Author Topic: Stout: How sweet is too sweet?  (Read 1629 times)

Offline WesKinetic

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Stout: How sweet is too sweet?
« on: December 13, 2011, 08:09:48 PM »
I'm thinking of brewing a stout that would be spiced somewhat like Cigar City's Hunahpu's Imperial Stout (cocoa, cinnamon, ancho chiles), but would be sessionable strength (5%-5.5%). Hunahpu's Light, if you will.

I want to use some piloncillo in the boil and have a relatively sweet final product to balance out with the chile. But I'm worried my recipe might come out too sweet. Let me know what you think or if you have any suggestions.

MASH
6 1/2 lb two-row
1 lb Crystal 60L
12 oz chocolate malt
8 oz roasted barley
8 oz flaked corn

BOIL
1 lb piloncillo

Never brewed with piloncillo before and just wanted to see what everyone thought. Thanks!

Offline oly

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Re: Stout: How sweet is too sweet?
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2011, 08:27:34 PM »
I don't think that recipe will finish overly sweet. It is a bit high percentage of crystal compared to the base malt but not over the top. The piloncillo won't add any sweetness to the final beer, it will pretty much ferment out completely, in fact it will result in a bit less body than if you used base malt only (to the same OG).  I like piloncillo, I use it in some belgians that I want to finish dry and it does seem to add a bit of flavor that more refined sugars do not.

Offline jamminbrew

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Re: Stout: How sweet is too sweet?
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2011, 08:39:24 PM »
Agreed with Oly, the piloncillo won't add much sweetness, if at all. Should be ok, if not a bit dry.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Stout: How sweet is too sweet?
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2011, 09:09:56 PM »
The roasted barley will give the impression of dryness, the corn and sugar will also dry it out.  The crystal will increase the sweetness perception.

You want it to finish sweeter, but you don't mention your mash temp.  I would try ~156F and see how it comes out.  Or try eliminating some of the things that will make it drier.
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Offline WesKinetic

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Re: Stout: How sweet is too sweet?
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2011, 11:30:42 AM »
Thanks for your help, everybody. I was planning to mash at 156, but I didn't realize that piloncillo would ferment out that much, so that is very helpful. I'll tweak the recipe a bit and should be good to go. Thanks again!

Related question: does piloncillo add much in the way of flavor if used as the priming sugar?

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Stout: How sweet is too sweet?
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2011, 11:48:55 AM »
Thanks for your help, everybody. I was planning to mash at 156, but I didn't realize that piloncillo would ferment out that much, so that is very helpful. I'll tweak the recipe a bit and should be good to go. Thanks again!

Related question: does piloncillo add much in the way of flavor if used as the priming sugar?

I havn't noticed a huge amount of flavour from priming sugar choices. but i have not tried piloncillo

Offline denny

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Re: Stout: How sweet is too sweet?
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2011, 12:05:12 PM »
Related question: does piloncillo add much in the way of flavor if used as the priming sugar?

Not in my experience.
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