Author Topic: english 2-row substitute  (Read 1891 times)

Offline saintpierre

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english 2-row substitute
« on: February 06, 2012, 06:00:11 PM »
At my wifes request I am planning a dry stout using the following gist

Final Volume = 12 gal
14# English Pale Malt
4# Flaked Barley
2# Black Roasted Barley

I have half a sack of American Pale 2-row that I would like to use.

My question is what grains should/can I blend with the Amer. 2-row to get that richer English malt flavor? Or should I just pony up and buy English base malt and save my grain for the next one?
Mike St. Pierre
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Offline The Professor

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2012, 06:36:11 PM »
I could be wrong, but in my opinion with all that roasted barley in there, the American 2-row replacing the British  is not going be so big an issue...especially if you're aiming at a dry stout.  
Throw some Munich or something in there if it makes you feel better, but if it were me, I'd just use what you have.  It should be fine.  I'd say just go for it.

Others will weigh in, I'm sure.  Add up the responses,  and take an average.   ;)
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Offline hokerer

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2012, 07:06:04 PM »
Agreed, with that much Roast Barley, I wouldn't think the base malt is going to make much difference
Joe

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2012, 07:17:32 PM »
I agree.  That's a huge amount of roasted barley you've got there.  I'd consider taking that way down.

As for the English malt, you could attempt to simulate it by toasting your own American 2-row.  Put it in a 375 F oven for 20 minutes on a sheet pan and I bet you'll come real close.  If nothing else it will add a very pleasant biscuity flavor.
Dave

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Offline majorvices

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2012, 08:54:29 PM »
i think that for 12 gallons that is the right amount of roasted barley. Spot on looks like the traditional dry stout recipe to me. Dave must be thinking 5 gallon recipe.

I do agree that you probably can just skate with what you have. You could sub out a pound or two of victory for the two row to get a more complex malt flaor.
Keith Y.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2012, 10:14:32 PM »
I'm with Keith, I use 1.75 lbs for 10 gallons, this is right in line with that.

I use MO in mine, but I would try it with the Am Pale and see how it turns out.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2012, 05:34:42 AM »
i think that for 12 gallons that is the right amount of roasted barley. Spot on looks like the traditional dry stout recipe to me. Dave must be thinking 5 gallon recipe.

Keith is right, of course.  I blew past the part where you said this was for 12 gallons, and I assumed 5.  Whoops.
Dave

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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2012, 05:37:32 AM »
Try 80% 2-Row and 20% Munich.
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Offline dak0415

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2012, 09:24:09 AM »
Or sub out 2-3 lbs of Vienna for the 2-row and split the Roast Barley with 1 lb of Black Patent?
« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 09:25:41 AM by dak0415 »
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Offline saintpierre

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2012, 01:03:07 PM »
Great! Thanks for the responses.  My LHBS tends to be out of ingredients often and your responses are just what I was looking for.

I was thinking of maybe substituting a little victory for some of the pale malt so I will go with Keith's solution unless they're out...
Mike St. Pierre
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Offline bluesman

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2012, 02:58:56 PM »
I like to use Maris Otter in stouts. However Brittish 2 row with some Munich and a touch of Victory would work beautifully.
Ron Price

Offline skyler

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Re: english 2-row substitute
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2012, 07:38:05 PM »
My trick for making "Mock Maris Otter" is adding about 4-6 oz of Special Roast per 10 lb of domestic 2-row. So you could try adding a half pound of it to your dry stout.