Author Topic: Weyermann Floor-Malted Bo Pils Malt -- Suitable for Light German Lagers?  (Read 9063 times)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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So far I've made a BoPils and a Kolsch with it.  This weekend is my Munich Helles.  Do you plan on incorporating a protein rest or no?

Made a BoPils with it, no protein rest, and it has brilliant clarity.
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Offline jmcamerlengo

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I havent tried this malt yet without a decoction. I know it is slightly undermodified, any issues with step or infusion mashes with this malt?
Jason
-Head Brewer, Brewtus Brewers in the Shenango Valley. Hopefully opening a brewpub/nano brewery in the next couple years.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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I havent tried this malt yet without a decoction. I know it is slightly undermodified, any issues with step or infusion mashes with this malt?
A Kolbach index under 37 would get you in the slightly undermodified range.  I did do a decoction using it, but it was a Hochkurz starting at 144F.

If you wish a step mash with a rest at 131-133F for 10 to 15 min. would take care of any haze that may or may not be there.
Jeff Rankert
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Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline jmcamerlengo

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I havent tried this malt yet without a decoction. I know it is slightly undermodified, any issues with step or infusion mashes with this malt?
A Kolbach index under 37 would get you in the slightly undermodified range.  I did do a decoction using it, but it was a Hochkurz starting at 144F.

If you wish a step mash with a rest at 131-133F for 10 to 15 min. would take care of any haze that may or may not be there.

Thats kind of what I thought. I will try this with a step mash of 131-144-158-168 and post results!
Jason
-Head Brewer, Brewtus Brewers in the Shenango Valley. Hopefully opening a brewpub/nano brewery in the next couple years.

Offline nateo

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A Kolbach index under 37 would get you in the slightly undermodified range.  I did do a decoction using it, but it was a Hochkurz starting at 144F.

If you wish a step mash with a rest at 131-133F for 10 to 15 min. would take care of any haze that may or may not be there.

Hopfen is right. A Kolbach of 38 is in the "normal" for single-infusion malts, and overmodified for malts intended for decoction mashing. I would worry about excessive degradation (head killing) if you stop in the 130's.

http://www.brewingtechniques.com/bmg/noonan.html

"Malts destined for infusion mashing should have an SNR of 36-42%, or up to 45% for light-bodied beer. At a percentage much over 45% SNR, the beer will be thin in body and mouthfeel. For traditional lager malts, 30-33% indicates undermodification, and 37-40% indicates overmodification."
« Last Edit: April 19, 2012, 07:59:00 AM by nateo »
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Offline davidgzach

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Jason,

I did a 20 minute protein rest at 130 for the Kolsch.  Then 150 for 90 minutes.

For my BoPils, I did a 30 minute protein rest at 128, followed by infusion to 146 for 45 minutes, followed by a 15 minute boiled decoction to 158 for what ended up being 90 minutes because I was making another beer (gluten free for buddy) that tied up my kettle.  Mashed out at 170.  Bubbling along happily in my chest freezer at 52F.  Will post results. 

Dave
« Last Edit: April 19, 2012, 08:02:01 AM by davidgzach »
Dave Zach

Offline nateo

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I got a sack of this malt because I intend to brew a no-sparge single-infusion Helles and a decoction Helles to see if I can tell a difference. When my fermentors open up next month I'll brew those. 
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Offline jmcamerlengo

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excellent everyone! Let me know how things turn out.

Dave thats a long protein rest!
Jason
-Head Brewer, Brewtus Brewers in the Shenango Valley. Hopefully opening a brewpub/nano brewery in the next couple years.

Offline davidgzach

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excellent everyone! Let me know how things turn out.

Dave thats a long protein rest!

I like mixing it up.  Took the recipe out of 'Designing Great Beers'.  I know malts have become more modified in the past 10 years, but I figured "what the heck".
Dave Zach

Offline denny

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I got a sack of this malt because I intend to brew a no-sparge single-infusion Helles and a decoction Helles to see if I can tell a difference. When my fermentors open up next month I'll brew those.

I volunteer to help you test!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline nateo

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I volunteer to help you test!

That might be fun. Maybe we can get a few people to do blind tastings? I've never mailed homebrew before, so, how do you do that? Specifically, I wonder if it'd be better to bottle samples in PET than glass. Is it more likely the glass would break or the plastic cap would leak?

I'll try to schedule both brews on the same day to minimize aging differences.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2012, 11:40:41 AM by nateo »
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Offline denny

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I volunteer to help you test!

That might be fun. Maybe we can get a few people to do blind tastings? I've never mailed homebrew before, so, how do you do that? Specifically, I wonder if it'd be better to bottle samples in PET than glass. Is it more likely the glass would break or the plastic cap would leak?

I'll try to schedule both brews on the same day to minimize aging differences.

PET would probably be better.  When I mail glass bottles, I put each one in a zip lock bag.  Then wrap that in bubble wrap, then wrap that in newspaper.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

Offline davidgzach

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I'll gladly volunteer and offer up a bottle of my BoPils with the protein rest, hochkurz mash and single decoction to the participants.
Dave Zach

Offline jmcamerlengo

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Me as well.

100% Floor Malted BoPils
100% Saaz

Doughed in cold, ramped to 127. Held for 10 minutes
Pulled thick decoction. Rest at 158 for 20 minutes. Boil for 30 minutes.
Meanwhile in main "thin" mash ramp to 144 after main protein rest.
Add decoction back to hit 158. Hold 30 minutes.
Mashout @ 170.

WY2001.

Its lagering now. Should be ready in about 3-4 weeks.
Jason
-Head Brewer, Brewtus Brewers in the Shenango Valley. Hopefully opening a brewpub/nano brewery in the next couple years.

Offline farmbrew

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Both Weyermann and Durst make Pale Ale malts.  I have never seen the variety mentioned.

Here's what the Weyermann website says
"The Weyermann® Bohemian Pilsner Malt, for example, is produced only from the Hanka barley variety, while the Weyermann® floor-malted Bohemian Pilsner Malt is produced only from Bojos or Tolar. These three varieties have great authenticity value because they are genetic descendants of the mid-19th-century Czech variety Haná, which also known as "Old-Haná Agro-Ecotype.” Haná was the barley in the first Pilsner mash, in 1842, and it has since become the foundation land race for hundreds of top-quality brewing barley varieties cultivated throughout the world today."

They also mention that they now produce an oak smoked wheat malt for making Gratzer!!!

I've used the floor malted pilsner for saisons...sunshine in a glass  :)

F
FV: Das Kohlbeet Hefeweizen
Conditioning: Rye Saison
In the Bottle: Beetnik Porter, Real cider, Cool Runnings Biere d'Garde, Dug 80/-, Aittin Rye&Juniper Ale


Steeping:
Germination: