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61
Beer Recipes / Re: Which ale yeast for an english mild?
« Last post by deadpoetic0077 on Today at 07:13:00 AM »
I ended up going with 4oz chocolate, 4 oz c60, 2 oz RB. the yeast they had was 13 so I went with that as well. I will post back to let you guys know how it turns out!
62
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« Last post by pete b on Today at 07:05:37 AM »
Sounds like MoreBeer is probably your best bet, Pete, since it's in PA. And you probably won't find used 2.5 gallon kegs, but the new ones at Adventures in Homebrewing are fantastic. I have 3 of them. You can generally get them for $75 each, which is very reasonable for new kegs.
That is a better price than I Have seen for 2.5 gallons. Why are these particular kegs fantastic?
They're ISO 9001 certified and NSF approved, they're good quality. They're $79 on AiH right now, but if you time it right, you can get them for $69 each. I timed it bad this last time I bought some, which was Black Friday when they were $69 (I had ordered 2 on the Monday before Black Friday, D'oh!).
I missed the boat. They are $119 now. This is something frustrating about homebrew stores online, for bigger items you need to watch for deals or pay way more. I don't have anything in a fermenter now so I'll weigh it out.
63
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Last post by The Beerery on Today at 06:56:33 AM »
Hah, you continue to prove you didn't even click on the link. That link is FULL of research papers and brewing literature.
After you get done ACTUALLY clicking the link to find the answers you seek. Call bsg and tell them they are selling bunk products to professional brewers.


Taken directly from my grain room.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Well, doesn't BSG sell pH stabilizer 5.2? That is a bunk product.  :P

But, that aside, we're using the NaMeta in a mash pH range of 5.1-5.4 for the bulk of its protection anyway. The other protection is kegging with extract left and naturally carbonating. So whether NaMeta is effective in the pH range of 4-4.5 is a moot point. Is it not?

Yes and no, the yeast themselves are going to produce suflites. So while WE don't use sulfites for this, many pro brewers do( filtering, force carbonation, bottling, and oxidation though bottle caps). But back to the topic of sulfites, if pH was the case then the sulfites produced from the yeast wouldn't matter, and wouldn't work....But this is far from the case, and easily googleable.

For instance....
http://www.suntory.com/sic/research/t_genome/detail_02.html
64
The Pub / Re: Whiskey
« Last post by MDixon on Today at 06:52:14 AM »
Whistlepig = MWGP as do most Rye's.

I was in a bar in Baltimore last night and they had a bottle of "local" Sagamore rye so I took a glass. Sure enough when I looked it up it was Midwest Grain Products. Tasty stuff, but not from Baltimore. ;)
65
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Last post by The Beerery on Today at 06:51:48 AM »
Let's calm down a bit.  Remember, we are all brothers and sisters of the brewing community.  We don't need to be calling each other names. Claiming someone is ignorant is unfair, as in most scientific fields, one can find studies that confirm multiple hypotheses.  Things stated here are not always scientific laws, just the latest findings that may change either way with further research .  Also, much of the research regarding hot-side oxidation aren't readily available to homebrewers- and even then- the texts cost hundreds of dollars, so the claim of ignorance isn't necessary.  How can one ignore something that isn't readily available to make the person aware of it in the first place?  For me it is frustrating that sources on the effects of HSO-or other brewing science-isn't easily accessible.  That's the bad thing about science done by people  concerned about profit or industry and not public education.

As far as post fermentation oxidation,  I think pro and amateur brewers acknowledge that is real so we don't even need to argue about that. Most of us have experienced bad canning or a bottle that have been on the shelf for too long and that research is easily accessible.

Finally, what one considers the superior style is irrelevant as we all have our personal preferences. I used to love the west-coast IPA, got burned out and started drinking and appreciating a good helles.  Now after brewing a wedding IPA for my lovely wife and spending a nice honeymoon in SoCal, I can't get enough west-coast IPA.  As my Dad always says, "Opinions are like a$$holes.  Everybody has one and they all stink."  Just RDWHAHB and enjoy your helles or IPA or mild or whatever and enjoy the discussion.

EDIT:  Bryan, I wasn't trying to pick on you for claiming someone is ignorant. Anyone following these discussions knows you've taken your share of unnecessary flak.  I appreciate the perspective you have to offer as well as the perspectives of everyone on here.

