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31
Ingredients / Re: Best hopping
« Last post by HoosierBrew on Today at 08:48:41 AM »
There's not one right way as much as there are many good ways to create different results with different hops.

I think mid-boil additions work well with the older American hop varieties (in addition to whirlpool additions) but the newer fruitier hops don't seem to gain anything over just unloading them post-boil in whirlpool additions.


Agreed. It also depends on the beer I brew. German lagers get all additions in boil, generally a 60, with a 20 and flameout optional with style. APA and AIPA get a 60 addition and a whirlpool addition. Lots of methods out there to get good results.
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Ingredients / Re: Best hopping
« Last post by reverseapachemaster on Today at 08:36:23 AM »
There's not one right way as much as there are many good ways to create different results with different hops.

I think mid-boil additions work well with the older American hop varieties (in addition to whirlpool additions) but the newer fruitier hops don't seem to gain anything over just unloading them post-boil in whirlpool additions.
33
Ingredients / Re: Pilsner Mail for an IPA?
« Last post by erockrph on Today at 07:35:07 AM »
Hey everyone,

new member here, but not really new to homebrewing.  I've been brewing for about 4 years now, now on all grain but have just recently moved onto building my own recipes.

A friend of mine who owns a bakery recently went to his grain supplier (who also supplies grains to some breweries in the PNW) and got about 10 lbs of Pilsner malt, and 10 lbs of white wheat malt.

I'm not a huge Hef fan, but figured I could at least use the Pilsner malt for something.  Can I use pilsner malt for an IPA?  I'm assuming I may need to add some other grains to build the body a bit, but wanted to see if anyone had some feedback on that.

Or if you have a suggestion on what to use both of those grains on, other than a Hef I'm totally open to suggestions.  Thanks!

I've done SMaSH IPAs with Pils malt several times. I tend to go back and forth between American 2 Row and Pils for pretty much any IPA anyway. Current trend is for little, if any, malt character anyway. I have a beer that I did with a commercial brewery that was 80/20 Pils/rice for the grist. Really light, dry, and easy drinking.

I have used a little rice in some IPAs, and I like the results. Maybe 10% for me.
Interesting. I've been using corn quite a bit lately, but I wasn't a huge fan of it in the IPA's I've tried it in. I may have to experiment with rice sometime soon.
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Ingredients / Re: Pilsner Mail for an IPA?
« Last post by hopfenundmalz on Today at 06:59:06 AM »
Hey everyone,

new member here, but not really new to homebrewing.  I've been brewing for about 4 years now, now on all grain but have just recently moved onto building my own recipes.

A friend of mine who owns a bakery recently went to his grain supplier (who also supplies grains to some breweries in the PNW) and got about 10 lbs of Pilsner malt, and 10 lbs of white wheat malt.

I'm not a huge Hef fan, but figured I could at least use the Pilsner malt for something.  Can I use pilsner malt for an IPA?  I'm assuming I may need to add some other grains to build the body a bit, but wanted to see if anyone had some feedback on that.

Or if you have a suggestion on what to use both of those grains on, other than a Hef I'm totally open to suggestions.  Thanks!

I've done SMaSH IPAs with Pils malt several times. I tend to go back and forth between American 2 Row and Pils for pretty much any IPA anyway. Current trend is for little, if any, malt character anyway. I have a beer that I did with a commercial brewery that was 80/20 Pils/rice for the grist. Really light, dry, and easy drinking.

I have used a little rice in some IPAs, and I like the results. Maybe 10% for me.
35
The Pub / Re: Product Development, Homebrewing, and Keurig
« Last post by HoosierBrew on Today at 06:55:05 AM »
Keurig is just pure idiocy IMO. My mom bought me one years ago and after I used the initial pods I strictly used it for hot water until it died. OTOH I actually like to drink GOOD coffee so there's that.



Couldn't agree more, Keith. The Keurig trades ease of use (I guess) for subpar s**t coffee IMO. We have one at work and every single pod has that bitter instant coffee bite, even with creamer. Once you get used to really good coffee, that crap's unacceptable. And the pods are overly expensive to boot. Each his own.
36
Dang I'm ready to sell! lol
37
The Pub / Re: Product Development, Homebrewing, and Keurig
« Last post by majorvices on Today at 06:38:16 AM »
I have a Zymatic and it is a lot of fun but, after dozens of batches I can attest I really feel I make better beer on my old 12 gallon homebrew system. I can't understand the sense in "pico paks" unless you are just very rich and don't know what to do with your money.

Keurig is just pure idiocy IMO. My mom bought me one years ago and after I used the initial pods I strictly used it for hot water until it died. OTOH I actually like to drink GOOD coffee so there's that.
38
Beer Travel / Re: Where am I?
« Last post by HoosierBrew on Today at 06:18:05 AM »
Awesome. Silly question - can you buy malt by the bag there, or do you need to buy from a shop or wholesaler?
39
Beer Recipes / Re: Red Ale with Apple Pie extract recipe
« Last post by HoosierBrew on Today at 06:14:54 AM »
I think it all depends on how malty you want it. Red x has worked well for me to get deep red tones but in my experience anything at 50% of the grist or more will contribute to a pretty uniquely malty beer. I think carared and a small amount of roasted malt may be the way to go.

I agree with this. Red X is the only way to get a true red color from grain alone, but it has a deep maltiness that only fits a handful of styles. The color and flavor are both distinct and are married together. Red X is a one-trick pony that works exceptionally well withing a rather narrow flavor spectrum.

Unless you're looking for a serious malt bomb, then CaraRed and some roast barley are probably better suited to a broader variety of styles. I'm thinking you'd want a rather neutral base recipe to let the flavoring show through. Something like an Irish Red Ale for a base style would be pretty good, I think.


I agree, too. I like Red X in principle, but just can't find many beers where I want to use a large amount of it. High sulfate levels do help offset some of the 'malt bomb' character when using it in high %.
40
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pics of recent brews?
« Last post by HoosierBrew on Today at 05:44:45 AM »
Brown ale. Clarified and lagered for a week. Darker not in the light.




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Looks awesome!
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