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Been doing that for a long time. Other things that are antioxidants are cinnamon and coriander.

I'd heard that about the spices, but not the campden. I have plenty on hand that I use for ciders. Think I'll give it a try. Thanks !
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Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Another eventful shopping spree
« Last post by tumarkin on Today at 04:54:50 AM »
Nice selection!!

FYI for all interested in Samichlaus, Sami has 3 varians Classic, Helles, and Schwarzbier (new). The Classic should be available year round. The Helles and Schwarz will be seasonal and rotate with each other every six months.
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Been doing that for a long time. Other things that are antioxidants are cinnamon and coriander.
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Since you bring it up, I've been wondering about the difference in modification between continental and "domestic" (I'm on the continent, so technically, they're domestic to me) malts. The article below makes the claim that continental malts are less modified. It seems like a pretty general statement to me. Anybody have any idea if there is any merit to the claim?
http://beerandbrewing.com/VMvilisAAKGj51nr/article/belgian-beer-youre-probably-doing-it-wrong

(Besides that, I thought it was a great article)

Less modified when compared to American malts, but still fully modified. If you look at the Kohlbach index (S/T ratio), even the floor malted Moravian Malt that Weyermann has is 38.4, while anything at or over 38 is fully modified. American malts can be close to 50.

Barley variety and the climate have big influences on the final product.
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Commercial Beer Reviews / Re: Another eventful shopping spree
« Last post by HoosierBrew on Today at 04:45:01 AM »
Nice haul, Frank. I'd love to see the Firestone make its way here. And the Surly.
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From something I picked up on the old HBD back in the late 90s early 2000s timeframe, as to mix a campden tablet into the mash. The SO2 is an antioxidant that inhibits the oxidation of the malt compounds that lead to stalling. Any remaining SO2 is driven off in the boil.

Never heard that one.  Good info.
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From something I picked up on the old HBD back in the late 90s early 2000s timeframe, as to mix a campden tablet into the mash. The SO2 is an antioxidant that inhibits the oxidation of the malt compounds that lead to stalling. Any remaining SO2 is driven off in the boil.
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Hi
Despite my heroic efforts to reduce exposure to air when transferring hoppy beers from FV to keg (and keg to keg), I was recently upset to find out that an otherwise very good hoppy american session ale was starting to show signs of oxidation - short finish, cardboard taste. This was in a keg. I read up on this problem, which I observe in hoppy beers more than other styles. In the Beersmith podcast with charlie bamforth on beer stability CB states that you can get rid of this flaw with yeast. So i decided to put it to the test. I made a small starter using mauribrew dried yeast and pitched into the keg when it was at high krauesen. Have left it for a week or so now. I tasted it last night and the oxidation flavour (trans 2 nonal I believe) has gone!

There is however a hint of diacetyl, which I hope will disappear with time. It is certainly nicer than the "untreated" beer and has gone from being a tipper into a drinker.

In the podcast CB also talks about using sodium metabisulphite as a precautionary measure to improve stability and reduce oxidation. I think I will try this for a subsequent hoppy style as I am quite sensitive to oxidised flavour in hoppy beers and I don't like tipping beer. Not too worried about rheinheitsgebot..

Anyway, if you encounter this issue, adding yeast in the keg appears to resolve it, so worth a go..

cheers
steve
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: continental vs domestic malt flavors
« Last post by dmtaylor on Today at 04:22:16 AM »
Even if true, it's irrelevant.  Every malt out there is well modified these days.  A few years ago when I purposely tried to source an undermodified malt for a traditional decoction mash, I came up empty handed -- it didn't exist.
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: continental vs domestic malt flavors
« Last post by theoman on Today at 03:54:13 AM »
Since you bring it up, I've been wondering about the difference in modification between continental and "domestic" (I'm on the continent, so technically, they're domestic to me) malts. The article below makes the claim that continental malts are less modified. It seems like a pretty general statement to me. Anybody have any idea if there is any merit to the claim?
http://beerandbrewing.com/VMvilisAAKGj51nr/article/belgian-beer-youre-probably-doing-it-wrong

(Besides that, I thought it was a great article)
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