I called him ignorant because I provided a link with all the necessary information he requested, but refused to simply click on the link and look. It doesn't get easier than that.
66
All Grain Brewing / Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Last post by Big Monk on Today at 06:25:02 AM »
5 ppm of NaMeta will protect against 1 ppm of O2, leaving behind a certain amount of Na and SO4 in the process.

It doesn't have to be anymore complicated than that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
67
All Grain Brewing / Re: Introduction to Low Oxygen Brewing
« Last post by dilluh98 on Today at 06:13:18 AM »
At final beer pH (let's say 3.8-4.4 to be generous), much of the SO2 will be in the form of bisulfite (HSO3-) via the equilibrium of SO2 + H2O <--> HSO3- + H+. The lower end of that pH range will have more of the SO2 form and the higher end of that range will be predominantly HSO3-. The important point here though is that this is an equilibrium (double headed arrows) and thus HSO3- can be thought of as a reserve for SO2. As the SO2 is consumed the equilibrium will produce more of it from HSO3-. Some algebraic manipulation of simple acid-dissociation reaction equations yields:

[SO2"available"]/[SO3-2] = 1 + 10^(7.2 - pH).

At pH 4.5 this would give a ratio of ~ 500:1 of "available" SO2 : sulfite (SO3-2).


Bisulfite itself (HSO3-) is also an antioxidant, I think.
68
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Online Home Brew Stores
« Last post by hopfenundmalz on Today at 05:56:24 AM »
Sounds like MoreBeer is probably your best bet, Pete, since it's in PA. And you probably won't find used 2.5 gallon kegs, but the new ones at Adventures in Homebrewing are fantastic. I have 3 of them. You can generally get them for $75 each, which is very reasonable for new kegs.
That is a better price than I Have seen for 2.5 gallons. Why are these particular kegs fantastic?
They're ISO 9001 certified and NSF approved, they're good quality. They're $79 on AiH right now, but if you time it right, you can get them for $69 each. I timed it bad this last time I bought some, which was Black Friday when they were $69 (I had ordered 2 on the Monday before Black Friday, D'oh!).
+1 to all this. I have several of the 2.5 gallon kegs. I've gotten them from both AiH and AHS (appears to be same brand at both stores), and they have all been great out of the box. I've also gotten a few of the same ones in 5 gallons to use as my fermentation kegs.

And AFAIC, I don't know why anyone would buy used kegs any more. You can get new ones on sale for within 5 bucks of what you'd pay for used ones. Seems like a no-brainer to me.
Yes those are the same kegs. AiH bought AHS about 2 years ago. The guy who had AHS started a brewery, and sold the Homebrew shop.
69
General Homebrew Discussion / Re: Pale Lager off flavors
« Last post by JJeffers09 on Today at 05:53:13 AM »
It isn't Mercaptan is it. or the 3 methyl 2 butene thiol?a sulfuric, putrid, skunky aroma, typically due to a reaction between hops’ alpha acids and sulfur compounds in the presence of sunlight or electric light.

Or is it moldy, musty, and cheesy from oxidation?  Either one is from Alpha acids and Sulphur reacting to light or oxygen.  Its not sitting in the light is it, transferring from keg to keg outside? Or fermented with the light left on?
70
The Pub / Re: Whiskey
« Last post by JJeffers09 on Today at 05:44:10 AM »
I have always found it to be 'sweet oak' fresh wood flavors vs sugary sweet.  I am not sure I follow the politics but it will give me something to google... ;)

I will agree with you Redbreast is sweet, sugary sweet.  Not the neat kind of whiskey, its a car bomb whiskey.  Kilbeggan is high for most but the 21YO blend is pretty awesome.  The ex-Bourbon Barrel is the only negative I have picked up, but it is still an ever changing bottle.  Funny thing about the Kilbeggan single malt 8y that I found funny anyway, the main ingredient is corn.  Which to me isn't irish whiskey, but I am not against it I just don't call it "Irish Whiskey" its Irish Bourbon.  I will agree it is sweeter than a bourbon, but still good.

Whistle Pig is one of the only ryes (straight up rye) I will order neat.  Everything else is better in a cocktail for my tastes anyway.
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