Author Topic: Hefeweizen techniques  (Read 2853 times)

Offline midtex

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Re: Hefeweizen techniques
« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2010, 06:36:48 PM »
Great information - thank you all!

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Re: Hefeweizen techniques
« Reply #16 on: January 21, 2010, 05:45:50 AM »
Since it was only lightly brushed over I will emphasize fermentation temp. Keep it low. I like to start  mine out around 58-60 degrees and keep it round 62 for a few days then slowly ramp it up to around 64-66 to finish. A lot of misconception is out there that these things are best when fermented warm - even though there are a few breweries in Germany who do ferment in the low 70s I have never had one that turned out with the proper balance brewed at home (maybe we don't have the proper strain - I dunno.)

Mash fairly low, 150-152 and keep the hops low and with a bittering addition only if you want to keep it traditional. Drink it young, no secondary, no aging. Just carb up and drink ASAP.
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Offline nyakavt

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Re: Hefeweizen techniques
« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2010, 06:19:12 AM »
I'll second (or third) the low fermentation temps.  I tried this last month for my first true Hefeweizen and fermented at 62.  This beer turned out most excellent, very drinkable and a subtle hint of spice from the yeast.  When I was still a n00b I tried fermenting a dunkelweizen in the upper 70's.  Yeah, guess how that turned out.

Offline bluesman

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Re: Hefeweizen techniques
« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2010, 07:53:59 AM »
Fermenting low especially because of the decreased amount of yeast. You don't want to burn those yeaties out. You want them to work hard without getting overheated and producing excessive off-flavors.
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Offline midtex

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Re: Hefeweizen techniques
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2010, 10:40:20 AM »
About priming.......... I read the online vesion of How to Brew by John Palmer last night and he mentions the need to occasionally add more yeast at priming - typically for lagers that have been fermentng for months at low temps. If I ferment my hefeweizen at low to mid 60's with reduced yeast (Wyeast 3068, btw), does anyone see the need for additional yeast at bottling? I just want to ensure adequate and substantial carbonation. I am reading that 3.3-4.5 units of CO2 is typical for hefeweizen. Doe anyone know the safe limit of carbonation for 12oz glass bottles?  ???

Offline redbeerman

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Re: Hefeweizen techniques
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2010, 10:50:44 AM »
You will not need to add yeast and the standard brown beer bottles I've gone above 3.5 without explosions, but I would try to stay below 4.  I've had caps dome, but the bottles did not break and that was above 4 volumes.
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Re: Hefeweizen techniques
« Reply #21 on: January 21, 2010, 11:05:32 AM »
Fermenting at cool temps is not the same as lagering at cold temps. There will be plenty of yeast in suspension. It's a hefeweizen for cryin' out loud. You should have a hard time ever to get the yeast to drop. ;)

Another interesting tid bit, if you bottle condition in the 70s you can have full carbonation in less than 3 days usually.
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