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11
Pull a sample after the boil begins, cool down as close as possible to the ideal temp for your hydrometer, measure.
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That sounds like a great idea.  Thanks
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I don't BIAB so I don't know if 59% is typical mash efficiency or not.
Since you don't sparge, the gravity of the wort in your boil kettle will be uniform no matter when you take the sample.
The amount of sugar in the 7.1 gals that you started with doesn't change.
So, the more water you boil off, the higher the sugar content of the remaining water.
Apparently, you boiled off more water than your original calculation anticipated.

My typical efficiency is 72% to 75%, and I anticipated the amount of water lost in absorption and evaporation.

But thanks for your comment.
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All Grain Brewing / Re: Trouble with mash efficiency calculation.
« Last post by mainebrewer on Today at 09:01:29 AM »
I don't BIAB so I don't know if 59% is typical mash efficiency or not.
Since you don't sparge, the gravity of the wort in your boil kettle will be uniform no matter when you take the sample.
The amount of sugar in the 7.1 gals that you started with doesn't change.
So, the more water you boil off, the higher the sugar content of the remaining water.
Apparently, you boiled off more water than your original calculation anticipated.
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Beer Recipes / Re: Re evaluating hefeweizen hatred
« Last post by JJeffers09 on Today at 08:59:36 AM »
Dough in at 110F and hold for 10-15m before you jump to your next temp to get your 4vg working.


You need a high (meaning not acidified in any way) pH and at least 30 minutes for anything to really happen.. FYI.

That's right, not insanely high, 5.7-8 then acidify your mash after the acid rest. Which a Munich water profile should be pretty easy to get that ballpark at the start of your mash.  However, correct me if I am wrong, I believe it takes at least long enough for 4VG to develop before the pH actually drops to an ideal pH range for mashing if you are not using acid.
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Homebrew Clubs / Re: Club Night 2017
« Last post by udubdawg on Today at 08:52:08 AM »
Well we had a blast at club night.  Not sure if anyone from this thread stopped by, but we were pretty busy most of the night.  Our beers were really well received, and we have 4 of our kegs pop.  We're trying to figure out the logistics for Portland, so that we can serve again next year.

unfortunately despite sharing a "wall" I never stopped by.  Busy busy.

As I doubt KCBM will bring all that stuff to Portland, I could probably help you out next year if your club decides to try to serve again.  I'll be doing an extended road trip and be looking for a spot to pour anyway.
cheers--
--Michael
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All Grain Brewing / Re: Trouble with mash efficiency calculation.
« Last post by Stevie on Today at 08:50:14 AM »
Pull a sample after the boil begins, cool down as close as possible to the ideal temp for your hydrometer, measure.
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Homebrew Clubs / Re: Club Night 2017
« Last post by Schemy on Today at 08:36:42 AM »
Well we had a blast at club night.  Not sure if anyone from this thread stopped by, but we were pretty busy most of the night.  Our beers were really well received, and we have 4 of our kegs pop.  We're trying to figure out the logistics for Portland, so that we can serve again next year. 
18
General Homebrew Discussion / Win free yeast and swag!
« Last post by denny on Today at 08:36:28 AM »
https://www.experimentalbrew.com/contest

Win a Wyeast and Experimental Brewing Swag Bag!

For Q3, Denny and Drew have chosen a bunch of yeast strains to take advantage of the summer heat to make some damn fine beer! Here are the Q3 strains (releasing to homebrew shop in July 2017!)
3739-PC FLANDERS GOLDEN ALE™

    This well-balanced strain from northern Belgium will produce moderate levels of both fruity esters and spicy phenols while finishing dry with a hint of malt. Flanders Golden Ale is a robust and versatile strain that performs nicely in a broad range of Belgian styles.

3789-PC TRAPPIST STYLE BLEND™

    A unique blend of Belgian Saccharomyces and Brettanomyces for emulating Trappist style beer from the Florenville region in Belgium. Phenolics, mild fruitiness, and complex spicy notes develop with increased fermentation temperatures. This blend will produce subdued but classic Brett character.

3822-PC BELGIAN DARK ALE™

    This unique Belgian ale yeast is a high acid producer with balanced ester and phenol production allowing a good expression of malt profile, especially the strong flavors of darker malts and sugars. Spicy, tart, and dry on the palate with a very complex finish.

Now the question is - what would you make with these strains? Winners get to brew them!
The High Level:

Pick a yeast, generate your recipe, give it an awesome name and email contest@experimentalbrew.com by July 31st!. Denny, Drew and folks from Wyeast will evaluate the entries for quality, fun and expression of the best of Wyeast's strains characters!
The Rules:

    Send entries to contest@experimentalbrew.com
    Entries must be received by 11:59PM on July 31st 2017
    One entry per person
    Winners of each yeast will be picked Drew, Denny and representives from Wyeast.
    Three (3) winners will be chosen, one per yeast strain, and will receive swag and prizes from Experimental Brewing & Wyeast
    Winners agree to let Wyeast use, distribute and publish the recipes
    Judging is completely subjective and winners will be chosen by the judges opinions of the entries quality and expression of the fun and interest of brewing. (aka it looks good to the judges!)
19
All Grain Brewing / Trouble with mash efficiency calculation.
« Last post by Lazy Ant Brewing on Today at 08:33:25 AM »
I do BIAB no sparge, with recipes I modify and calculate in Excel  using the formulas from Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels. 

I had been brewing 5-gal batches in a 10-gal pot, but recently began calculating a recipe for 6-gals.  This of course, leads to a larger grain bill.  My calculations were as follows: 13 lbs. of grain adjusted for the extract potential of each type of malt at a stated mash efficiency of 75 % predicting a Target OG of 1.055 using 8.36 gals of treated water for mashing, draining and squeezing the bag to extract all the wort I can, then boiling for one hour.

At the end of the mash, I had 7.1 gals of wort with a hydrometer reading of 1.0364 (adjusted for temperature).  Dividing the total gravity of the wort (7.1 times 36.4) or 258.44 by Potential GUs at 100% efficiency (440) yields a calculated mash efficiency of 58.78 %. 

Lousy yield!  But after the boil when I take a hydrometer reading adjusting for temperature,  my Measured OG is 1.0551 -- exactly what the original formula predicted using a mash efficiency of 75%!

So how can I get the predicted OG, if my efficiency is that far off.

The only thing I can think of is that somehow the sample of wort (which has hop debris and occasionally some grains that escaped the grain bag) that I am using to calculate the mash efficiency is not representative of the gravity of the entire volume of the wort.

The next time I brew, I may try straining the wort sample before I take a hydrometer reading to  calculate my mash efficiency.

Thanks is advance for any helpful comments and advice.   
 
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Does 7-10 days sound a bit quick for a porter?

It's highly dependent on gravity, pitching rate, strain, and temperature, but as a very general rule an ale taking more than 10 days to reach FG would indicate a problem.
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