize the cider, meaning kill the yeast by staying at 160F or a bit more for at least 20 minutes.  Voila.  Backsweetened carbonated bottled hard cider.  I recall a guy saying he lost a broken bottle here and there until he got the dishwasher cycle right - whether full cycle or interrupted.

Just an idea for a hardy enterprising adventurous person!

47
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: High temp ferment in buckets
« on: August 29, 2017, 03:54:24 PM »
Food-grade HDPE won't leach anything until at least 110°C.

Which is 230F.  Cool!  Thanks Sean.

48
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: High temp ferment in buckets
« on: August 29, 2017, 02:56:53 PM »
Sure.  A plastic bucket is no different than any other fermenter in that regard.

Ok. Cool!  I just figured glass (carboy) or SS are completely inert, whereas more pliable (looser molecules?) plastic might just a little bit possibly be more prone to a threshold for flavor impact due to temperature.  Well, below melting point.   :o

I think I'll RDWHAHB - at least at happy hour.

49
General Homebrew Discussion / High temp ferment in buckets
« on: August 29, 2017, 02:42:52 PM »
I've gone mid-high 80's before with no problems, but curious if anyone has experienced off flavors from fermenting at ultra-high temp in well-cleaned and sanitized plastic brewing buckets - of course not associated with other brewing faults, such as from chlorinated water, improper pitch rate or yeast health, minimal aeration, lack of nutrients, etc.

So just based on plastic bucket at high temp.

I have a couple buckets temp-controlled holding at 90F (beer temp) for my version of Randy Mosher's Saison Buffoon using Wyeast Saison Yeast (WY 3724),and just curious of other people's experience.

FWIW, I pitched at around 92F and have held it at 90F since then.

50
All Grain Brewing / Re: When to check mash pH
« on: August 29, 2017, 10:12:37 AM »
I check mine about 12 minutes after dough-in, and again at the end of the mash, and then often I check the kettle pH.  I use ColorpHast strips so it's quick and easy.  I check as soon as possible so that in case I need to make an adjustment that most of the conversion hasn't already taken place.  And I like to keep the picnic cooler mashtun lid down to maintain mash temp so normally only check once, and just crack the lid, re-checking mash temp same time.

51
All Grain Brewing / Re: When to check mash pH
« on: August 28, 2017, 10:38:02 PM »
Definitely don't check mash pH in the first 10 minutes. Those reactions take a little while to occur. The pH will change during the course of a mash. It is the final pH that's most important.

It's also really important that the brewer mix all the minerals and acids into the water before adding the grain. It's really hard to mix all that stuff together evenly otherwise.

Given the prevalence of mediocre beer from various brewpubs, it should be no surprise that many brewers don't adjust their water. Don't be one of those brewers.

Y'er darn tootin'!!  Give 'em Hell Harry!  I mean, Martin.

52
All Grain Brewing / Re: How long do you cold crash your beer
« on: August 26, 2017, 07:56:16 PM »
I temp control ferment normally two buckets at a time, in a dedicated ferment fridge.  If I am making a beer with a lot of suspended yeast such as a Belgian, or using a low flocc yeast I remove the blowoff tube from where it fits in the lid and replace it with a rubber or silicone stopper while cold crashing, before racking to kegs.  I learned the hard way that when you change the ferment chamber from warm to cold and have a filled airlock in place it sucks that liquid into your beer.  Ewww!  Still, physics is physics and so o2 is going to bypass the stopper and what previously was a solid co2 blanket over your beer is now partially diffused with oxygen.  I don't think I'm OCD but especially with hoppy beers I see oxygen as the enemy, and so limit my cold crash to 24 hrs at 30F.  I keep my kegerator cold (at 34F) so a little yeast in the keg, what doesn't come out at the first pour, isn't going to matter. I hope that's not too much detail!

I too fine in the kettle with whirfloc.

