Author Topic: Rye  (Read 1597 times)

Offline tesgüino

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Rye
« on: February 04, 2012, 10:03:05 AM »
I brewed a specialty rye beer and have some concern about it having a slick mouthfeel. It’s a 1.075 OG recipe that had 40% rye (30% malted / 10% flaked) and 80 IBU's of American hops. Kind of a Roggenbier meets American IPA experiment. It's tasty, but I’m thinking the mouthfeel might be a distracting problem.

So, here's the question. Is it even a problem? In a BJCP competition, would slick mouthfeel take away points in a rye based beer in the Specialty Beer category? The guidelines describe a Roggenbier as having a medium to full body, but nothing specifically about slickness. Any judges or someone experienced with rye beers have an opinion on how the beer would do in a contest?
« Last Edit: February 04, 2012, 10:09:33 AM by tesgüino »

Offline denny

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Re: Rye
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2012, 10:57:31 AM »
A rye beer is expected to have a certain amount of slickness in the mouthfeel.
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Offline tesgüino

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Re: Rye
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2012, 12:18:33 PM »
Thanks Denny. I suppose the trick is knowing how much a "certain amount" is. There's a local competition coming up where I could find out where this stands. Just hate the thought of submitting something that they would consider awful.

Offline alcaponejunior

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Re: Rye
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2012, 03:13:59 PM »
I'm not a judge, but you can send me a bottle and I'll tell you if it's awful or not.  ;D

I love rye beers, btw.

Offline thomasbarnes

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Re: Rye
« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2012, 11:57:37 PM »
I brewed a specialty rye beer and have some concern about it having a slick mouthfeel. It’s a 1.075 OG recipe that had 40% rye (30% malted / 10% flaked) and 80 IBU's of American hops. Kind of a Roggenbier meets American IPA experiment. It's tasty, but I’m thinking the mouthfeel might be a distracting problem.

If the "slickness" is a creaminess and chewiness from the protein in the rye, you're fine. If it's due to diacetyl (i.e., buttery or butterscotch aroma or flavor, lingering "oily" slickness in mouthfeel) it's a fault.

The difference in texture is the mouth texture of gravy or oatmeal vs. the mouth texture of artificial butter.

Enter the beer in category 23 as a "Rye IPA" and any judge worth his salt will know what it is.

If you have any questions before you enter the beer in competition, scare up a ranked BJCP judge and have them taste and critique your beer. No need to spend money and time to enter a beer that's not going to be competitive.



Offline mabrungard

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Re: Rye
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2012, 06:41:39 AM »
My impression is that the effect is primarily the result of high beta glucan concentration in the beer.  Even though rye has less beta glucan production than oats and barley, the high percentage of rye added to the grist in the pursuit of rye's spicy flavor is what is pushes the overall beta glucan into the different or weird mouthfeel range.  I suppose it could also be termed a slickness in the mouthfeel. 

I did several beers with several percent flaked barley last year and they had moussy head production and a very interesting mouthfeel.  They were interesting experiments, but it was clear to me that I overdid the effect.  Excessive beta glucan does not really improve a beer. 

Given that we are going after the flavor of the rye in a beer like this, I have the feeling that this is a case when a brewer would want to employ a beta glucan rest in the mash to help reduce that effect while leaving the flavor. 
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Rye
« Reply #6 on: February 14, 2012, 09:10:51 PM »
I find that unless special measures are taken including protein rest, beta-glucan rest, prolonged mash temperature in the 140s, etc., rye will give you a thick, chewy, and creamy body and mouthfeel with a thick, creamy head.  It's very much expected out of a beer such as yours with 40% rye.  Whether the judges will know this fact or not, who knows.
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