Author Topic: Hop Bursting  (Read 9478 times)

Offline rjharper

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Hop Bursting
« on: January 22, 2012, 01:37:37 AM »
Recently at the COOP Aleworks anniversary party, they unleashed a small batch IPA, with 24oz of hops in a 5 gal recipe.  Needless to say it was awesome, and gone in no time at all.  It got me thinking, and then Austin Homebrew has an 18oz hop value pack of 3oz each of Columbus, Warrior, Summit, Nugget, Galena and Willamette.  With the exception of Willamette, these are all high alpha varieties.  I'm thinking of brewing my usual 1.060 IPA grain bill, but hop bursting so the Warrior, Galena and Nugget go in at 5 mins, the Willamette at flameout, then dry hopping on the Summit and Columbus.

Any thoughts or suggestions?
Thanks,
Ross
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Tippecanoe Homebrewers Circle (West Lafayette, IN)

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Offline pinnah

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2012, 07:57:34 AM »
Never have tried a first addition at 5.
My hop burst schedules usually start at 20, then 15, 10, 5,0 and dry.

As to the hops, I might consider using some of that Columbus and Summit in the boil, as well as dry.
That said, I don't have any experience with Galena or Warrior late.

Have fun. :)


Offline bonjour

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2012, 08:44:42 AM »
You need more time for the hop flavor to develop

http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/AmarilloPaleAleBeerDuJour
First hops at 15 minutes and more to follow.  I need to brew this again.
If you can't get Amarillo go with another hop you like.
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Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

Offline tviemont

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #3 on: January 26, 2012, 12:31:43 PM »
I've tried a few hop bursted beers without great results.  Recently, I've learned that the key to hop bursting is a hot stand.  Take a look at Ray Daniel's 2009 NHC presentation for details.  Essentially, a panel of experts preferred beers that had a long, hot, post-boil, pre-chill stand of up to 80 minutes over beers that were chilled more quickly. 

I'm going to try this with my next pale ale to see if I can finally get the hop flavor I'm looking for.

Offline pinnah

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2012, 12:35:25 PM »
Sweet. 8)

I guess I would say that hop bursting can work without the hop stand,
that said, when used together they REALLY work!

Have fun!


Offline jmcamerlengo

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2012, 12:49:52 PM »
I've tried a few hop bursted beers without great results.  Recently, I've learned that the key to hop bursting is a hot stand.  Take a look at Ray Daniel's 2009 NHC presentation for details.  Essentially, a panel of experts preferred beers that had a long, hot, post-boil, pre-chill stand of up to 80 minutes over beers that were chilled more quickly. 

I'm going to try this with my next pale ale to see if I can finally get the hop flavor I'm looking for.

This doesnt cause DMS issues?  I thought the object was to chill as quickly as possible.
Jason
-Head Brewer, Brewtus Brewers in the Shenango Valley. Hopefully opening a brewpub/nano brewery in the next couple years.

Offline pinnah

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2012, 06:23:51 PM »
Seems to me,
these techniques really apply for a particular style - IPA,
and not so much for the majority of other styles.

If your quest is to achieve ultimate infusion of hop flavor and aroma,
the hop burst, hop stand, and the dry hop are for you.

A brewer can break lots of "strict" rules on such a versatile and forgiving style.

You may wind up with late IBU contribution impossible to accurately calculate, you have to forget about your particular FO to pitch temp record, you end up with a discernible haze...a chewy hop character... :o...no matter, its an IPA! ;)

Enjoy!





Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2012, 07:14:06 PM »
I've tried a few hop bursted beers without great results.  Recently, I've learned that the key to hop bursting is a hot stand.  Take a look at Ray Daniel's 2009 NHC presentation for details.  Essentially, a panel of experts preferred beers that had a long, hot, post-boil, pre-chill stand of up to 80 minutes over beers that were chilled more quickly.  

I'm going to try this with my next pale ale to see if I can finally get the hop flavor I'm looking for.

This doesnt cause DMS issues?  I thought the object was to chill as quickly as possible.

You want to keep the lid off, and this is after a vigourous boil. It is hot enough that the vapors coming off are keeping nasties out.  You want to chill as fast as possible for beers with pils malt, that is the difference.

Once you are done with the stand, chill as normal.  In my 10  gallons batches, it is down to about 175 after 45 minutes.  The best beer was made after a hop stand for flavor, and dry hopping for aroma according to Daniels at the NHC 2009.

I have made a cream ale that was no boil hops, all hops added at knock out.  Really tasty.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2012, 07:19:48 PM by hopfenundmalz »
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Offline tviemont

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2012, 10:14:21 AM »
The kilning process removes SMM, the precursor to DMS, from most malt.  Pilsner malt is the exception b/c it's lightly kilned. 


Offline pinnah

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2012, 10:57:38 AM »
I have made a cream ale that was no boil hops, all hops added at knock out.  Really tasty.

 8), can you describe if and how it was different tasting from your normal cream ale? 

Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2012, 11:00:40 AM »
I have made a cream ale that was no boil hops, all hops added at knock out.  Really tasty.

 8), can you describe if and how it was different tasting from your normal cream ale? 
This might of been the first Cream Ale in 10 years. It was a knock off of Pelican Kiwanda Cream Ale.  The brewer says this is the way they do it, and get 25 IBU's.  Seems to work, and you get flavor and aroma.
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Offline roguejim

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2012, 12:31:11 PM »
Could someone explain a bit this "hot stand"?  Someone mentioned a hot stand for flavor.  I'm not clear on this.  Basically, you just let the hot wort sit after the boil is through?  Hop additions are done when?

Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2012, 12:45:40 PM »
Could someone explain a bit this "hot stand"?  Someone mentioned a hot stand for flavor.  I'm not clear on this.  Basically, you just let the hot wort sit after the boil is through?  Hop additions are done when?

You can let it stand when done, with the lid off.  The hops that have been added in the boil can remain, and give some more bitterness, even when not boiling.  The hops added late will also give flavor and aroma.  You can add hops at knockout.  You can add hops at lower temps, like 180F for instance, and these give more aroma.

After 45 minutes I turn on the chiller water and proceed as usual.
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Offline roguejim

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2012, 03:54:32 PM »
If you add hops at flameout, and let them steep for 45 minutes, aren't you losing aromatics?

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2012, 04:05:06 PM »
Yes, but not as much as if they were boiled.  You can add more with dry hops if you wish.
Jeff Rankert
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Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!