Author Topic: WL 670 American Farmhouse  (Read 2542 times)

Offline rbowers

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WL 670 American Farmhouse
« on: February 18, 2012, 08:35:04 PM »
Has anyone used this strain before and if so what have been your impressions?  I picked up a bottle for a saison I have planned.  I was curious what anyone thinks about progressively increasing the fermentation temp may yield in terms of flavors.  The suggested temp range is 68-72 but I know a lot of saisons ferment progressively higher.  I was thinking of trying this going up into the high 70s thru primary fermentation to accentuate some of the yeast flavors but not necessarily sure how this yeast may react.  Any thoughts?
Primary:
Nada

Secondary:
APA
Galaxy APA

Lagering:
Helles

Conditioning:
American IPA

On Tap:
German Alt
English IPA
Saison Du Buff Clone
Witbier

Bottles
Flanders Red

Coming Up:
Belgian Stout

Online musseldoc

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Re: WL 670 American Farmhouse
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2012, 05:52:45 AM »
I like to do that with all of my Belgian beers.  I like them to be highly attenuated and as the monks say "highly digestible". 
This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption... Beer! - Friar Tuck

Offline brewmichigan

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Re: WL 670 American Farmhouse
« Reply #2 on: February 29, 2012, 09:00:46 AM »
I just bought some of this. I plan on doing a fermentation in the range they specify. Then I will use it again and change the temp and maybe ramp up a little higher to see what happens. Play around and let us know what happens.
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline hoser

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Re: WL 670 American Farmhouse
« Reply #3 on: February 29, 2012, 09:15:09 AM »
Just be aware that there is Brettanomyces in the 670 strain.  This accounts for the attenuation.  Be very sound in your cleanliness and sanitation and keep your normal brewing plastics away from your "bug" plastics.

Offline brewmichigan

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Re: WL 670 American Farmhouse
« Reply #4 on: February 29, 2012, 09:30:15 AM »
Just be aware that there is Brettanomyces in the 670 strain.  This accounts for the attenuation.  Be very sound in your cleanliness and sanitation and keep your normal brewing plastics away from your "bug" plastics.
Aware and noted. Thanks
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline brewmichigan

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Re: WL 670 American Farmhouse
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2012, 06:51:26 AM »
Well it's been well over a month, almost 2, since I made my saison with the american farmhouse strain and I have some initial perceptions. I believe this strain will do well to being left alone for a good 3-4 months to let the brett work on the wort more than I have let it. The og was 1.060 and the final was around 1.010 when I kegged. The beer is exceptionally malty considering the lower final gravity and being 6.5ish percent. I was hoping for a little more spicy-ness, fruitiness, or funk to dominate but it's the malt right now. I think this one will age well and will only get better with age. I'm going to bottle from the keg for a trip I'm taking with the family so we can enjoy a case of it otherwise I would have let this one go for a little longer.

I'm going to brew when I get back and make another saison style with it but let it sit for a good 2 months or longer before I keg it to see if some of the brett shows itself. All in all a good blend but I will reserve final judgement until after I use it again.
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline a witty man

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Re: WL 670 American Farmhouse
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2012, 11:54:44 AM »
I just kegged a saison that I made with 670 back in early February.

With an OG of 1.065, I ramped up temperatures to 85 over a week or so, and held it there until it hit 1.010 (85% attenuation). Then I transferred to a secondary, and held it at 65-68 for about a month, until it dropped to 1.008 (88%). A pellicle was just starting to form on the top of the secondary when I decided to keg it (impatience, and it had a nice balance of funk and fruit). It has both the spiciness of the saison, and mellow funk from the Brett. I am planning on dry hopping half of the batch with citra (the hops I used in the boil) -- the taste-test I did with citra in a french press complexified the fruitiness of the yeast nicely.

I split this batch with a buddy who drank his young before the brett character showed up, I think he'll regret it when he tastes mine. I agree with brewmichigan -- these results make me want to brew one to age it longer and see what develops. I really like this yeast -- its a fun one!
~Aaron
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www.zephyrfermentedbeverages.blogspot.com