Author Topic: belgians for ageing  (Read 1572 times)

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Re: belgians for ageing
« Reply #15 on: January 07, 2012, 05:24:28 AM »
Don't feel like you have to stick to aany type of style guide lines. Belgian beers sure don't. Think along the lines of Oerbier from the de Dolle Brothers. Dark, 9% belgian ale. SLightly sour and slightly oaky. Probably blended. Very nice beer but not along the lines of any "style" per say. I personally don't care for most sours. Rodenbach is just too damn sour and some of the others I have tried, like La Follie just taste like that sour vomit taste you get in the back of your mouth when you feel like you are going to puke but choke it back. Just a warning. Moderation is generally the key for my taste, a touch of funck but nothing overwhelming. I like mine to taste more like beer than salad dressing.  And maybe brew something along side to blend if needed.

OTOH you may like the taste of vomit in the back of your throat, I dunno. Lots do.  ;)
Keith Y.

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Offline bluesman

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Re: belgians for ageing
« Reply #16 on: January 07, 2012, 10:49:08 AM »
I also think that blending is a great way to acheive the desired flavors. Rodenbach Grand Cru is pretty acidic for me as well but if you can imagine that blended with a Quad or a malty Dubbel in desirable proportions it can be an awesome flavor. Blending is more of an advanced technique but I find it to be very rewarding and it can bring out the best of two very different beers as well.

More food for thought.  :)
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Offline morticaixavier

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Re: belgians for ageing
« Reply #17 on: January 07, 2012, 04:41:33 PM »
Very cool ideas. I had actually started contemplating some blending. I am thinking next year 2013 I would brew some sort of big blueberry centered ale for this event and perhaps do some blending with a portion of the sour I hold back from bottles. Is there any reason I couldn't transfer a gallon of the sour from the barrel after an appropriate amount of time to a gallon jug and keep it there uncarbed for the rest of the year?
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