Author Topic: Hop Bursting  (Read 7937 times)

Offline pyrite

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2012, 11:03:23 PM »
You need more time for the hop flavor to develop

http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/AmarilloPaleAleBeerDuJour
First hops at 15 minutes and more to follow.  I need to brew this again.
If you can't get Amarillo go with another hop you like.

Excuse me, what brewing software is this that you are using to upload your recipe to the wikihomebrew?
If you don't get in over your head, how are you ever going to know how tall you are.

Offline richardt

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2012, 12:55:33 PM »
I read somewhere that various desired hop oils have flash points (between 100-180 F, I think), so a brief chill down after FO to get the wort temp below 170-180 F was suggested before adding the steeping hops.

I've been doing Hop Stands between 140-170 F for approximately 20-30 minutes.  I think it helps extract hop flavors and aromas, though the aromas are often lost/diluted by the CO2 outgassing during fermentation.  Dry hopping is a good way to get back some of the aromas, but at the cost of grassy flavors and less clarity.
What do you think?  Does the additional steeping time make a difference?

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2012, 01:24:37 PM »
I read somewhere that various desired hop oils have flash points (between 100-180 F, I think), so a brief chill down after FO to get the wort temp below 170-180 F was suggested before adding the steeping hops.

I've been doing Hop Stands between 140-170 F for approximately 20-30 minutes.  I think it helps extract hop flavors and aromas, though the aromas are often lost/diluted by the CO2 outgassing during fermentation.  Dry hopping is a good way to get back some of the aromas, but at the cost of grassy flavors and less clarity.
What do you think?  Does the additional steeping time make a difference?

The only hop essential oil that has a flash point over 180F is Caryopholene (SP) at 200F, and this one has spicy charactor like black pepper.  The others are about 78F to 112F, which is why you can get the big aroma from dry hopping, and that is why you want to dry hop at room temperature.  When you rub hops between your hands, you are flashing off some of those oils due to your body temp and friction heat
Jeff Rankert
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Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Online jeffy

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2012, 03:15:24 PM »
I read somewhere that various desired hop oils have flash points (between 100-180 F, I think), so a brief chill down after FO to get the wort temp below 170-180 F was suggested before adding the steeping hops.

I've been doing Hop Stands between 140-170 F for approximately 20-30 minutes.  I think it helps extract hop flavors and aromas, though the aromas are often lost/diluted by the CO2 outgassing during fermentation.  Dry hopping is a good way to get back some of the aromas, but at the cost of grassy flavors and less clarity.
What do you think?  Does the additional steeping time make a difference?

The only hop essential oil that has a flash point over 180F is Caryopholene (SP) at 200F, and this one has spicy charactor like black pepper.  The others are about 78F to 112F, which is why you can get the big aroma from dry hopping, and that is why you want to dry hop at room temperature.  When you rub hops between your hands, you are flashing off some of those oils due to your body temp and friction heat

I made a couple of beers with the last hop addition in the whirlpool for at least 40 minutes, after the wort had been cooled down to 100.  I was expecting more aroma than I got.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2012, 04:22:39 PM »
I read somewhere that various desired hop oils have flash points (between 100-180 F, I think), so a brief chill down after FO to get the wort temp below 170-180 F was suggested before adding the steeping hops.

I've been doing Hop Stands between 140-170 F for approximately 20-30 minutes.  I think it helps extract hop flavors and aromas, though the aromas are often lost/diluted by the CO2 outgassing during fermentation.  Dry hopping is a good way to get back some of the aromas, but at the cost of grassy flavors and less clarity.
What do you think?  Does the additional steeping time make a difference?

The only hop essential oil that has a flash point over 180F is Caryopholene (SP) at 200F, and this one has spicy charactor like black pepper.  The others are about 78F to 112F, which is why you can get the big aroma from dry hopping, and that is why you want to dry hop at room temperature.  When you rub hops between your hands, you are flashing off some of those oils due to your body temp and friction heat

I made a couple of beers with the last hop addition in the whirlpool for at least 40 minutes, after the wort had been cooled down to 100.  I was expecting more aroma than I got.

Flashpoints for the oils. 

Farnesene = 79F
Myrcene = 104F
Humulene = 110.2°F
Caryophyllene =200F

From here:  http://www.ahaconference.org/wp-content/uploads/presentations/2010/Hop_Quality-James_Altweis.pdf


The oils also are not very soluble, so that is probably why we dryhop for a week or more.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild, AHA Member, BJCP Certified
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline erockrph

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #20 on: February 13, 2012, 11:07:57 AM »
Recently at the COOP Aleworks anniversary party, they unleashed a small batch IPA, with 24oz of hops in a 5 gal recipe.  Needless to say it was awesome, and gone in no time at all.  It got me thinking, and then Austin Homebrew has an 18oz hop value pack of 3oz each of Columbus, Warrior, Summit, Nugget, Galena and Willamette.  With the exception of Willamette, these are all high alpha varieties.  I'm thinking of brewing my usual 1.060 IPA grain bill, but hop bursting so the Warrior, Galena and Nugget go in at 5 mins, the Willamette at flameout, then dry hopping on the Summit and Columbus.

Any thoughts or suggestions?
Thanks,

Warrior, Galena and Nugget are generally used for bittering, (although I have heard of Nugget being used for dry hopping), so I'm not sure how much you're going to get from adding them that late in the boil. If it were me I'd use the Columbus, Summit and Willamette for my late adds and dry hops (maybe use a bit of the Nugget late as well). Then I'd calculate an estimated IBU from the late adds, and use the bittering hops at the beginning of the boil to bring me in range of the IBU level I'm shooting for.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline rjharper

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Re: Hop Bursting
« Reply #21 on: February 13, 2012, 02:16:46 PM »
Warrior, Galena and Nugget are generally used for bittering, (although I have heard of Nugget being used for dry hopping), so I'm not sure how much you're going to get from adding them that late in the boil. If it were me I'd use the Columbus, Summit and Willamette for my late adds and dry hops (maybe use a bit of the Nugget late as well). Then I'd calculate an estimated IBU from the late adds, and use the bittering hops at the beginning of the boil to bring me in range of the IBU level I'm shooting for.

That was my original plan.  But then I got adventurous / carried away and decided to mix the hops up more.  So in the end I ran with this recipe.

12lbs 2-row
1lb C60
1lb Wheat
2oz Carafa III (for color)

3oz each of Amarillo, Columbus, Galena, Nugget, Summit and Willamette
0.25oz of each at 15, 10, 7.5, 5, 2.5 and 1 minutes
0.5 oz of each for aroma added at 180F during cooling
1 oz of each for dry hopping

I'm looking at 10.65 OG, 95 IBUs, 15 SRM.  I know, maybe a little too bitter, but what the hey, there may be a little residual sweetness from the C60.  Its falls somewhere between American and Imperial IPA.

Oh, and I forgot the Irish Moss in my haste to measure out that many hops.  So crash cooling and maybe gelatin it is...