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21
First of all, on a IIPA, regardless of hop varieties used, the moderately high alcohol present carries a subtle sweetness. I don't pick up on this in most standard IPAs (sub 1.065 OG) though. But the newer 'fruity' varieties of hops definitely give a beer a slightly sweet perception to me, though there is obviously no sugar in the hops. When I make a beer using these types of hops (Mandarina, Citra, Mosaic, El Dorado, etc.) I back off a tad on the crystal to account for this. You're not imagining it.
22
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Orval dregs
« Last post by erockrph on Today at 09:22:45 AM »
Below is what Kristen England said about it on the NB forum a few years ago.  The full thread is here: http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=40289&start=15

Fermentation
Orval pitches the Bastogne yeast for primary at about 3million cells/ml wort which lasts about a week or so at quite a cool temperature in 60-62F. They then spin most of the primary yeast out and adds the Brett (B. Brux) in secondary at 1000-5000 cells/ml. It stays in this 'holding' tank for about 3 weeks at 56F. Let the beer stay in the sencondary and then add the dry hops for the final week.

Bottling
The beer is now polished (centrifuged/ 'filtered') which leave it basically clean. They they repitch both yeasts at the same rate they pitched before which will have the following make up:
Main fermentation yeast : 3 millions cells/ml
Brettanomyces : 1.000 to 5.000 cells/ml
Thank you! That is exactly what I was looking for.
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: making a 'double' version of a recipe
« Last post by erockrph on Today at 09:21:40 AM »
two things leap out at me. first, I don't think you need the sugar at 1.080. mash long and low and pitch plenty of yeast into well aearated wort and it'll dry out just fine.

Second, I would consider scaleing down your specialty malts with the batch size so as not go get too roasty/munichy. when I'm 'imperializing' a recipe I bump the base malt and/or sugar to get my target gravity and leave everything else alone.
+1 - I agree with everything here.

I also think that strictly scaling up your BU:GU exactly might end up being a bit too much. If you're doubling your OG, you would end up doubling your IBU's as well. I'm not sure what your original recipe was, but unless you're planning on aging for a long time, 50-60 IBU's for a 1.080 schwarz might be too much. Maybe bump up the IBU's by 50-60% or so.

Not quite 'doubling' here. I think the normal version has 25 IBUs for a BU:GU of 0.46 which would equate to 37 IBUs for a 1.080 beer. That seemed reasonable to me but maybe requires more thought.
37 IBU seems perfectly reasonable for this beer. I was concerned that you might already be at the upper end of the IBU scale and then were going to double that. For the beer you're describing, 37 IBU should be fine.
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: making a 'double' version of a recipe
« Last post by goschman on Today at 09:12:41 AM »
Thanks for all the help and suggestions.

I think I have two solid choices; go the schwarz route or for something slightly more roasty.

I will either go with the original percentages of specialty malts for something slightly roasty (33 SRM):
5% crystal
4.4% biscuit
3.9% carafa
13.3% total

Or scaled down based on only increasing the base malt to reach my OG for something more clean (27 SRM):
3.3% crystal
3% biscuit
2.6% carafa
8.6% total

The remainder of the malt is basically a 60/40 split of pilsner and munich
25
Homebrew Competitions / Re: NHC Final Round Sign Up - Take 2
« Last post by AmandaK on Today at 09:09:28 AM »
Janis/Bruce - is this for trying to get it all done in the morning? Or getting it done in one day?

I assumed (probably incorrectly) that it would run like last year where the beer was done in the morning and mead/cider in the afternoon.
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Dry hopping and perceived sweetness
« Last post by goschman on Today at 09:04:28 AM »
My buddy who loves really hoppy beers always refers to ones that he likes as having a 'sweet hop' flavor. He prefers drier and less malty examples. Sounds kind of like what you are referring to...
27
Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Orval dregs
« Last post by narcout on Today at 09:04:28 AM »
Below is what Kristen England said about it on the NB forum a few years ago.  The full thread is here: http://forum.northernbrewer.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=40289&start=15

Fermentation
Orval pitches the Bastogne yeast for primary at about 3million cells/ml wort which lasts about a week or so at quite a cool temperature in 60-62F. They then spin most of the primary yeast out and adds the Brett (B. Brux) in secondary at 1000-5000 cells/ml. It stays in this 'holding' tank for about 3 weeks at 56F. Let the beer stay in the sencondary and then add the dry hops for the final week.