53
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: My new hydra chiller
« on: August 26, 2017, 07:37:14 PM »
I just ordered one.  I'd looked at the possibility before but had missed that they custom build them.My two keggles can only handle a 10" wide chiller.  Cool!  I wanted a faster chiller, but also wanted a second chiller so days I brew 20 gallons, using two mashtuns, and two keggles/burners, I won't have to chill one batch, and then the other.  This way I can run a splitter below my outdoor faucet and chill either/both batches when it's time to do so, using two IC's.

BTW, when SS chillers first came routinely available I bought a 25-footer and used it maybe twice.  Super slow compared to copper as stated above, and IMHO not worth it, although I don't brew LODO.

54
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What's Brewing this Weekend?
« on: August 25, 2017, 08:30:34 PM »
Tomorrow going to brew 10 gal of Mosher's Saison Buffoon, using WY 3724. 

55
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: I think I have to have this....
« on: August 22, 2017, 10:36:19 PM »
I'm still doing fine with ColorpHast strips.

56
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pliny the Elder
« on: August 14, 2017, 11:32:39 PM »
Blind pig made by who?
Russian River Blind Pig IPA. Here is a clone recipe.
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/homebrew-recipe/russian-river-blind-pig-ipa-clone/

I made and currently have on tap this recipe for Blind Pig and can vouch that it makes a delicious beer! 

I've also made and enjoyed very much the AHA recipe for Pliney the Elder.  However, I never understood why the recipe estimates 90 - 95 IBUs, while the actually Pliney comes in IIRC at 72 IBUs.  Maybe the earlier version was a hoppier beer.  Can anyone explain the discrepancy?
If you read the article that had the recipe in Zymurgy, Vinnie said it tested at 95 IBU in the lab. A few years later Mitch Steele's IPA book came out, and it tested at 65 IBUs in Stone's lab. Other's have said 65 IBUs in their Labs.

Russian River uses Hop extract for bittering, dialing it back is easy. Why would he do that? My guess is to make it easier to drink more. Many of the west coast IPAs seem less abrasive to me. Oh, I had a couple Plinys in the LA area last January, and they seemed less bitter than ~10 years ago.

I think the IBU wars are over, now it is the haze wars.

Thanks Jeff.  That makes sense.  However, I must admit that when I've done a side by side, my clone just tasted more hoppy and bitter.   Cheers.

57
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pliny the Elder
« on: August 13, 2017, 11:42:32 AM »
Blind pig made by who?
Russian River Blind Pig IPA. Here is a clone recipe.
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/homebrew-recipe/russian-river-blind-pig-ipa-clone/

I made and currently have on tap this recipe for Blind Pig and can vouch that it makes a delicious beer! 

I've also made and enjoyed very much the AHA recipe for Pliney the Elder.  However, I never understood why the recipe estimates 90 - 95 IBUs, while the actually Pliney comes in IIRC at 72 IBUs.  Maybe the earlier version was a hoppier beer.  Can anyone explain the discrepancy? 

58
Equipment and Software / Re: Wrap or Pad for Chest Freezer?
« on: July 17, 2017, 08:01:44 PM »
I recommend a ferm wrap taped against the inside wall, hooked to a temperature controller.  I do that to ferment two buckets at a time and it works fine -- with the probe in a thermowell placed through a hole drilled in the bucket lid.  I've done this for years.

59
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Purge keg with Iodophor
« on: July 17, 2017, 07:45:18 PM »
Personally, I would go with Saniclean and not Iodophor but again, each to their own.

60
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Summertime beer cocktails
« on: July 14, 2017, 04:19:48 PM »

2nd, michelada.  Used V8 spicy, a healthy dose of lime juice, Valentina hot sauce (black label hot), worcestershire, and LB.  Not a fan but I think it is the worcestershire that really put me off.  Not ruling it out until I try a few at restaurants.  We have several real mexican places. 


The trick is restraint:  less is more.  It's still beer you're drinking.  Sometimes for 2/3 pint of beer I add only 2 oz tomato juice -- and nothing pre-flavored or pre-spiced.  And as far as tabasco and worcestershire (optional), we're talking literally one shake and done, just as if it was bitters.  And tease it with fresh lime juice - like 1/4 of a lime tops. 

The way it's done matters in terms of not-so-good vs. excellente.

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