Author Topic: First runnings mash  (Read 344 times)

Offline Robert

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2000
    • View Profile
Re: First runnings mash
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2018, 02:26:48 PM »
To quote Ron Pattinson,  "Forget what you think you know about parti-gyling.  The method employed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries isn't what you'll find described in home brewing books. " Yes, what the OP describes is what homebrewers have long called parti gyle.  But it's not the commercial British practice of that name.  Something like the homebrew practice goes back a long way.  Before the introduction of sparging, brewers would sometimes run off the wort and proceed to boil and ferment it, "cap" the mash with around 10% fresh malt,  reflood the tun, rest, and run off a smaller wort.  More than once, maybe.  This was never called "parti gyle," and the practice was abandoned after the 18th century, as sparging took hold.   The practice of sparging originated in Scotland and was adopted in England from the 1850s.  This led eventually to the practice of parti gyle as I describe it, a far more efficient brewing system,  which is still in commercial use today.  You can look at old brewing books like The London and Country Brewer for variations on the older systems of multiple mashes, each producing a separately hopped and boiled wort, and Ron Pattinson (and later manuals) on "modern" parti gyle methods.  Still, the proper distinction is between "parti gyle," literally meaning "split batch," and "multiple mashes."  Because I'm being pedantic.  And it helps to have a common language for discussion.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline James K

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 397
  • Flagstaff, AZ
    • View Profile
Re: First runnings mash
« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2018, 07:12:05 PM »
Yeah, never done that, but when I sparge, I can always tell the transition from first wort to sparge by the instantaneous change in color! Pretty drastic.

The first batch was a bit Amber in color. At least when the beer has a volume like in the carboy. The second batch was like pale yellow, I can actually see through the carboy while it’s fermenting.
But yes basically free beer. I bought an extra yeast pack and a pack of hops so. What’s $15 for an extra hour of time.

It’s adtually really interesting watching the two ferment side by side. Hey are different yeast strains and behave completely different. One the krausen grew upward and blew out (the big beer). The smaller beer, it’s like he Krausen gren downward and didn’t blow anything off.

So I don’t know why that is, if it has to do with the yeast, or the sugars. But I added two#s sugar to both batches.
Vice President of Flagstaff Mountain-Top Mashers
2017 Homebrewer of the year
"One mouth doesn't taste the beer."

Offline James K

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 397
  • Flagstaff, AZ
    • View Profile
Re: First runnings mash
« Reply #17 on: October 13, 2018, 08:56:30 PM »
Update
The first running is still very active and has a fair amount of movement in the carboy. It blew off a solid gallon of liquid volume.
The second running is completely clear/transparent and finished in about 4 days. It did not blow anything off. Both are more similar in color than before. But at this moment the first running is probably going to be a three week fermentation. I’ll probbaly bottle the first running and keg the second.
More to come after I get some tasting notes.
Vice President of Flagstaff Mountain-Top Mashers
2017 Homebrewer of the year
"One mouth doesn't taste the beer."