Bottling
The beer is now polished (centrifuged/ 'filtered') which leave it basically clean. They they repitch both yeasts at the same rate they pitched before which will have the following make up:
Main fermentation yeast : 3 millions cells/ml
Brettanomyces : 1.000 to 5.000 cells/ml
28
General Homebrew Discussion / Dry hopping and perceived sweetness
« Last post by lupulus on Today at 08:54:04 AM »
Hi all,
Sorry to be perceived as beating as dead horse... I brew very dry IPAs and DIPAs. I have Pliny (Elder) clones finishing at 1.008 to 1.009, and I have always perceived a touch of sweetness that I do not perceive in other beers. Because Pliny calls for a Caramel malt (using Caraamber because it is what I get in Munich), I forced myself to keep my mouth shut about this sensation, thinking that this perceived sweetness should be from the Caraamber. And before, you say "oxidation", I bottle condition (or keg condition) IPAs and the only transfer I do, is before fermentation is completely done, so any oxygen during the transfer is theoretically absorbed by the yeast.
So, after a visit to Austin, Texas, I decided to clone Noble King, a dry hopped sour, bought a bottle, grew the culture, Fermented it for two weeks to 1.003, and dry hopped with 75g of Mittelfr├╝h and 75g of Mandarina Bavaria (whole hops) for a 21 liter volume. (I tasted the beer before dry-hopping and noted no sweetness at all.). Finished dry hopping and keg most of the beer with sugar at 5g/L and left it conditioning for 3 months at about 20 Celsius (68F). Chilled the keg two days ago, tapped today, and tasted the beer. It is very good, lemony sour, bretty aromas, dry hop spicy flavors, and SWEETNESS. The sweetness cannot be described as malty, it is very simple, like splenda/ stevia (no sugar coating). So, I checked for gravity to ensure the sugar added for carbonation was consumed, and the beer (degassed) was at 1.002. The important point to keep in mind, is that we are talking about a truckload of dry-hops, so please only comment if you have experience with the "truckload model". So, as Sherlock use to say, "Once you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, no matter how improbable, must be the truth."
Now your turn to shoot me down :-)
29
Kegging and Bottling / Re: Dual Faucet Kegerator Question
« Last post by BrewArk on Today at 08:50:01 AM »
I have a "T" in my set up but when I have an uncarbonated beer that I want to hook up to the system, I'm left with the dilemma of whether or not I want to fuss w/changing my pressure or not.  I'm getting closer to going w/a double regulator so that I can dispense and carbonate at the same time.
30
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: making a 'double' version of a recipe
« Last post by goschman on Today at 08:48:01 AM »
two things leap out at me. first, I don't think you need the sugar at 1.080. mash long and low and pitch plenty of yeast into well aearated wort and it'll dry out just fine.

Second, I would consider scaleing down your specialty malts with the batch size so as not go get too roasty/munichy. when I'm 'imperializing' a recipe I bump the base malt and/or sugar to get my target gravity and leave everything else alone.
+1 - I agree with everything here.

I also think that strictly scaling up your BU:GU exactly might end up being a bit too much. If you're doubling your OG, you would end up doubling your IBU's as well. I'm not sure what your original recipe was, but unless you're planning on aging for a long time, 50-60 IBU's for a 1.080 schwarz might be too much. Maybe bump up the IBU's by 50-60% or so.

Not quite 'doubling' here. I think the normal version has 25 IBUs for a BU:GU of 0.46 which would equate to 37 IBUs for a 1.080 beer. That seemed reasonable to me but maybe requires more thought.
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