Author Topic: Cider Yeast options  (Read 8784 times)

Offline beerhaus

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Cider Yeast options
« on: December 30, 2011, 01:24:35 PM »
I've used White Labs English cider yeast and White Labs Champagne yeast  any other suggestions I may want to try?

Offline brushvalleybrewer

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2011, 03:34:06 PM »
Wyeast makes a cider yeast that I like.
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Online morticaixavier

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2011, 04:35:52 PM »
you could try some beer yeasts. Belgians maybe. or english.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2011, 07:42:04 PM »
I prefer Côte des Blancs for cider.  You still have to back sweeten it.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2011, 06:19:35 AM »
Cote des Blancs is good.  My favorite of the moment is good old US-05.  If you use liquid yeast, be sure to step it up to a big starter (using some sweet apple cider as the liquid).
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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2011, 08:17:44 AM »
I like Red Star Premier Cuvee and fermenting around 45-50F. Cold fermentation helps maintain the aromatics from the apples and premier cuvee is very cold tolerant.
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Offline cheba420

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2011, 09:27:58 AM »
I've used a few. From Nottingham, to the WL English Cider to us-05. I think theres been a champaigne yeast in there somewhere along the line. I liked the WL English cider the best. It was clean, crisp and tart. Went all the way down to practically zero. I back sweeten to 08 or 10 and it makes a really nice cider.
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Offline livefreebrewfree

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2011, 09:36:47 AM »
I think I'm going to try Wyeast 4134 sake yeast in my 3 gallon cider batch coming up. I bought it to make sake but never got around to it so I figured I'd use it now before the viability is questionable.

Offline denny

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2011, 09:55:57 AM »
I like either a champagne yeast or the Wyeast cider yeast.  My experience is that yeast strain doesn't make nearly as much difference in cider as it does in beer.  I've made and tasted ciders made with Belgian strains that can have a lot of character on beer, but in cider you'd never know it was a Belgian yeast.
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Offline qmi6

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2012, 07:34:35 PM »
I have used the Wyeast Cider Yeast several times and it works well.  I have used champagne yeast as well.  As expected the champagne yeast ends dry and bottles very well.  The cider yeast leaves a lot more fruit flavor in my opinion but doesn't bottle as nicely. 
I haven't taken the step of using champagne yeast to bottle since I've been worried that it will eat up more sugar than the cider yeast.  I just wait an extra month or so before enjoying.
In either case make sure you pitch a lot of healthy yeast.  It always seems to take a bit longer even with nutrient added for my ciders to get moving.

I like the idea of using Belgian yeast.  I guess I never really thought about using "beer yeast" for cider.  It makes a lot of sense if you are looking to add some other flavors with the yeast.  I should try a small batch.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2012, 05:38:20 AM »
Belgian yeast used in cider doesn't taste anything like beer with Belgian yeast.  Don't expect what you think you should expect.  It won't happen.
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Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2012, 06:56:09 AM »
My experience is that yeast strain doesn't make nearly as much difference in cider as it does in beer.  I've made and tasted ciders made with Belgian strains that can have a lot of character on beer, but in cider you'd never know it was a Belgian yeast.

I agree. I've tried many yeasts and the characteristics listed for yeasts, wine or beer, don't really apply when fermenting something different, like apple juice. Those characteristics must depend on the presence of certain sugars and other compounds in wort or grape must.
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Offline alikocho

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2012, 09:32:44 PM »
Depends if the juice is pasteurised/sulfited or not. If not, just let it ride and use the natural yeasts already present.

Else, Lalvin KV or EC work well.
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Offline gmac

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2012, 10:37:47 PM »
What a coincidence. I was at a friends tonight who moved here from England and he was commenting that cider here was sweeter than cider in Britain. Do all the yeasts make a dry cider that is back sweetened or do some yeasts finish drier than others?  I said I'd try a cider for him so this is a great thread to see active.
I was going to use unpasteurized cider pressed fresh from the orchards down the road. Any apples that are better than others?

Online mtnrockhopper

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Re: Cider Yeast options
« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2012, 06:59:00 AM »
There is very little difference in residual sugars between yeast strains. Apple sugars are all simple and very fermentable, and the sugar content is low so there is no chance the alcohol content will max out as with wine or mead. Cidermakers trying to retain residual sweetness naturally do things contrary to yeast health in beer brewing - such as stripping out nutrients, underpitching yeast, and racking before fermentation is complete.  Other than that, the only option for most is killing the yeast, sweetening, and force carbonating.

Fresh cider from down the road is the best place to start. Taste the sweet cider, the better it tastes, the better the finished product.

Some apples are better than others, but that is a complex topic and the best varieties aren't widely grown anymore. Try here for more information.
http://www.ciderworkshop.com
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