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11
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Kill temp for yeast
« Last post by alestateyall on Today at 11:38:21 AM »
Is your goal to pasteurize or are you wondering when yeast starts dying as temp increases?

Pasteurization kills all the yeast rather than some. So their is a recommended temp and time at that temp to achieve pasteurization.
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General Homebrew Discussion / The Decline of Homebrewing
« Last post by Stevie on Today at 11:19:52 AM »
I wasn't disagreeing. That was more towards those that give up. But, in all honesty, making decent beer is way easier than making bread.
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General Homebrew Discussion / The Decline of Homebrewing
« Last post by alestateyall on Today at 10:46:01 AM »
I think one reason people quit is home brewing is not easy to get right on the first few batches. Especially if you are used to good quality craft beer. Your first few batches will not compare.
Maybe, but who knocks pizza dough or bread out the park first time? Maybe risk/reward is high due to the amount of time.

I do brew to save money. Beer is stupid expensive right now. $6+ bombers, $10+ six packs, $7+ pints. If I factored the time at minimum wage, I'd still be saving on a 10 gallon batch. I think it is unfair to factor time when it is also my hobby. If i wasn't brewing, I'd be out spending or watching tv.
I think many people quit all kinds of things that are hard.  Lots of people receive home brew equipment as a gift, give a try a few times and move on.

I agree home brewing is cheaper as long as you don't count the value of your time and probably you need to exclude equipment cost. The way I see it equipment and time are costs associated with my hobby. Ingredients, fuel, CO2 are costs associated with the beer.
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: The Decline of Homebrewing
« Last post by Stevie on Today at 10:41:46 AM »
I think one reason people quit is home brewing is not easy to get right on the first few batches. Especially if you are used to good quality craft beer. Your first few batches will not compare.
Maybe, but who knocks pizza dough or bread out the park first time? Maybe risk/reward is high due to the amount of time.

I do brew to save money. Beer is stupid expensive right now. $6+ bombers, $10+ six packs, $7+ pints. If I factored the time at minimum wage, I'd still be saving on a 10 gallon batch. I think it is unfair to factor time when it is also my hobby. If i wasn't brewing, I'd be out spending or watching tv.
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General Homebrew Discussion / The Decline of Homebrewing
« Last post by alestateyall on Today at 10:25:57 AM »
I think one reason people quit is home brewing is not easy to get right on the first few batches. Especially if you are used to good quality craft beer. Your first few batches will not compare.
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Yeast and Fermentation / fermenting IPA with spunding valve
« Last post by Stevie on Today at 10:13:43 AM »
Here is one on Amazon
Ridgid 32975 1/8-Inch to 5/8-Inch Close Quarters Tubing Cutter https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000LDGNCU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_Bwa6xbEPZYA49

30 is "better" for the same reason 12 is better than 6 at 40°. You will only get about 2/3 the co2 you are expecting at 15psi
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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: fermenting IPA with spunding valve
« Last post by homoeccentricus on Today at 10:11:36 AM »
Should work fine,  but you want more like 30psi at room temp.

Two inches off the tube is a lot. Start with about an inch and see how that works for you. You should use a tubing cutter for this, not a saw. Tubing cutter will leave a cleaner cut.

Also, your links are identical.

- Thanks, fixed the link.
- Can you point me into the direction of a good cutter that's internationally available?
- 30 psi works with those German spunding valves - they go to 3 bar so should be ok.

[EDIT: oops, meant to ask, why is 30 psi better?]
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Yeast and Fermentation / fermenting IPA with spunding valve
« Last post by Stevie on Today at 09:55:37 AM »
Should work fine,  but you want more like 30psi at room temp.

Two inches off the tube is a lot. Start with about an inch and see how that works for you. You should use a tubing cutter for this, not a saw. Tubing cutter will leave a cleaner cut.

Also, your links are identical.
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Yeast and Fermentation / fermenting IPA with spunding valve
« Last post by homoeccentricus on Today at 09:44:34 AM »
I'm planning to ferment my next brew - an IPA (this time without dry hopping to keep things simple) in a keg (which I'm already doing now) and a spunding valve. Has anyone done this? I understand that spunding valves work well with lagers because fermentation is slower, but may be more difficult with faster fermenting top cropping yeast. The idea would be to ferment the IPA in a keg with a blow-off into a bucket, and after 2 days or so, depending on the speed of the fermentation, close up the keg and add a spunding valve. It may be tricky to determine when it is the right moment to add the valve? Then the pressure should build up to something like 15 psi, correct?

After fermentation is finished, the carbonated beer would be transferred under CO2 pressure to a serving keg. In order for the flocculated yeast not to block the transfer I will use an OUT tube of which two inches or so have been sawed off.

I would get the spunding valve in Germany. Either this one: http://www.malzmuehle.eu/Profi-pressure-relief-system--wall-mountable-Kolonne-pressure-relief-system-Spundhund-and-Kolonne-Keg-manometer-for-home-brewing-Automatic-constant-pressure-relief-valve/beer-brew-beer-beer-accessories-nrw-malt-yeast-hops-homebrewing-automatic-constant-pressure-relief-valve.html

or this one:

Obviously filtering with gelatin or dry-hopping would make things more complicated, but I'm not going to do that for now.

Comments?

[EDIT: fixed link]
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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Kill temp for yeast
« Last post by yso191 on Today at 08:57:24 AM »
It depends on whether the yeast is from Phoenix or the Pacific Northwest.
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