Author Topic: Natural Carbonating in a Keg  (Read 2548 times)

Offline cheshirecat

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Natural Carbonating in a Keg
« on: February 17, 2012, 11:57:33 AM »
So I have a few full kegs that I thought I would natural carbonating while they are waiting their rotation into my kegerator. Figure that way they are ready to roll when I put them in (after cooling down of course).

Two questions:

1) Any significant issues with this?

2) I am getting all sorts of conflicting info on how much sugar to use. I know it is less then what you would use to bottle. I have read 1/3 to 1/2 of the amount. Beersmith's carbonation tool suggests about 42g (at 65 degrees for 5 gallons) which is about half. What do you think would be a good amount?

Thanks!

Offline hamiltont

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Re: Natural Carbonating in a Keg
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2012, 12:02:34 PM »
I've done it before with 1/2. Be prepared for a bit more crud with your first few pints.  That's about the only downside I saw. Cheers!
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

Offline calpyro

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Re: Natural Carbonating in a Keg
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2012, 08:27:33 PM »
So I have a few full kegs that I thought I would natural carbonating while they are waiting their rotation into my kegerator. Figure that way they are ready to roll when I put them in (after cooling down of course).

Two questions:

1) Any significant issues with this?

2) I am getting all sorts of conflicting info on how much sugar to use. I know it is less then what you would use to bottle. I have read 1/3 to 1/2 of the amount. Beersmith's carbonation tool suggests about 42g (at 65 degrees for 5 gallons) which is about half. What do you think would be a good amount?

Thanks!

I use 1/3 cup of sugar per keg. I use it to reduce the oxidation of the finished beer

Offline chemman14

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Re: Natural Carbonating in a Keg
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2012, 11:13:58 AM »
I did this with a belgian strong dark. The og was 1.100 and fg 1.013 so the yeast had already been through a lot.  I used beer smith to calculate the ammount of sugar needed.  Added that to the keg and then racked on top and sealed with 30 psi.  It is delicious now 3 months later

Offline denny

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Re: Natural Carbonating in a Keg
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2012, 11:46:27 AM »
Kinda OT, but I have a nit to pick with the phrase "natural carbonation".  There's nothing any more natural about priming a keg than there is about using a CO2 tank.  At least IMO.  I'd personally like to see people stick with the more accurate terms "priming" and "force carbonating".  End of lecture....:)
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Offline bo

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Re: Natural Carbonating in a Keg
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2012, 11:54:13 AM »
Kinda OT, but I have a nit to pick with the phrase "natural carbonation".  There's nothing any more natural about priming a keg than there is about using a CO2 tank.  At least IMO.  I'd personally like to see people stick with the more accurate terms "priming" and "force carbonating".  End of lecture....:)

Gotta disagree. I think the term "natural carbonation" is spot on. I relate it to growing plants under artificial or natural lighting. A CO2 tank is artificial, IMO.