Author Topic: PA Dutch  (Read 4546 times)

Offline capozzoli

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #45 on: October 10, 2010, 07:32:13 PM »
Tom,sounds like masala kraut.  ;D

I dont measure the salt I just make sure the shredded kraut is well coated my mixing in a tub before packing into the crock. Never had any problems yet.

I never had to add water either, If you are short on juice something else is wrong.

The most important thing is that you get a brine when you compress it. The cabbage has to be covered with the juice.

The spices I use leave very little flavor, but I like it. It is a certain "pickle" note.

One thing I do is take the outer green leaves and back them on top of the grated cabbage. This creates another layer to protect the kraut below.

Another tip is to consider taking some of the nice outer leaves then pack them at the bottom of the kraut. This way you will end up with whole sauerkraut leaves for stuffing. Make some Romanian style stuffed kraut.

Also try deep fried sauerkraut it is fantastic.

« Last Edit: October 10, 2010, 07:40:47 PM by capozzoli »
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #46 on: October 10, 2010, 07:56:44 PM »
It does sound a bit like masala kraut. :)

I think the thing that's "wrong" is there just isn't that much cabbage for the diameter of the bucket.  If it was narrower or if I used more cabbage there would be plenty of juice, but the bucket is 9.5 inches across and the cabbage is only 3 inches deep.  I don't need to add much, there's about 3/4 inch of liquid over the cabbage and I'd like it to be more than an inch (just based on stuff I've read).
Tom Schmidlin

Offline MrNate

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #47 on: October 15, 2010, 08:38:12 AM »
Sounds like the same way they make Tabasco sauce, which I failed miserably at a couple of years ago. I didn't quite understand the whole brine/scum thing.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #48 on: October 15, 2010, 09:16:32 AM »
I've made a quick lactic fermented hot sauce before.  I used jalapenos, and it had a little vinegar and salt added pre-ferment.  Ground it all up and put it in a jar.  I let it sit for three days on top of the fridge and a little layer formed that I stirred into the sauce, then I put it in the fridge.  It was excellent.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline MrNate

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #49 on: October 15, 2010, 09:25:39 AM »
Yeah, mine didn't end up with "a little layer." It ended up with a layer of mold that was on the verge of evolving sentience, electing a government, and plotting a crusade.

I used a similar technique, though. Next time I'm going with the "weighted down in a crock" method.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #50 on: October 15, 2010, 09:28:50 AM »
My father's side of the family are Pennsylvania Dutch (German).  There are many recipes I could post.

Here's one of my favorites.

WHOOPIE PIES
MAKES 3 DOZEN COOKIES

Cookies
3-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1-1/2 cups unsweetened cocoa powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened to room temperature
2 cups granulated sugar
2 large eggs
2 cups buttermilk (see notes below)
2 teaspoons vanilla


Seven Minute Cream Filling

2 large egg whites
1-1/2 cups granulated sugar
Pinch of salt
1 teaspoon light corn syrup
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
5 tablespoons cold water
1 teaspoon vanilla

For the cookies: Preheat oven to 400° F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper. Into a large bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa, salt, baking soda, and baking powder. In another large bowl, cream the butter and sugar with an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, buttermilk and vanilla; beat until well-combined. Gradually add the dry ingredients, mixing after each addition until combined. Drop batter onto sheets by heaping tablespoons, about 3 inches apart, as they will spread. (I use a small scoop that is about a one tablespoon capacity. It makes dropping the batter much easier and more uniform.) Bake for about 12 minutes, or until the tops of the cookies spring back to the touch. Let cool slightly before removing to a cooling rack topped with parchment or waxed paper. Let cool completely. Meanwhile, make the filling.

For the filling: Place the eggs, sugar, salt, corn syrup, cream of tartar and cold water in a medium heatproof bowl or the top of a double boiler. Beat with a handheld electric mixer just until combined. Place the bowl over a pot of boiling water, being very careful to make certain that the bottom of the bowl is not touching the water. Beat with the mixer on high speed for 7 minutes. Remove from the pan and add the vanilla. Beat again until combined. To speed up the cooling process, place the bowl in a larger bowl of ice and water. Continue to beat until the filling is thick and cool.

To assemble: Spread cooled filling, about 1-1/2 tablespoons per cookie, on the bottom of half of the cookies. Top each with the remaining cookies. Sandwiches may be served immediately. If storing, wrap individually with plastic wrap or waxed paper, then place in storage bags. Store in the refrigerator for several days, or freeze in freezer bags for several months.

Here's an image I found on the internet but looks exactly like the kind my grandmother used to make when we were kids.



I will make some and post pics some day.  :)
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Offline chumley

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #51 on: October 18, 2010, 02:48:12 PM »
Whoopie Pies?  That image has singing Southern Culture on the Skids' "Camel Walk".........

"Little Debbie, Little Debbie...."

Offline euge

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #52 on: October 19, 2010, 10:54:30 AM »
Or Moon pies...

But that's a Southern thing (I think).
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Offline dak0415

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #53 on: October 19, 2010, 11:37:40 AM »
Nah! Moon pies are graham cracker-like covered in chocolate, best consumed with RC Cola!
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Offline MrNate

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #54 on: October 19, 2010, 12:04:37 PM »
Or Moon pies...

But that's a Southern thing (I think).

Those appalacians run farther north than most people think...
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #55 on: October 19, 2010, 02:26:23 PM »
Looks like a Devil Dog to me.
Beer, its whats for dinner.

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Offline bluesman

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #56 on: October 19, 2010, 02:32:09 PM »
A little history I found on the web...

A whoopie pie is like a sandwich, but made with two soft cookies with a fluffy white filling. Traditional whoopies pies are made with vegetable shortening, not butter. The original and most commonly made whoopie pie is chocolate. but cooks like to experiment, and today pumpkin whoopie pies are a favorite seasonal variation.

The recipe for whoopie pies has its origins with the Amish, and in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, it is not uncommon to find roadside farm stands offering these desserts. Amish cooking is about old recipes that have fed families for generations, with no trendy or cross-cultural fusions or mixtures. These cake-like whoopie pies were considered a special treat because they were originally made from leftover batter. According to Amish legend, when children would find these treats in their lunch bags, they would shout "Whoopie!"

Main's earliest claim is from the Labadie's Bakery in Lewiston, Massachusetts. They first started selling Whoopie Pies in 1925 with the opening of their bakery. The Labadie's Bakery remains in the same location today.

The Berwick Cake Company of Roxbury, Massachusetts, also manufactured “Whoopee pies” since at least 1931. Some think that Berwick’s pies actually date to 1927. Berwick closed its Roxbury plant in 1977.

Ron Price

Offline MrNate

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Re: PA Dutch
« Reply #57 on: November 22, 2011, 11:44:22 PM »
I recently was informed that the secret to my grandma's scrapple was that she used short ribs.
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