Author Topic: Honey bee adjunct  (Read 1780 times)

Offline therealmccoy

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Honey bee adjunct
« on: February 12, 2012, 02:59:21 PM »
One just flew into the fermenter and sunk.

Any thoughts and or concerns?

Should I transfer or leave it in.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 11694
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2012, 03:19:17 PM »
Leave it alone.  You'll be fine.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline tschmidlin

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8131
  • Redmond, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2012, 04:42:30 PM »
Pollen makes good yeast nutrient.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline therealmccoy

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 9
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2012, 04:57:39 PM »
I like that.  I'll submit it for NHC!

Add 1 Honey bee to primary.

Offline euge

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7229
  • Estilo Casero
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2012, 06:55:02 PM »
Committed Kamakazi in your fermenter did she?

Well the beer should be fine but it is contaminated so if there are effects they'll show at some point.

The one time I tried Denny's RIPA a June-bug drowned herself in my freshly cooled wort. Turned out badly. :(
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Offline hokerer

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2634
  • Manassas, VA
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2012, 07:35:10 PM »
The one time I tried Denny's RIPA a June-bug drowned herself in my freshly cooled wort. Turned out badly. :(

My "turned out badly" experience involved a housefly (discussed earlier http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=2692.msg30878#msg30878
Joe

Offline jlap

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 48
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2012, 08:14:13 PM »
On a windy day last fall, I had a giant leaf helicopter into my chilled wort when I removed the lid halfway.  It just had the perfect angle of attack.  The beer turned out fine.  I think that strong fermentation and yeast health can really go a long way toward protecting the flavor of the beer/preventing infection.  A lot of infections I've seen are associated with beer that isn't really being fermented properly in the first place - no starter, not pitching enough, repitching old yeast from previous batches etc.

Offline majorvices

  • Global Moderator
  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *****
  • Posts: 6310
  • Polka. If its too loud you're too young.
    • View Profile
    • Yellowhammer Brewing Company
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2012, 05:55:40 AM »
On a windy day last fall, I had a giant leaf helicopter into my chilled wort when I removed the lid halfway.  It just had the perfect angle of attack.  The beer turned out fine.  I think that strong fermentation and yeast health can really go a long way toward protecting the flavor of the beer/preventing infection.  A lot of infections I've seen are associated with beer that isn't really being fermented properly in the first place - no starter, not pitching enough, repitching old yeast from previous batches etc.

I agree. I wouldn't harvest yeast from the beer, but if you get teh fermentation rockin' you most likely won't have a problem. Surely the beer was covered in wild yeast, but probably not going to be able to outcompete the brewers pitch.
Keith Y.
Self appointed "All Grain" section pruner

Offline gmac

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2030
  • London, Ontario
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #8 on: February 14, 2012, 03:35:09 PM »
She won't drink that much.

Offline ryang

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 429
  • Indian Hills CO
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2012, 04:06:36 PM »
How can you tell the difference between a social drinker, a problem drinker, and an alcoholic?
A fly (or bee!) flies into the social drinker's beer and he kindly asks for another.
A fly flies into the problem drinker's beer and he pulls it out and drinks his beer.
A fly flies into the alcoholic's beer and he pulls it out and yells, "Spit it out!"

Sorry, had to.

Offline Slowbrew

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1658
  • The Slowly Losing IT Brewery in Urbandale, IA
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2012, 04:10:15 PM »
I have a beer we call Bumble Bee Wheat because the boiling wort consumed several bumble bees one day I was brewing it.  Not quite the same situation but the bees didn't cause me any issues.  My victims were in the boil though and not in the fermenter.

Paul
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline tubercle

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1639
  • Sweet Caroline
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2012, 04:24:08 PM »
I've had bees, wasp, various flying bugs, leaves, etc end up in the boil pot with no ill effects.
 I have wonder though about wasp or other venomous insects in the wort and the effect on people tha are allergic.

 Does the boiling negate the poison?
Sweet Caroline where the Sun rises over the deep blue sea and sets somewhere beyond Tennessee

Offline tschmidlin

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8131
  • Redmond, WA
    • View Profile
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2012, 01:04:34 AM »
Does the boiling negate the poison?
I would guess it does.  At least some of them are denatured by boiling in lab studies.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline erockrph

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2436
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • Critical Tastings
Re: Honey bee adjunct
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2012, 09:39:12 AM »
Does the boiling negate the poison?
I would guess it does.  At least some of them are denatured by boiling in lab studies.

Heat-denatured proteins have been shown to bind less IgE, and would therefore pose a reduced risk of triggering an anaphylactic response, but there is likely some risk still present. Of course, I'm not sure how much venom would be extracted from an insect's venom sacs in the first place if they landed in your wort whole and didn't end up getting smashed open somehow.

In other words, I think we are looking at an extremely low (but not zero) risk.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer