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91
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« Last post by Big Monk on July 19, 2018, 12:30:53 PM »
^^^^
Helles just means "pale."  Stout just means "big."  Taken at face value, as the terms were originally intended, there's nothing controversial about either of those examples.  Style police need to chillax.  With a stout, Helles, hoppy, hazy ale maybe. 8)

I disagree and here's why: Frankenstein.

I had to explain to my son last night the confusion over the name Frankenstein. Frankenstein is the doctor, not the creature. Except that in nearly every culture aware of the story, Frankenstein is the creature. It has taken root to the point where going back to calling him "The creature" just seems at odds with pop culture.

Is it right to invoke Helles meaning "pale"? Yes. Grammatically and technically, yes. Can we go back to a time where a Helles is any pale beer under the sun? Not likely. I think styles guidelines are mostly nonsense. Yet, Helles is a distinct beer in flavor and appearance from a Pils, or an Export, or a Kolsch, or a Festbier. And they are all pale.

The Brulosophy thing was a joke on my part. They can call whatever they want whatever they'd like. I think there are clear differences between beers of different styles that share some commonalities, and in that regard, style guidelines make perfect sense.

92
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« Last post by Robert on July 19, 2018, 11:40:12 AM »
^^^^
Helles just means "pale."  Stout just means "big."  Taken at face value, as the terms were originally intended, there's nothing controversial about either of those examples.  Style police need to chillax.  With a stout, Helles, hoppy, hazy ale maybe. 8)
93
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« Last post by Big Monk on July 19, 2018, 10:02:12 AM »
I have brewed this , it doesn't follow tradition lagering technique but it makes a very enjoyable Helles. I use 029 in the first batch and 34/70 in the second and fermented at 66 degrees ramping at the finish to 72. http://brulosophy.com/recipes/munich-helles/

More on warm fermenting lagers http://brulosophy.com/2017/02/20/yeast-pitch-temperature-pt-2-cool-vs-warm-in-a-lager-exbeeriment-results/

Calling the Brulosphy Helles a Helles is fightin’ words!

What was it about it that you didn't like?  That made it "not a helles"?

It was a joke. A comical throwback to a odd time in our collective forum existence.
That's how I took it. I mean it was obviously a joke, because calling brülosophy helles "not a helles" is like... ludicrous. Duh, they use an ümlat. How much more aüthentic can one be?

The real funny part is that if they had just called it a Kolsch, which is basically what it is, they never would have gotten any criticism. However, in a day and age when a man or woman can I identify as a dog and/or cat, they can call it whatever they like.

Time to market my 100% Pilsner malt cold fermented Stout. 😜
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All Grain Brewing / Re: Double Mash
« Last post by klickitat jim on July 19, 2018, 09:21:55 AM »
Bueller... Bueller...

Brewed January
Shipped March, I think...

Now the challenge is on my bottling sanitation more than anything. Especially the one I sent to Drew, which bounced around the California coast for about ten days before it arrived.

95
Beer Recipes / Re: Helles lager recipe suggestions
« Last post by klickitat jim on July 19, 2018, 06:58:46 AM »
I have brewed this , it doesn't follow tradition lagering technique but it makes a very enjoyable Helles. I use 029 in the first batch and 34/70 in the second and fermented at 66 degrees ramping at the finish to 72. http://brulosophy.com/recipes/munich-helles/

More on warm fermenting lagers http://brulosophy.com/2017/02/20/yeast-pitch-temperature-pt-2-cool-vs-warm-in-a-lager-exbeeriment-results/

Calling the Brulosphy Helles a Helles is fightin’ words!

What was it about it that you didn't like?  That made it "not a helles"?

It was a joke. A comical throwback to a odd time in our collective forum existence.
That's how I took it. I mean it was obviously a joke, because calling brülosophy helles "not a helles" is like... ludicrous. Duh, they use an ümlat. How much more aüthentic can one be?
96
All Grain Brewing / Re: efficiency
« Last post by Robert on July 19, 2018, 03:08:27 AM »
This is just one data point, but I found my efficiency dropped when my mill gap slipped a couple years ago.  I thought it was the grain, initially, but checked the gap with feelers and there was the culprit.  I grind around .025 gap and condition the grain, also, as I like the greater intact husk results I get with conditioning.  BIAB with HERMS recirc and Hochkurz step mash as the process for most of my beers (lagers).

Undamaged husks, finer grind, and recirc is where’s it’s at. Clear wort, smooth lautering and great efficiency.
Something I've noticed lately trying a lot of different malts, local and not.  With the same mill gap and the same rpm,  some malts give nearly intact husks (recent examples for me, Simpson's and a local product) and others noticeably more fragmented husks (e.g. Rahr and even Weyermann.)  It would seem some combination of barley variety and processing contribute to the quality of milled malt, and I'd like to see more study on this.  Note that each category in my above examples includes a high protein domestic and a low protein European representative.
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All Grain Brewing / Re: efficiency
« Last post by Big Monk on July 19, 2018, 02:37:07 AM »
This is just one data point, but I found my efficiency dropped when my mill gap slipped a couple years ago.  I thought it was the grain, initially, but checked the gap with feelers and there was the culprit.  I grind around .025 gap and condition the grain, also, as I like the greater intact husk results I get with conditioning.  BIAB with HERMS recirc and Hochkurz step mash as the process for most of my beers (lagers).

Undamaged husks, finer grind, and recirc is where’s it’s at. Clear wort, smooth lautering and great efficiency.
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Other Fermentables / Re: Butterbeer anyone?
« Last post by Michael Thompson on July 19, 2018, 02:29:13 AM »
I suppose you could make regular beer but play around with different English ale yeasts and perhaps even German lager yeasts and purposely TRY to get a beer with a ton of diacetyl in it.  Ferment too cold, secondary early like after the first 3 or 4 days of fermentation, etc.  This should get you a relatively buttery beer if all the conditions are right, and if you used a yeast strain that is prone to it.

OK, now I've been to Harry Potter World myself and had butterbeer, so I'm reviving this thread. Please think about all the stuff you avoid to eliminate diacetyl, and give me to opposite advice. I think I need to drive diacetyl through the roof to accomplish this. What malt/yeast/techniques will produce the most diacetyl?

Sounds like 1st, short, cold fermentation. What yeast? I've seen recommendations of Irish ale yeast, English ale yeast, and perhaps German lager yeast. Would I lager it, or brew ale with the lager yeast? Any hints appreciated.
99
All Grain Brewing / Re: Plum beer?
« Last post by charlie on July 19, 2018, 01:27:59 AM »

I've made plum melomel that is very close to the japanese style plum wine in the stores.

I've always had more than 4# but with the honey it shouldn't be bad.

Honey? Melomel???

You hit the target right in the clout!

I thought I was going to be able to get more figs from my friend's mother, but the tree rats ate them while she was at the lake. Tree Rats!

Spiking the other split with the 4 lbs of plums and a couple of pounds of honey appeals to me. Game on!

Charlie
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General Homebrew Discussion / Re: What kettle is best for a new brewer
« Last post by charlie on July 19, 2018, 01:18:33 AM »
How fast would 5 gallons go and how many drinking i got a few friends but not all of I feel like 5 would be a lot

5 Gallons is approx 53 bottles of brew. In the real world you'll get more like 48 or 50. So if you and your buddies drink 10 bottles per night it will last 5 days.

That's why I upgraded to keggles. I like my beer better than almost anything I can buy, and I didn't want to have to brew every weekend. So I brew a 10 gal batch every other week, and have a small surplus to carry over when the next brew comes on-line.

Charlie
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