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21
All Grain Brewing / Re: Specialty grain %'s when increasing base malt
« Last post by narcout on December 14, 2017, 03:22:32 PM »
^^^^
I think there's a difference here.  You're assuming a given  volume of a preexisting  wort and adding a certain amount of colorant.  This is different, logically, from producing a wort.

In addition to color, doesn't RB also add flavor and fermentable extract?

It's a different example, but I think related to what I posted in reply #23.

**EDIT: As an exercise,  think of your example and substitute Sinamar for RB.  Would you change the dosage?

No, I don't think I would.

I think that last clause may be where you're off.  I think it would contribute as much flavor as sugar, thereby diluting the RB flavor back to the correct proportion.

I see your point, but I can't tell which is correct.

This is a bit of a tangent, but I wonder what the flavor difference would be between two base malt only beers, both with the same OG but produced with differing amounts of malt due to efficiency differences.   
22
All Grain Brewing / Re: Specialty grain %'s when increasing base malt
« Last post by Robert on December 14, 2017, 03:01:44 PM »
^^^^
I think there's a difference here.  You're assuming a given  volume of a preexisting  wort and adding a certain amount of colorant.  This is different, logically, from producing a wort.

**EDIT: As an exercise,  think of your example and substitute Sinamar for RB.  Would you change the dosage?

Also as to Martin's post above, I see that what Jamil advocates ASSUMES that the grain bills scale.  He's trying precisely to alter the balance, not scale an identical recipe.
23
All Grain Brewing / Re: Specialty grain %'s when increasing base malt
« Last post by narcout on December 14, 2017, 02:53:00 PM »
Assume your plan is to collect 7 gallons of 1.050 wort pre-boil and to steep 1 lb. of roasted barley in the wort as it comes up to a boil.

Would you adjust the amount of RB you plan to steep depending on how many lbs. of base malt it takes you to obtain 7 gallons of 1.050 wort (not a rhetorical question)?
24
All Grain Brewing / Re: Specialty grain %'s when increasing base malt
« Last post by mabrungard on December 14, 2017, 02:43:34 PM »
While I adhere to keeping the percentages of ALL the grain bill the same when I need to alter their amount to match my system efficiency, I know that Jamil advocated keeping the specialty grain content constant while varying the base malt content when brewing the various Scottish Ale variants (60, 70, 80). I seem to recall his thinking that the smaller versions would benefit from the increased specialty percentage.
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« Last post by dannyjed on December 14, 2017, 02:41:04 PM »
Killer foam on a 5 year old beer that big.  :o. Or any beer. How is it, Dan?
It held up very nice. It was bottle conditioned and has some oxidized sherry notes, but also has caramel and hop bitterness. I’m proud that it is an enjoyable drinking experience after 5 years. Too bad it was the last one.


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26
All Grain Brewing / Re: Specialty grain %'s when increasing base malt
« Last post by denny on December 14, 2017, 02:36:23 PM »
Below is what I was thinking, but please correct me if I'm off base.

Say you are following a recipe for a stout that calls for 10 lbs. of base malt and 1 lb. of roasted barley (ignoring the other specialty grains to simplify).  Rounding the percentages, that would be roughly 90.9% base malt and 9.1% RB.

On your system, you might 13.2 lbs. of grain instead of 11 lbs. to reach the desired OG.  If you kept the ratios the same, you would use 12 lbs. of base malt and 1.2 lbs. of RB. 

Assume you're brewing no-sparge and your plan is to mash with 7 gallons of strike water plus .1 gallon/lb. to account for absorption.  That would total 8.1 gallons and 8.32 gallons total strike water respectively.  So you'd be using 20% more RB in 2.7% more water, but ending up with the same pre and post-boil volumes. 

Couldn't that increase the overall roast character?  Yes, you're also using 20% more base malt, but the base malt is delivering more fermentable sugars than flavor.

I think that last clause may be where you're off.  I think it would contribute as much flavor as sugar, thereby diluting the RB flavor back to the correct proportion.
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Yeast and Fermentation / Re: Rehydrating dry yeast
« Last post by SiameseMoose on December 14, 2017, 02:34:30 PM »
The story I was was told relates to osmotic pressure. For the cell to achieve an active metabolic state it has to pull a lot of water into itself to restart its cellular functions. In a solution full of sugar, the sugar tends to pull water into the solution, out of the cells. It is therefore harder for the cell to draw water in. Many cells do not survive the hydration step, and it is assumed (maybe been measured) that more cells die when trying to rehydrate in wort.

Of course, when you pitch a rehydrated cell into wort, the osmotic shock will kill some number of cells. Don't ask me which is the healthiest way for the poor yeast cell.
28
All Grain Brewing / Re: Specialty grain %'s when increasing base malt
« Last post by narcout on December 14, 2017, 02:30:19 PM »
Below is what I was thinking, but please correct me if I'm off base.

Say you are following a recipe for a stout that calls for 10 lbs. of base malt and 1 lb. of roasted barley (ignoring the other specialty grains to simplify).  Rounding the percentages, that would be roughly 90.9% base malt and 9.1% RB.

On your system, you might 13.2 lbs. of grain instead of 11 lbs. to reach the desired OG.  If you kept the ratios the same, you would use 12 lbs. of base malt and 1.2 lbs. of RB. 

Assume you're brewing no-sparge and your plan is to mash with 7 gallons of strike water plus .1 gallon/lb. to account for absorption.  That would total 8.1 gallons and 8.32 gallons total strike water respectively.  So you'd be using 20% more RB in 2.7% more water, but ending up with the same pre and post-boil volumes. 

Couldn't that increase the overall roast character?  Yes, you're also using 20% more base malt, but the base malt is delivering more fermentable sugars than flavor.
29
Yeast and Fermentation / Rehydrating dry yeast
« Last post by denny on December 14, 2017, 02:15:26 PM »
Yeah, I know...it's been debated to death.  But I'm not interested in whether or not to rehydrate.  I'm curious if anyone knows the science behind it.  We're told that rehydrating means that you're pitching more viable cells than if you don't.  But why?  What's going on to increase the viability?
30
Ingredients / Re: Help With Winter Lager Ideas
« Last post by Bob357 on December 14, 2017, 01:54:17 PM »
Probably the best way is to make a tincture by soaking the spices in some Vodka.  If you plan on using cloves, be sure too use them whole. The rest of the spices are fine ground. After a week or so, strain it through a coffee filter. When you're ready to package the beer you can dose it gradually to taste in your bottling bucket and not run the risk of adding too much. If you keg, add to the keg.
 
I use a graduated syringe to dose to 4 oz. samples of beer until I get the taste I want, starting with 1/2 cc. Then just extrapolate the amount for the batch.
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