Author Topic: how recent should a water report be?  (Read 674 times)

Offline sparkleberry

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how recent should a water report be?
« on: February 05, 2012, 01:51:12 PM »
the ladwp has a water report online for easy access.

the only trouble seems to be that it is from 2010.

is this too old to be looking at for jumping into water chemistry?

what beers are los angeles based brewer's having best luck with?

cheers and thanks.
cheers.

rpl
apertureales

Offline mabrungard

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Re: how recent should a water report be?
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2012, 03:04:43 PM »
Water supply characteristics don't typically change if the supply is consistent.  For instance, if the supply is a big lake or big aquifer, then I wouldn't expect much change.  If its a river or a combination of differing reservoirs or lakes, then change could be daily.  Look at the supply in this way and that will enable you to assess if the water report is out of date.  More than likely, its OK. 

If the supply is really variable, then you really need to know how wide the variation is.  You would also have to have a simple set of test kits on hand for hardness and alkalinity so that you could nail down your water adjustments. 
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Offline narcout

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Re: how recent should a water report be?
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2012, 03:26:10 PM »
Your best bet is to get your tap water analyzed by Ward Labs.  Water souces for LA vary quite a bit depending on where you are at.

If you happen to be in West Hollywood, I'd be happy to send you a copy of my tap water analysis.


Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: how recent should a water report be?
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2012, 01:04:01 PM »
Water supply characteristics don't typically change if the supply is consistent.  For instance, if the supply is a big lake or big aquifer, then I wouldn't expect much change.  If its a river or a combination of differing reservoirs or lakes, then change could be daily.

Water supply can also change seasonally. For example, in the Western parts of the U.S. you can get drops in minerals in the spring as snowmelt in the mountains runs off and river levels rise.

Climate can also play a role. Lots of rain can slightly dilute mineral concentrations in reservoirs or rivers, drought and low water levels can increase them. Hot weather can increase chloramine/chlorine levels since treatment plants have to add a bit more to keep bacterial levels down. In extreme cases, warmer weather can also increase algae, which can give the water off-flavors and aromas.

The moral is that if you live in an area where the water source varies widely, you might want to get your water checked rather than relying on the yearly water report, which just gives high-low ranges and averages. Once you know your water, however, old data is probably still good as long as conditions haven't changed drastically.