Author Topic: Modification question  (Read 1285 times)

Offline gymrat

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Modification question
« on: December 05, 2011, 01:25:37 PM »
My next brew is going to be my favorite Red Ale recipe.

9 lbs 2 row barley
12 oz Caramel 40
4 oz Special B
4 oz Roasted Barley
1 oz Cascade Hops
3 oz UK Fuggle hops
Safale US_05

I am thinking about moving my operation to the kitchen for the winter. Maximum boil on my stove would be 3 gallons and that is pushing it. So I am thinking about just boiling my first runnings. I thought I could compensate by adding more grain. Ideally that would be more 2 row barley but I have about 40 pounds of malted wheat collecting dust. So I thought I might use a pound or two of that instead. I am not sure what this will do to the recipe but I bet it will still taste good.

My question is, giving I usually get 75% efficiency doing a batch sparge from my system, how much wheat would I want to add to this recipe to hit an OG of around 1.050?

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Topeka, KS

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Modification question
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2011, 02:09:05 PM »
You are proposing to do a partigyle essentially but not doing your sparge for a second runnings beer.

This tool helps plan out partigyle batches http://brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue2.2/moshertable.html

unfortunatly it doesn't go as low as 1.050, but with a little extrapolation I would say if you build a recipe for 10 gallons of 1.035-1.040 and that will get you fairly close. so you would want around 16lbs total fermentable for a 5 gallon batch of but of course you are looking at a 3 gallon batch so drop that by 40% and you would get around 9.6 lbs which is where you are at.

unless you intend to dilute post boil. Then it's closer to the 16lb number

Offline jeffy

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Re: Modification question
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2011, 03:12:27 PM »
It is not clear to me how many gallons of beer you want to make in this batch.  Is the total going to be 3 gallons or did you plan to boil 3 and then add something post boil to bring it to 5?
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Offline gymrat

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Re: Modification question
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2011, 03:26:11 PM »
Total will be 5 gallons. I intend to make up the difference with water. So I thought I would make a concentrate of sorts.
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Modification question
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2011, 04:31:10 PM »
another question is that 3 gallons pre or post boil?

If pre then you are looking at 2-2.5 gallons post boil at a gravity of between 1.100 and 1.100 post boil. so calc the recipe for a normal sparged 5 gallon batch at 1.075 - 1.094

if Post then you are looking around 1.085 so plan a normal sparged 6 gallon batch at around 1.065

kind of wide range.

Offline gymrat

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Re: Modification question
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2011, 04:58:00 PM »
Preboil and thankyou.
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Offline a10t2

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Re: Modification question
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2011, 06:04:51 PM »
For a no-sparge, you can get a really accurate estimate of the pre-boil gravity as long as you assume 100% conversion efficiency. Given that, the only factor that impacts SG is the liquor-to-grist ratio. Kai has a chart here: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Troubleshooting_Brewhouse_Efficiency#Determining_Conversion_Efficiency

Since you want to dilute to 5 gal at 1.050, you need to collect 3 gal at 1.085. Checking the chart, you can see that requires a mash ratio of 1.44 qt/lb. Assuming 0.12 gal/lb absorption and no dead space, x is the grain weight in pounds:

3 + 0.12x = (1.44/4)x; x = 12.5 lb
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Offline gymrat

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Re: Modification question
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2011, 07:20:05 PM »
For a no-sparge, you can get a really accurate estimate of the pre-boil gravity as long as you assume 100% conversion efficiency. Given that, the only factor that impacts SG is the liquor-to-grist ratio. Kai has a chart here: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Troubleshooting_Brewhouse_Efficiency#Determining_Conversion_Efficiency

Since you want to dilute to 5 gal at 1.050, you need to collect 3 gal at 1.085. Checking the chart, you can see that requires a mash ratio of 1.44 qt/lb. Assuming 0.12 gal/lb absorption and no dead space, x is the grain weight in pounds:

3 + 0.12x = (1.44/4)x; x = 12.5 lb

Ah ok. So I need around 3.5 pounds of base malt. Either go buy some 2 row or use some of my wheat.
Ralph's Brewery
Topeka, KS

Offline gymrat

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Re: Modification question
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2011, 08:16:23 AM »
For a no-sparge, you can get a really accurate estimate of the pre-boil gravity as long as you assume 100% conversion efficiency. Given that, the only factor that impacts SG is the liquor-to-grist ratio. Kai has a chart here: http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Troubleshooting_Brewhouse_Efficiency#Determining_Conversion_Efficiency

Since you want to dilute to 5 gal at 1.050, you need to collect 3 gal at 1.085. Checking the chart, you can see that requires a mash ratio of 1.44 qt/lb. Assuming 0.12 gal/lb absorption and no dead space, x is the grain weight in pounds:

3 + 0.12x = (1.44/4)x; x = 12.5 lb

Thankyou
This is really helpful. It is also giving me an idea of how I can do my Wee Heavy this year. Since I don't drink a lot of it, a 3 gallon batch would be fine. It won't be so expensive and I can use a 5 gallon bucket for a fermenter.
Ralph's Brewery
Topeka, KS