Author Topic: Native American alcoholic beverages  (Read 3682 times)

Offline nateo

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2012, 07:34:29 PM »
Tom makes a good point that it's intellectually dangerous to treat "Native American" culture as if it is/was a monolithic culture and ethnicity.

Wow. I certainly made no such suggestion. Ya'll just keep it to the chica bend and the like so I don't have to lock 'er up again. m'kay?  ;)

That wasn't pointed at anyone in particular, and certainly not you. I was just pointing out that there are many different people in the world, and small differences to me (as an outsider) might be big differences to the people I'm talking about (whomever they may be).
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Offline euge

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2012, 08:52:02 PM »
To me the idea of "chicha" sounds pretty revolting though with some refinements it might not be half bad; the memories of DFH doing one on TV comes to mind. 

So we have to malt the corn first? Could we just use some other emzymes?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline nateo

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2012, 09:40:21 PM »
To me the idea of "chicha" sounds pretty revolting though with some refinements it might not be half bad; the memories of DFH doing one on TV comes to mind. 

So we have to malt the corn first? Could we just use some other emzymes?

Bioferm L or Convertase AG300 would do the trick. Malting corn sounds like a PITA.
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Offline euge

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2012, 09:51:13 PM »
To me the idea of "chicha" sounds pretty revolting though with some refinements it might not be half bad; the memories of DFH doing one on TV comes to mind. 

So we have to malt the corn first? Could we just use some other emzymes?

Bioferm L or Convertase AG300 would do the trick. Malting corn sounds like a PITA.

Was I whining? Yes. ;D

Thanks.
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2012, 10:51:05 PM »
Sure you COULD just use enzymes, but then why not just ferment corn sugar? Or flaked corn with a pound of 6-row?  :)

I just think it would be cool to do it more traditionally.  Although I think I'd boil it so it wouldn't go all sour and have to be consumed after 12 hours.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline bluesman

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2012, 08:59:15 AM »
If you're curious about Native American alcoholic beverages...here's a host of them. Each of which come from different tribes and regions in the Americas.

Several Native American civilizations developed alcoholic beverages. Many versions of these beverages are still produced today.
 
Pulque, or octli is an alcoholic beverage made from the fermented juice of the maguey, and is a traditional native beverage of Mesoamerica. Though commonly believed to be a beer, the main carbohydrate is a complex form of fructose rather than starch. Pulque is depicted in Native American stone carvings from as early as AD 200. The origin of pulque is unknown, but because it has a major position in religion, many folk tales explain its origins.
 
Balché is the name of a honey wine brewed by the Maya, associated with the Mayan deity Acan. The drink shares its name with the balché tree (Lonchocarpus violaceus), the bark of which is fermented in water together with honey from the indigenous stingless bee.
 
Tepache is a mildly alcoholic beverage indigenous to Mexico that is created by fermenting pineapple, including the rind, for a short period of three days.
 
Tejuino, traditional to the Mexican state of Jalisco, is a maize-based beverage that involves fermenting masa dough.
 
Chicha is a Spanish word for any of variety of traditional fermented beverages from the Andes region of South America. It can be made of maize, manioc root (also called yuca or cassava) or fruits among other things. During the Inca Empire women were taught the techniques of brewing chicha in Acllahuasis (feminine schools). Chicha de jora is prepared by germinating maize, extracting the malt sugars, boiling the wort, and fermenting it in large vessels, traditionally huge earthenware vats, for several days. In some cultures, in lieu of germinating the maize to release the starches, the maize is ground, moistened in the chicha maker's mouth and formed into small balls which are then flattened and laid out to dry. Naturally occurring diastase enzymes in the maker's saliva catalyzes the breakdown of starch in the maize into maltose. Chicha de jora has been prepared and consumed in communities throughout in the Andes for millennia. The Inca used chicha for ritual purposes and consumed it in vast quantities during religious festivals. In recent years, however, the traditionally prepared chicha is becoming increasingly rare. Only in a small number of towns and villages in southern Peru and Bolivia is it still prepared.
 
Cauim is a traditional alcoholic beverage of the Native American populations of Brazil since pre-Columbian times. It is still made today in remote areas throughout Panama and South America. Cauim is very similar to chicha and it is also made by fermenting manioc or maize, sometimes flavored with fruit juices. The Kuna Indians of Panama use plantains. A characteristic feature of the beverage is that the starting material is cooked, chewed, and re-cooked prior to fermentation. As in the making of chicha, enzymes from the saliva of the cauim maker breakdown the starches into fermentable sugars.
 
Tiswin, or niwai is a mild, fermented, ceremonial beverage produced by various cultures living in the region encompassing the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Among the Apache, tiswin was made from maize, while the Tohono O'odham brewed tiswin using saguaro sap. The Tarahumara variety, called tesgüino, can be made from a variety of different ingredients. Recent archaeological evidence has also revealed the production of a similar maize-based intoxicant among the ancestors of the Pueblo peoples.
 
In addition, the Iroquois fermented sap from the sugar maple tree to produce a mildly alcoholic beverage.
Ron Price

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2012, 01:52:19 AM »
Great stuff, thanks Ron.  Were you able to find anything about indigenous NW alcoholic beverages?  I tried contacting one of the local tribes but got no reply.  It's possible they didn't have any, but I don't know. :-\
Tom Schmidlin

Offline bluesman

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #22 on: February 12, 2012, 08:20:12 AM »
Great stuff, thanks Ron.  Were you able to find anything about indigenous NW alcoholic beverages?  I tried contacting one of the local tribes but got no reply.  It's possible they didn't have any, but I don't know. :-\

Good question Tom...I'm not aware of any specific beverage but I bet if you do some digging (no pun intended), you will find something. Do you have any Native American Museums in the area?
Ron Price

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Native American alcoholic beverages
« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2012, 05:01:37 PM »
Great stuff, thanks Ron.  Were you able to find anything about indigenous NW alcoholic beverages?  I tried contacting one of the local tribes but got no reply.  It's possible they didn't have any, but I don't know. :-\

Good question Tom...I'm not aware of any specific beverage but I bet if you do some digging (no pun intended), you will find something. Do you have any Native American Museums in the area?
Good idea - there are lots places that display native art, but that's not the same thing obviously.  There are probably museums for just native artifacts, I'll have to keep my eyes open.
Tom Schmidlin