Author Topic: Measuring mash pH  (Read 7913 times)

Offline dbarber

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Re: Measuring mash pH
« Reply #15 on: January 23, 2012, 11:59:25 AM »
I use gypsum, calcium chloride, and/or lactic acid for decreasing the pH and pickling lime, baking soda for increasing the pH.
Dave Barber
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Measuring mash pH
« Reply #16 on: January 23, 2012, 12:28:17 PM »
I use gypsum, calcium chloride, and/or lactic acid for decreasing the pH and pickling lime, baking soda for increasing the pH.

I start with RO water.  Like David I use Gypsum and CaCl2 to get the calcium up.  Phosphoric acid instead of lactic, though I have lactic also.  Pickling lime to raise the pH (Chalk is on the shelf).  Ocassionally use some baking soda to help raise pH.  Epsom salts if I think there might be a need for more Mg, but I am using that less and less, as I read more and more that enough Mg is supplied from the mash for the yeast health.

I gave away what was left of the 5.2 stabalizer that I tried.  That should tell you my opinion of it. Really like the other 5 star products.
Jeff Rankert
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Offline Malticulous

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Re: Measuring mash pH
« Reply #17 on: January 23, 2012, 12:42:07 PM »
I never bothered with a water test. I know my water varies a little seasonally. Most do. The bulk of it is from a fairly consistent source of Mt. Springs but it's a blend of few streams too. The city has reports on all of them but not the percentages used in my blend.

Testing mashes with Precision Labs 40-70  papers (rated +/- .5)  I know it dosen't have too much chalk in it, but I never have wanted to add any. That seems to be the worst thing to have a lot of in water.  I've been able to make well scoring examples of pilsner and porter with very little adjustment. Some RO for bo pils, Calcium Chloride in most beers and Gypsum in a few styles (from experience I know my sulfates are very low).  Light beers get some phosphoric acid in the sparge.

Maybe I'm lucky but it is just fine tuning here.


Close enough for me.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2012, 01:23:40 PM by Malticulous »

Offline denny

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Re: Measuring mash pH
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2012, 12:55:16 PM »
Thanks for the info and references.  I will analyze my water to see what beer styles I will be most successful at where I live.  I'm a little depressed, because I really didn't want to add the complication of treating water to the brewing process. 

Let me assure you that you can make really good beer without treating your water, assuming it's not too extreme to start with.  I brewed AG for about 10 years, winning awards along the way, before I ever messed with my water.  But I think my beers are much better since I started adjusting my water.  So, if your water is fairly "normal", go ahead and learn to brew AG and then worry about your water.
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Offline denny

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Re: Measuring mash pH
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2012, 12:57:06 PM »
Or does a "pH stabilizer" like this from Morebeer work just as well?

http://morebeer.com/view_product/19873/102199/52_ph_Stabilizer_-_1_lb

It didn't work for me and many others have said the same thing.
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Offline jeffy

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Re: Measuring mash pH
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2012, 03:11:49 PM »
So what chemicals do you guys have at hand to adjust the water?  Or does a "pH stabilizer" like this from Morebeer work just as well?

http://morebeer.com/view_product/19873/102199/52_ph_Stabilizer_-_1_lb

As discussed in several other threads, the 52 stabilizer doesn't seem to do much.
I keep Gypsum, Calcium Chloride, Calcium Sulphate and Magnesium Sulphate on hand, but I use lactic acid to acidify the mash in pale colored beers for the most part.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995