Author Topic: First All grain batch  (Read 1560 times)

Offline jdoss03

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First All grain batch
« on: November 29, 2011, 09:57:05 AM »
I'm getting ready to make my first all grain batch in a few weeks, and I was thinking of trying to make a Black Rye Pale ale, more than likely from tweaking the Terrapin Rye clone, but I was curious as to how I should adjust the grain bill. Any suggestions?

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2011, 11:23:30 AM »
Not familiar with that recipe. can you post it?
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Offline tomsawyer

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2011, 11:39:24 AM »
Not familiar with the recipe but I would caution you that rye makes the first runnings fairly viscous, be prepared for the mash to take awhile to run off completely.
Lennie
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Offline micsager

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 11:54:58 AM »
I would suggest something more common for first batch.  Convert one of your extract recipes.  That way, you'll know more about your process, than trying to figure on a new style. 

Offline ckpash88

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 12:09:45 PM »
I would go with something simple that you have done befor so you have an idea of what it will turn out like. You will be able to compare your all grain to extract bc of past experience.

Also, go with something with a simple grain bill.
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Offline euge

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 12:11:54 PM »
I would suggest something more common for first batch.  Convert one of your extract recipes.  That way, you'll know more about your process, than trying to figure on a new style. 

Sound advice and what I was thinking as well, but I was thinking a basic recipe. Nothing fancy- just something to familiarize oneself  with the process. Not an expensive beer that could be ruined by coming in too low or too high.

Look into your water profile. Martin's spreadsheet would be a good place to start. Would suck to have everything go right process-wise and have a lackluster beer because the bill didn't fit the water-type.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline davidgzach

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2011, 02:25:09 PM »
I would suggest something more common for first batch.  Convert one of your extract recipes.  That way, you'll know more about your process, than trying to figure on a new style. 

Sound advice and what I was thinking as well, but I was thinking a basic recipe. Nothing fancy- just something to familiarize oneself  with the process. Not an expensive beer that could be ruined by coming in too low or too high.

Look into your water profile. Martin's spreadsheet would be a good place to start. Would suck to have everything go right process-wise and have a lackluster beer because the bill didn't fit the water-type.
+1 to both of these comments.  Make something relatively simple for your first AG beer.  Use 9-10# of 2 row, 1# crystal and make a Pale Ale or Steam Beer.  Get the process down, know your equipment and then ramp it up.  You want your first brew to be as good as possible not only for yourself but so you can brag about making it!
Dave Zach

Offline jdoss03

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2011, 02:59:01 PM »
Awesome. Thanks for the advice. As far as the water is concerned, I was going to use a few 4 gal jugs of spring water bought at a Sam's Club. The tap water in my area is pretty crappy. Think that will be ok?

Offline jdoss03

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2011, 03:08:18 PM »
Here's the grain bill for Terrapin's Rye Pale Ale (or the clone). It's a good beer if you've never had it. Just figured I'd go ahead and post it.




Batch Size (Gal):   6.00
Wort Size (Gal):   6.60
Total Grain (Lbs):   13.00
Original Gravity   1.057   Final Gravity   1.012
Color SRM: 7.4   
IBU: 29.6   Brewhouse Efficiency: 75%
Wort Boil Time: 60 Minutes
GRAIN BILL
% WEIGHT   AMOUNT (LBS)   INGREDIENT   ORIGIN   POTENTIAL GRAVITY   SRM (°L)
69.2   9.00   American Pale Malt (2-row)   USA   1.036   2
9.6   1.25   Munich Malt(2-Row)   USA   1.035   6
9.6   1.25   Rye Malt   USA   1.030   4
7.7   1.00   Vienna Malt   America   1.034   25
3.8   0.50   Honey Malt   America   1.030   18
HOPS
AMOUNT (OZ.)   NAME   FORM   ALPHA %   IBU   BOIL TIME
0.75 oz.   Magnum Hops   Pellet   14.0   22.1   60 min.
0.75 oz.   Fuggle Hops   Pellet   4.75   7.2   30 min.
0.50 oz.   East Kent Goldings Hops   Pellet   4.75   3.2   20 min.
0.50 oz.   East Kent Goldings Hops   Pellet   4.75   1.9   10 min.
0.50 oz.   East Kent Goldings Hops   Pellet   4.75   3.1   3 min.
2.00 oz.   Cascade Hops   Pellet   5.75   0.0   0 min.
2.00 oz.   Amarillo Hops   Pellet   10.00   0.0   Dry Hop
YEAST
2 packs – Wyeast 1056, American/Chico Ale Yeast
MASHING THE RYE AND GRAINS
Mash at 154° for 60 to 90 min.
Sparge
Cool to 66-70°F and pitch yeast
NOTES
Primary Fermentation 7 days
Secondary Fermentation 14 days
Bottle / Keg Conditioning (Carbonation) 7 days

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2011, 04:29:07 PM »
It's not that complicated a recipe. I think it's a good idea to keep it simple at first but if you want to brew that recipe go for it. worst case scenerio it turns out aweful.

One point on the recipe is it appears to ommit any boiling of the wort going directly from lautering to cooling and pitching the yeast. I would not recommend that unless you want a very sour beer.
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Offline ckpash88

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2011, 04:30:23 PM »
I just did APA made with
9# two row
1# c80

Then
.5 oz horizon 60 min
1 oz fuggles 30 min
1oz cascade 5 min

Pretty easy pretty good
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Offline jdoss03

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #11 on: November 29, 2011, 04:41:33 PM »
It's not that complicated a recipe. I think it's a good idea to keep it simple at first but if you want to brew that recipe go for it. worst case scenerio it turns out aweful.

One point on the recipe is it appears to ommit any boiling of the wort going directly from lautering to cooling and pitching the yeast. I would not recommend that unless you want a very sour beer.

It has a 60 min. Wort Boil time, it's just printed at the top. Its a little out of place

Offline euge

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Re: First All grain batch
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2011, 10:05:47 PM »
As far as the water goes look to see what type it is. Spring, RO, purified or distilled.

If it is Spring then you can probably use it straight for that recipe. If it is any of the other three then you might need to cut it 50/50 with your tap water.

Also if you don't have any campden tablets to remove the chlorine then you should leave the water sitting put overnight in the kettle so that the chlorine can dissipate out of the solution.

If you bought water jugs they might have a website with the water properties listed. This isn't so important in extract brewing but critical when brewing with grain.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman