Author Topic: Cali Common  (Read 1661 times)

Offline jivetyrant

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Re: Cali Common
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2012, 06:16:51 AM »
My first Cali Common is actually in the fermentor as we speak.  As such, I can't offer much in the way of advice but I'll share the recipe I used anyway!  The grain bill is a bit odd for a Cali Common in the current sense, but I am trying for more of a pre-prohibition era steam beer.  After reading the chapter on Cali Commons in Designing Great Beer I was smitten with the idea of a less attenuated, mouth filling beer which was made in that time period.  I ended up using NB anyway, even though I don't believe that was used at the time.  I don't intend on lagering this batch, as according to his account the beer was sold "fresh" having been given only 3 or 4 days from the end of fermentation to the bar.  I omitted any crystal malt and used a good deal of raw sugar as the yeast is designed to be a low-medium attenuator.

1.051 OG
5.5 gallons
39.5 IBU
5.4% ABV
90 minute boil

6.6 lbs Pilsner LME
4oz pale chocolate malt
12oz special roast
.5oz Northern Brewer 90 mins
.5oz NB 60 mins
.5oz NB 15 mins
1/2 irish moss 10 mins
1/2 tsp yeast nutrient 10 mins
1lb raw sugar 10 mins
.5oz NB at flameout, steeped 20 mins
Pitched a 2L starter with 3 smack packs Wyeast 2112 on a stir plate (it was pretty old yeast)
Aerated with O2 for 30 seconds

Currently fermenting at 59-60 F.  It was fermenting so vigorously the night before last that it actually popped the top off of my fermenting bucket.  Thankfully it was inside a fermentation chamber or I would have had a real mess on my hands!

I will taste it once fermentation is done and evaluate the need for a rest period before bottling.  I've got high hopes for this one!

Online hopfenundmalz

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Re: Cali Common
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2012, 07:53:44 AM »
Just had to look up Northern Brewer Hops.  Those were developed in England in 1934, but no idea when those were introduced to the USA.  So the beers brewed pre-prohibition or in the Gold Rush days used different hops.
Jeff Rankert
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Offline kgs

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Re: Cali Common
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2012, 11:06:25 AM »
Just had to look up Northern Brewer Hops.  Those were developed in England in 1934, but no idea when those were introduced to the USA.  So the beers brewed pre-prohibition or in the Gold Rush days used different hops.

The chapter on Cal Common in Designing Great Beers is (like the rest of the book) great reading. Daniels says there is little to go on, but that historically, the hops were U.S.-grown, and "probably California-grown Cluster hops." In the NHC second-round beers he analyzed, Cascade was the most popular hop, followed by Northern Brewer.
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Re: Cali Common
« Reply #18 on: February 11, 2012, 11:32:20 AM »
Just had to look up Northern Brewer Hops.  Those were developed in England in 1934, but no idea when those were introduced to the USA.  So the beers brewed pre-prohibition or in the Gold Rush days used different hops.

The chapter on Cal Common in Designing Great Beers is (like the rest of the book) great reading. Daniels says there is little to go on, but that historically, the hops were U.S.-grown, and "probably California-grown Cluster hops." In the NHC second-round beers he analyzed, Cascade was the most popular hop, followed by Northern Brewer.

Cluster was about 75-80 of the US hop crop until the early 70's.

California used to grow a fair amount of hops.  There were hop fields in the SF and Sacramento areas until the land became more valuable for real estate.  The North Bay area also grew hops, untul the land became more valuable for grapes.  The hop kilns from one farm are still standing and are the visitors area for the Hop Kiln winery.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild, AHA Member, BJCP Certified
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline morticaixavier

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Re: Cali Common
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2012, 03:02:14 PM »
Just had to look up Northern Brewer Hops.  Those were developed in England in 1934, but no idea when those were introduced to the USA.  So the beers brewed pre-prohibition or in the Gold Rush days used different hops.

The chapter on Cal Common in Designing Great Beers is (like the rest of the book) great reading. Daniels says there is little to go on, but that historically, the hops were U.S.-grown, and "probably California-grown Cluster hops." In the NHC second-round beers he analyzed, Cascade was the most popular hop, followed by Northern Brewer.

Cluster was about 75-80 of the US hop crop until the early 70's.

California used to grow a fair amount of hops.  There were hop fields in the SF and Sacramento areas until the land became more valuable for real estate.  The North Bay area also grew hops, untul the land became more valuable for grapes.  The hop kilns from one farm are still standing and are the visitors area for the Hop Kiln winery.

if you cruise around the back roads here in the sacremento/north bay area you see alot of 'hop kiln' roads and the like. It's like back east and in the midwest where there are tons of 'hemp' names. you can tell alot about historical agricultural practices by looking at old street and town names.
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