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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: isovaleric acid - sweaty socks
« Last post by brewinhard on Today at 10:41:46 AM »
For the past few years I have been diligent about replacing my plastic equipment (siphon tubing, auto-siphon, and wine thief) once every year. I feel that 30 bucks per year is a good insurance to have peace of mind that I am doing my very best to minimize infections.
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All Grain Brewing / Re: double kolsch attenuation
« Last post by brewinhard on Today at 10:34:43 AM »
I like mine in my stocking please...
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All Grain Brewing / Re: double kolsch attenuation
« Last post by HoosierBrew on Today at 09:25:24 AM »
+2. I think it's a good idea and a good plan to execute it.
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All Grain Brewing / Re: double kolsch attenuation
« Last post by goschman on Today at 09:20:35 AM »
Sounds solid to me as well. 1/2 pound of sugar should help without taking much away from the malt character.

That was kind of my thought. I think it works out 3.6%.
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All Grain Brewing / double kolsch attenuation
« Last post by Stevie on Today at 09:18:50 AM »
Sounds solid to me as well. 1/2 pound of sugar should help without taking much away from the malt character.
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All Grain Brewing / Re: double kolsch attenuation
« Last post by dmtaylor on Today at 09:05:57 AM »
I think your plan will work just perfectly.  Go for it.
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Beer Recipes / Re: recipes for 23C. Oud Bruin
« Last post by reverseapachemaster on Today at 09:05:11 AM »
That's my basic problem:clearly show the difference in recipes. BJCP says "A deeper malt character distinguishes these beers from Flanders red ales. The Oud Bruin is less acetic and maltier than a Flanders Red, and the fruity flavors are more malt-oriented." I'm not too familiar with this style, Flemish red is much more common where I live. So I'll have to do some extensive tasting when I get back from vacation.

I'm not sure the actual recipe distinguishes the styles as much as fermentation drives a difference. Modern Belgian oud bruins are also often just lacto and sacc so they don't dry out as much and more malt sweetness remains to oxidize into sherry-like fruit flavors with time. They tend to be stainless aged rather than oak aged like reds. You can find other unusual processes like Petrus oud bruin which is a blend of a sour pale with a clean brown ale and IMO tastes more like a red than an oud bruin like Goudenband but not quite that sweet-sour of a backsweetened red like Monk's Cafe or Duchess.
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All Grain Brewing / Re: BIAB spent grain
« Last post by dmtaylor on Today at 09:02:41 AM »
Thanks! That helped a lot! That's a great idea using the drippings for a starter, however, how long can this be stored. I usually only brew three or four times a year with my current situation. Can the wort be stored for a few months in the fridge if its sealed well?

Secondly, if I am not worried about haze like with darker beers or wheat beers, should be OK to squeeze just based off of how you explained this right?

Great questions again.  Wort will only keep in the fridge for 2-3 weeks before it begins to go sour all by itself.  Plus it's prone to botulism bacteria if not fermented for a few months -- potentially dangerous.  Freezing it might be a perfect option though.

Sure, if you don't care about haze, then squeeze away.  Would work well for wheat beers.
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: isovaleric acid - sweaty socks
« Last post by blair.streit on Today at 08:59:32 AM »
Dave, do you use iodophor or bleach occassionally for sanitizing? After Mark's illustration that Starsan doesn't work on all spoilers, I've been more open to iodophor use. I'm still leary of using bleach on my plastics and hoses, but it sure is an effective sanitizer. Occassional Hose replacement is probably still a good policy.

I haven't used bleach for many many years.  I agree, it would probably be a good idea to switch sanitizers more often.  This advice applies to all homebrewers of course, not just me or people who are having problems.  Maybe every 5 or 6 batches or so we should be switching it up.  And the hose thing, definitely more often than I've been doing (I think it's been about 5 years now).
I've been considering building a "hose sanitizer" using my sump pump to recirculate iodophor through various diameters of tubing I use for transfers. Ideally, I'd like to find a "stepped barb" so I could just slip the tubing over the end and let it recirc for a few minutes, then switch ends since the end on the barb probably wouldn't get much action.

My goal is not to avoid replacing tubing but to get a few more uses out of it. Right now with all the various tubing I use for racking, keg to keg transfers, etc, I find that I'm constantly throwing away tubing that I've used once or twice because I can't remember the vintage or it just doesn't "look right". I'm probably overly paranoid about this, but given that tubing is difficult to clean, sanitize and dry thoroughly, it seems way too easy to get mold or wild yeast going in there (which are less likely to be killed by StarSan).
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All Grain Brewing / Re: BIAB spent grain
« Last post by Joe Sr. on Today at 08:57:56 AM »
I freeze wort from the last runnings of the sparge.  Defrost, boil, pitch yeast, and there's your starter.

I don't believe that a lower gravity starter is a problem.
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