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Yeast alcohol tolerance concern

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etbrew:
I'm planning on brewing an imperial stout this week.  I'm estimating the OG to be approx 1.110+ and I'm shooting for a FG of the 1.022+ range.  I have made my starter with Wyeast 1056 and then realized the alcohol tolerance for this yeast is around 10% ABV This beer will be close to that level and I'm worried it won't ferment completely, or it get's most of the job done, look like it has finished fermenting, I bottle it, and I get no carbonation.

So I have a a couple questions:
Will this yeast be able to handle the alcohol level?
If not, do any of you have a suggestion for another yeast strain I should use?  (my fermentation temp will be around 66 F)
Is there a way I could tell if I killed the yeast before bottling?

-Eric

denny:
I've used that yeast for beers up to 12% and it worked fine.  I'd recommend brewing a mid 40s gravity batch first and using the entire slurry from that.  You will almost certainly need to add more yeast at bottling.

etbrew:

--- Quote from: denny on January 25, 2010, 02:35:46 PM ---I've used that yeast for beers up to 12% and it worked fine.  I'd recommend brewing a mid 40s gravity batch first and using the entire slurry from that.  You will almost certainly need to add more yeast at bottling.

--- End quote ---

Thanks.

I do have about 2 cups of slurry from a batch of porter but there's a chance it could be contaminated (it started out as 4 cups but I dropped the jar on the floor and sprayed yeast all over my kitchen...it was great  :-[ )

So in the absence of a batch of slurry what are your thoughts?  My plan was to make a 2 quart starter today, then add another quart of starter wort to the original to give me a gallon starter.

This would be the first time I've added yeast at bottling.  How much yeast should I add at bottling?
 

skyler:

--- Quote from: etbrew on January 25, 2010, 03:56:36 PM ---
--- Quote from: denny on January 25, 2010, 02:35:46 PM --- I'd recommend brewing a mid 40s gravity batch first and using the entire slurry from that.

--- End quote ---

So in the absence of a batch of slurry what are your thoughts?  My plan was to make a 2 quart starter today, then add another quart of starter wort to the original to give me a gallon starter.

 How much yeast should I add at bottling?
 

--- End quote ---

What he is saying is that you should brew a whole mid-40s (1.043-1.047) beer. You could do something along the lines of a K├Âlsch, a dry stout, or even an American Wheat beer.... Then pitch your Imperial Stout on top of that slurry. I would even go as far as brewing something in the low 50s, like a 1.052 pale ale, before pitching the full slurry.

As for the yeast to add at bottling, just pitch a pack (or maybe 2 in this case) of US-05 a day or two before you bottle. Some people recommend bottling with Champagne yeast in a beer that big, but I have never done that.

a10t2:

--- Quote from: etbrew on January 25, 2010, 03:56:36 PM ---So in the absence of a batch of slurry what are your thoughts?  My plan was to make a 2 quart starter today, then add another quart of starter wort to the original to give me a gallon starter.
--- End quote ---

That won't give you the cell count of a gallon starter, or even a 3 quart starter. You need to increase the volume at each stage to get substantial growth.

For a 1.110 beer, you need about 400B cells. I'm guessing you're limited by the use of a gallon jug? In that case make a 1 L starter, let it ferment out, chill and decant, then add another 2.5 L of wort. Shake up both stages as much as possible. Again, I'm assuming you don't have a stir plate.

To add yeast at bottling, just use the cheapest dry yeast you can find (probably Nottingham), rehydrate about 1/4 of the packet, and add it to the bottling bucket. You don't need much yeast to carbonate.

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