Author Topic: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain  (Read 2749 times)

Offline bendbrew

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Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« on: January 20, 2010, 11:32:48 AM »
It may sound somewhat timid but I am considering trying several partial mash recipes prior to jumping into all grain.  I have read Chris Colby's article "Countertop Partial Mashing" which appeared in the October 2006 issue of BYO.  Has anyone tried this approach?  Is there another process I should try?  Thanks.

Offline makemehoppy

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2010, 11:40:02 AM »
Sure it is an easy first step to mash 4-5 lbs of grain and use that as the starting wort to add extract to. Partial mash is nice because you don't need any more special equipment other than a strainer large enough for your grain size. You'll see all grain isn't very hard.

Offline hokerer

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2010, 11:49:19 AM »
You'll see all grain isn't very hard.

+1.  When I started, I did one extract/grains batch, then two or three partial mash batches, saw how easy it was, and then made the jump to all grain.  One thing, while it may be simple to make the jump, it's not necessarily cheap.  Denny's cooler/braid mashtun won't set you back much but all grain means full boil which means big kettle, probably burner, chiller, etc.  Those $ can add up.
Joe

Offline tubercle

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2010, 11:52:48 AM »
A lot of people are intimidated by all grain but once you do it and see how easy it is, you will kick yourself for not doing it sooner.
I suggest you "make the jump" as soon as you can.

 There is that extra expense as mentioned though :P
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Offline bendbrew

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2010, 12:00:16 PM »
Right now the budget is tight.  I am thinking that a partial mash will allow me to test the waters so to speak as I save towards the necessary equipment.

Offline denny

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2010, 12:08:28 PM »
The mashing part of going AG isn't very expensive....just a cooler, a toilet supply hose, some tubing and a cheap nylon valve.  The real expense could come from a kettle and possibly burner for full boils.  But going partial mash or AG doesn't necessarily mean a full boil.  I started doing AG with a partial boil on my stovetop, or brewed 2.5 gal. batches for a full boil.  Take a look at www.dennybrew.com to see how cheaply and easily you can do it.
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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2010, 02:22:40 PM »
  Best advice ever given me is when I was tossing around the idea of partial mash. The dude told me just to go AG. It's essentially the same thing, So just jump in with both feet. It turned out to be simple, and rather inexpensive.  JUST DO IT!   (insert Nike swoosh here)
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Offline bendbrew

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2010, 03:20:56 PM »
I would jump right into all grain but would need to spend some cash on a propane burner, larger kettle (I have a 7.5 gallon), mash tun etc.  My goal when I do is to brew a 10 gallon batch of Denny's Rye IPA with WY1450.

Offline a10t2

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2010, 03:38:23 PM »
A 7.5 gallon kettle is (barely) big enough for 5 gallon batches, so you really just need a propane burner ($30), mash tun ($30-50, depending on how you build it) and basic immersion chiller ($50). Considering you save $10+ on extract each time you brew, the basic equipment isn't hard to justify IMHO.

As Denny pointed out, you could also do partial boils and put off buying the chiller and burner.
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Offline bendbrew

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2010, 03:47:05 PM »
Would a $30 propane burner be sufficient to boil a 10 gallon batch?  My biggest cost would be a proper sized kettle.  How about a pH meter?  I have read about the importance of pH and mash.  Luckily the water here in Bend, OR is clean and soft (which allows for adjustment I guess). 

Offline roffenburger

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2010, 03:58:21 PM »
You should browse on craigslist for a turkey fryer burner. I got mine for $15, and it works perfect for me. I also bought a 36 qt pot for $25 on CL.
Travis R.

Offline mikeypedersen

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2010, 04:06:02 PM »
They're even pretty cheap at Walmart.  They might even have some left over from Thanksgiving.

Offline Lynux

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2010, 04:07:57 PM »
Build a cheap mash tun and brew a few 2.5 gallon batches with the equipment you already have.  Add the rest of the equipment as you have the money to get to 5+ gallons.

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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2010, 04:10:58 PM »
Would a $30 propane burner be sufficient to boil a 10 gallon batch?  My biggest cost would be a proper sized kettle.  How about a pH meter?  I have read about the importance of pH and mash.  Luckily the water here in Bend, OR is clean and soft (which allows for adjustment I guess). 


Dude, I paid 10$ at Target for my burner. Keep your eyes out, and you will score a good deal. And, when you get a turkey fryer, it comes with a 7.5 kettle, perfect for 5 gal batches, till you decide to upgrade your burner. And yes, a turkey fryer burner, typically 55k BTU, if plenty for 10 gal batches. It's how I roll. Now go brew something!!!!
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Offline denny

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Re: Partial Mash As a First Step To All Grain
« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2010, 04:34:31 PM »
Would a $30 propane burner be sufficient to boil a 10 gallon batch?  My biggest cost would be a proper sized kettle.  How about a pH meter?  I have read about the importance of pH and mash.  Luckily the water here in Bend, OR is clean and soft (which allows for adjustment I guess). 

There's probably a BiMart in Bend.  I started doing AG with a turkey fryer kit from BiMart that included a burner and a 7.5 gal. AL kettle.  Got it on sale for $30-40.  10 years later, I use kegs for kettles, but I still use that original AL pot for heating water for my brews.
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